Celebrating Lammas

The year is 1100. The date is August 1. The monks in the abbey at Gloucester are celebrating the holy-day of St. Peter in Chains. One of the monks wakes from a strange dream in which God promises to strike down the wicked King who has abused the Holy Church. His superior, Abbot Serlo, on hearing of the dreams sends a warning to the King, William the Red, who has oppressed all of England with taxes and disgusted many with his licentiousness and blasphemy. Red, as he is called, receives the message the following day while preparing to indulge in one of his favorite sports, hunting, in the New Forest. Although there are no longer any people dwelling in the New Forest — they were all cleared out by Red’s father, William the Conqueror — there are rumors that it’s a hotbed of pagan activity. And August 2 is an important pagan holy-day. The Saxons call it Lammas, the Loaf-Mass. William the Red laughs at the warning from the monks and goes out hunting. A short time later, he is dead, struck in the chest by a stray arrow, and his brother, Henry, who was in the hunting party is riding hot-foot for Winchester and the crown.

Now some people say that William the Red was a Lammas sacrifice, …

Please continue reading by clicking this link: Celebrating Lammas

Aefterra Lipa (Late Litha)

Just as the Winter Solstice is followed in the Old English calendar by the month of Late Yule, the Summer Solstice is followed by Late Litha. In the wake of Midsummer, Sunne begins to wane and the days become shorter. Flax can now be harvested and hay cut and stored for winter fodder.

Although most grains are harvested in the late summer and autumn, under ideal conditions winter wheat can be harvested as early as July. This early grain had to be dried, winnowed, threshed, and ground to become I’m as flour by Lammad (the “load mass”), which celebrated the bread baked from the early harvest. I’m the Christian era, the first loaves were brought to the church to be blessed. The blessed loaves were then sometimes used to work magic, protecting the rest of the harvest grain. I’m the ninth-century Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Mammas is called ” feast of the first fruits. ”

Baked bread and hold your on harvest celebration. Either make th bread from scratch or if you prefer, purchase ready to bake dough found in the freezer section at th supermarket. After your load has resin, invite your friends over so everyone can enjoy the beast aroma of the baking bread.

Copyright Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2017 Page 85 Written by Alaric Albertsson

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Yule/Winter Solstice December 21st

At Samhain we honoured, celebrated and welcomed the descent into, and return of, the dark – the beginning of the New Year, acknowledging that all beginnings emerge from darkness. At the Winter Solstice we reach the depth of that darkness with the longest night of the year. Darkness has reached its peak.

“Now we start to wonder: will this continue? Will the Earth grow darker and colder as the Sun disappears into the south until only darkness is left? But at Yule a wonderful thing happens. The Sun stops its decline and for a few days it rises in about the same place. This is the crucial time, the cusp between events. The Sun stands still, and everyone waits for the turning.

In our heads we know the light will return. But in the darkness of Winter, can we…

To read the rest of this article please click on the following link: https://www.goddessandgreenman.co.uk/yule

Litha/Summer Solstice June 21st.

Here we are, we have arrived at the longest day and the shortest night of the year. The Goddess is now full and pregnant with Child, and the Sun God is at the height of His virility. This is the peak of the Solar year and the Sun is at the height of its life-giving power. The Earth is awash with fertility and fulfillment and this is a time of joy and celebration, of expansiveness and the celebration of achievements.

Yet within this climax is the whisper and promise of a return to the Dark. As the Light reaches its peak so this is also the moment when the power of the Sun begins to wane. From now on the days grow shorter and the nights grow longer and we are drawn back into the Dark to complete the Wheel of the Year.

At this time the God, as Oak King, is rich in abundance, but he…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.goddessandgreenman.co.uk/litha

Litha: Summer Solstice – 21st/22nd June

Litha (Midsummer, Gathering Day, Summer Solstice, Alban Heffyn, Feill-Sheathain)
Incense: Sage, mint, basil, Saint John’s Wort, sunflower, Lavender
Decorations: Dried herbs, potpourri, seashells, summer flowers, and fruits.
Colours: blue, green, and yellow

The Fire Festival of Litha

Midsummer or the Summer Solstice is the most powerful day of the year for the Sun God. Because this Sabbat glorifies the Sun God and the Sun, fire plays a very prominent role in this festival. The element of Fire is the most easily seen and immediately felt element of transformation. It can burn, consume, cook, shed light or purify and balefires still figure prominently at modern Midsummer rites.

Most cultures of the Northern Hemisphere mark Midsummer…

To read the rest of this article please click on the following link: http://www.thewhitegoddess.co.uk/the_wheel_of_the_year/litha_-_summer_solstice.asp

Winter Solstice Find this year’s date in the multifaith calendar

The Pagan celebration of Winter Solstice (also known as Yule) is one of the oldest winter celebrations in the world.

Ancient people were hunters and spent most of their time outdoors. The seasons and weather played a very important part in their lives. Because of this many ancient people had a great reverence for, and even worshipped the sun. The Norsemen of Northern Europe saw the sun as a wheel that changed the seasons. It was from the word for this wheel, houl, that the word yule is thought to have come. At mid-winter the Norsemen lit bonfires, told stories and drank sweet ale.

The ancient Romans also held a festival to celebrate the rebirth…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/paganism/holydays/wintersolstice.shtml

Scrying and Divination Techniques

Scrying is something I bet you’ve done without even realizing it – the beginning part of it anyway.

How many times have you watched the clouds drifting by in the sky, seeing faces and shapes in them? Have you ever stared blankly at a wall, ceiling, or floor and seen faces and shapes move across them?

That is scrying. (kind of) 😉 It means getting into a relaxed, meditative state and focusing on the shapes and symbols we see, and trying to interpret what meaning they may have for us.

Scrying is a form of divination, which means “fortelling the future,” but it is also a great tool…

For the rest of this article please click on this link: http://wingsforthespirit.com/scrying-divination/scrying-divination-techniques/

All About Samhain – Celebrating the Witches’ New Year in the Southern Hemisphere Part 2

SAMHAIN MAGIC, DIVINATION AND SPIRIT WORK

For many Pagans, Samhain is a time to do magic that focuses on the spirit world. Learn how to properly conduct a seance, how to do some Samhain divination workings, and the way to figure out what a spirit guide is really up to!

By Patti Wigington

All About Samhain – Celebrating the Witches’ New Year in the Southern Hemisphere Part 1

The fields are bare, the leaves have fallen from the trees, and the skies are going gray and cold. It is the time of year when the earth has died and gone dormant. Every year on October 31 (or May 1, if you’re in the Southern Hemisphere) the Sabbat we call Samhain presents us with the opportunity to once more celebrate the cycle of death and rebirth. For many Pagan traditions, Samhain is a time to reconnect with our ancestors, and honor those who have died.

This is the time when the veil between our world and the spirit realm is thin, so it’s the perfect time of year to make contact with the dead.

RITUALS AND CEREMONIES

Depending on your individual spiritual path, there are many different ways you can celebrate Samhain, but typically the focus is on either honoring our ancestors, or the cycle of death and rebirth. This is the time of year when the gardens and fields are brown and dead. The nights are getting longer, there’s a chill in the air, and winter is looming. We may choose to honor our ancestors, celebrating those who have died, and even try to communicate with them. Here are a few rituals you may want to think about trying for Samhain — and remember, any of them can be adapted for either a solitary practitioner or a small group, with just a little planning ahead.

By Patti Wigington