Counting Dawn to Celebrating Litha

Each day I will bring you a new song an/or video and/or a back flash from Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook (these will range from 1999[1st year published] until 2019) for our upcoming Litha/Summer Solstice celebrations.

Today I picked a beautiful instrumental with amazing pictures and words that touched my spirit. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

The Witches Sabbat – Litha

Counting Down to Celebrating Yule

Each day I will bring you a new song and/or video and/or a back flash from Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook (these will range from 1999[1st year published] until 2019) for our upcoming Yule/Winter Solstice celebrations.

Today I pick a song whose melody is from my first winter school program where the teacher for some odd reason gave me a short solo. I hope this song or the melody will bring you fond memories from past winters or give you a new memory to think back on.

What Night is This by Katerina ElHaj

Tomorrow will feature a flashback to Yule from Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2000

HONORING LAMMAS – THE FIRST HARVEST

A brief history of Lammas

In Earth-based traditions, Lammas is usually celebrated on August 1, honoring the first harvest of the season. Lammas is also known as Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-NAS-ah). In some Wiccan and Pagan traditions, Lammas is also a day of honoring Lugh, the Celtic god of craftmanship, grain, the Sun, and late summer storms. Lughnasadh is still celebrated in many parts of the world today. At this time of year, the nights are beginning to lengthen and we anticipate the return of fall. This is truly the beginning of shadow season. Before the Wheel turns to the darker months, we can take time to appreciate warmth and sunlight and how they support the season of growth. Gratitude in times of plenty is a powerful practice. What we reap now wasn’t always full-grown. By celebrating Lammas as a harvest holiday, we honor our ancestors and the hard work they had to do in order to survive and secure our lineage.

Like all Celtic or Pagan holidays, Lammas also honors goddesses whose associations, strengths, and myths align with the work we’re doing at this time of year. Ceres, the harvest goddess, known as Demeter by the Greeks, and Tailtiu, mother of Lugh, are great forces of agricultural abundance. We receive their blessings in the bounty of food that will feed us through the rest of the year. Metaphorically, our mental, spiritual, and emotional crops are ready for the first harvest, too. If you set intentions in the darkness of winter or early spring, this is the time to see how they’ve manifested and will support you in the months to come.

To read the ritual ideas click here Lammas/Lughnasadh