Pendulum Divination

A pendulum is one of the simplest and easiest forms of divination. It’s a simple matter of Yes/No questions being asked and answered. Although you can purchase pendulums commercially, ranging from about $15 – $60, it’s not hard to make one of your own. Typically, most people use a crystal or stone, but you can use any object that’s got a bit of weight to it.

MAKE YOUR OWN PENDULUM

If you decide to make your own pendulum, you’ll need a few basic supplies:

  • A crystal or other stone
  • Jeweler’s wire or string
  • A lightweight chain

Take the crystal and wrap it in a length of jeweler’s wire. When you’re done wrapping it, leave a loop at the top. Attach one end of the chain to the loop. You’ll want to make sure the chain isn’t too long, because you’ll probably be using it over a table or other surface. Generally, a chain between 10 – 14″ is perfect. Also, be sure you tuck in any poky pieces of wire so you don’t jab yourself later.

CHARGE AND CALIBRATE YOUR PENDULUM…

For the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/pendulum-divination-2561760?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170502&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Beltane Rites and Rituals

April’s showers have given way to rich and fertile earth, and as the land greens, there are few celebrations as representative of fertility as Beltane. Observed on May 1st (or October 31 – November 1 for our Southern Hemisphere readers), festivities typically begin the evening before, on the last night of April. It’s a time to welcome the abundance of the fertile earth, and a day that has a long (and sometimes scandalous) history. Try some of these rituals and ceremonies for your Beltane sabbat celebration.

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Okay, so we know that Beltane is a fertility festival… but how do you translate that into altar setup? Here are some tips on how to set up your altar to celebrate the Beltane sabbat.

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For Patti Wigington’s other seven suggestions for different things to do for Beltane please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/beltane-rites-and-rituals-2561678?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170427&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

 

The Magic of Beltane

Beltane is a season of fertility and fire, and we often find this reflected in the magic of the season. Let’s look at some of that spring magic, from ritual sex to fertility magic, along with the magic found in gardens and nature.

Ritual Sex and the Great Rite: Beltane is a time of passion and fertility, so for many people, it’s a time for ritual sex. Here’s what you need to know.
Fertility Magic and Customs: There’s a lot of folklore surrounding fertility. Let’s look at some beliefs from around the world.
Chocolate and Sex: Chocolate as an aphrodisiac? You bet! In fact, it’s scientifically proven.
Make Magic in Your Garden
Sacred Plants of the Beltane Season: Let’s look at some of the plants that are considered sacred to the Beltane season.
Plant a Magical Moon Garden: If you’re a night owl, consider planting a moon garden, full of fragrant plants that open and bloom at night.
Magical Spring Flowers
Spring Garden Folklore
Forsythia Magic and Legends
Lilac Magic & Folklore
The Magic of Dandelions: Dandelions are everywhere in the spring, so let’s look at some of the magic and folklore behind them.
Magical Herbal Correspondences
Magical Prosperity Soap
Horse Magic, Folkore and Legends
Butterfly Myth and Magic
Graveyard Dirt: Do you use graveyard dirt in magic? You can – here’s how

please click on this link for the rest of the article: https://www.thoughtco.com/guide-to-beltane-magic-2561638?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170427&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

All About Beltane – Celebrating the Fertility of Spring

April’s showers have given way to rich and fertile earth, and as the land greens, there are few celebrations as representative of fertility as Beltane. Observed on May 1st (or October 31 – November 1 for our Southern Hemisphere readers), festivities typically begin the evening before, on the last night of April. It’s a time to welcome the abundance of the fertile earth, and a day that has a long (and sometimes scandalous) history.

Depending on your tradition, there are a number of ways you can celebrate this Sabbat.

RITUALS AND CEREMONIES

There are many different ways you can celebrate Beltane, but the focus is nearly always on fertility. It’s the time when the earth mother opens up to the fertility god, and their union brings about healthy livestock, strong crops, and new life all around.

Here are a few rituals you may want to think about trying—and remember, any of them can be adapted for either a solitary practitioner or a small group, with just a little planning ahead.

By Patti Wigington for more on Beltane please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/guide-to-the-beltane-celebration-2561640?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170427&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

All About Samhain – Celebrating the Witches’ New Year in the Southern Hemisphere Part 4

CRAFTS AND CREATIONS

As Samhain approaches, decorate your home (and keep your kids entertained) with a number of easy craft projects. Start celebrating a bit early with these fun and simple ideas that honor the final harvest, and the cycle of life and death.

FEASTING AND FOOD

No Pagan celebration is really complete without a meal to go along with it.

At Samhain, celebrate with foods that celebrate the final harvest, and the death of the fields.

By Patti Wigington

All About Samhain – Celebrating the Witches’ New Year in the Southern Hemisphere Part 5

TRADITIONS AND TRENDS

Interested in learning about some of the traditions behind the celebrations of the late harvest? Find out why Samhain is important, learn why black cats are considered unlucky, how trick-or-treating became so popular and more!

By Patti Wigington

All About Samhain – Celebrating the Witches’ New Year in the Southern Hemisphere Part 2

SAMHAIN MAGIC, DIVINATION AND SPIRIT WORK

For many Pagans, Samhain is a time to do magic that focuses on the spirit world. Learn how to properly conduct a seance, how to do some Samhain divination workings, and the way to figure out what a spirit guide is really up to!

By Patti Wigington

All About Samhain – Celebrating the Witches’ New Year in the Southern Hemisphere Part 1

The fields are bare, the leaves have fallen from the trees, and the skies are going gray and cold. It is the time of year when the earth has died and gone dormant. Every year on October 31 (or May 1, if you’re in the Southern Hemisphere) the Sabbat we call Samhain presents us with the opportunity to once more celebrate the cycle of death and rebirth. For many Pagan traditions, Samhain is a time to reconnect with our ancestors, and honor those who have died.

This is the time when the veil between our world and the spirit realm is thin, so it’s the perfect time of year to make contact with the dead.

RITUALS AND CEREMONIES

Depending on your individual spiritual path, there are many different ways you can celebrate Samhain, but typically the focus is on either honoring our ancestors, or the cycle of death and rebirth. This is the time of year when the gardens and fields are brown and dead. The nights are getting longer, there’s a chill in the air, and winter is looming. We may choose to honor our ancestors, celebrating those who have died, and even try to communicate with them. Here are a few rituals you may want to think about trying for Samhain — and remember, any of them can be adapted for either a solitary practitioner or a small group, with just a little planning ahead.

By Patti Wigington

Flashback 2008 – Winter Solstice

Yule

At Yule, the Oak King who rules during the waxing year conquers the Holly King in order to reign until Midsummer, when the two meet again. It is believed that the Holly King has evolved into the modern day Santa Claus, wearing red, with holly in his hat. His eight deer represent the Pagan sabbats, as animals as regarded scared by the Celtic gods. Although the Oak King and the Holly King are opposing forces at Litha and Yule, they com[lement each other. In ancient times, the Sun’s return after a long period of scarcity and darkness affirmed survival and resilience in the winter season.

A few days before Yule, decorate your home with oranges studded with cloves to release a warm, yuletide aroma. It’s time to feast, exchange gifts, and thank the Goddess for the return of abundance and light. At your Yule gathering, cozy up up to your favorite people and enjoy some delicious mulled red wine infused with cinnamon sticks and whole cloves. Serve warm in chalices, with a sprinkling of nutmeg, to toast the rebirth of the Oak King. When you take a sip from the chalice, hold hands with your guests and shout, “Wassail” – the old English word for “your health”

Copyright Emely Flak – Llewellyn Witches’ Datebook 2008 Pg 129

Flashback 2008 – Summer Solstice

When the Sun is at its peak in the sky at our Summer Solstice, Earth is as close as possible to the Sun. Litha is the ancient Germanic name for summer and the time to celebrate its warmth. This important time in the solar year is when the Oak King, God of Light, hands over the reign to the Holly King, God of Darkness, who rules from this point forward for the other half of the year.

At this time when light will begin to wane, decorate your altar and house with sunflowers. Place honey on your altar to represent life’s sweetness. Light the same gold candle for a short time for four to five nights over this period. On the last evening, after the candle is safely snuffed, wrap what is left of it in a yellow ribbon or gold colored cloth and keep it somewhere safe for protection and good fortune until next Litha.

Make a sunflower solstice cake decorated with yellow icing and sunflower seeds to share with your friends over a glass of mead. Enjoy your time outdoors, allowing the Sun to warm your body as you relax, walk, or read. Bid farewell to the Sun god for a few months and be assured he will return.

Copyright Emely Flak – Llewellyn Witches’ Datebook 2008 Pg 79