Week 7 – Goddess Knowledge – Eagle Woman

Despite the fact that the life-giving and death-wielding Bird Goddess is one of the oldest representations of the goddess, eagles have usually been linked with the masculine, with a few exceptions (the Sphinx of Egypt had the wings of an eagle, and the Aztec goddess Cihuacoatl was also called Eagle Woman). This Eagle Woman shows a new marriage of the feminine and the eagle. SHe represents all an eagle stands for: spirit, valor, majesty, renewal, accuracy of sight, spiritual aim, and the ability to soar to the heights. She also holds in her hands a vessel, the traditional symbol for the feminine, for that which receives, contains, and nourishes. Here both sets of values are joined, emblematic of a different combinations of strengths that are part of women-born.

Eagle Woman is a joyful affirmation of our ability to break out of millennia-old stereotypes and find new definition the embraces our entire continuum of being alive. She teaches the women can express qualities of the eagle while continuing to contain and nurture.

For more information about the Goddess Eagle Woman please click on this link: Informaton about Eagle Woman

To see images of Eagle WOmen please click on this link: Images of Eagle Woman

Defining a Pagan

Pentagram

After a comment the original of this post received I realized I was only presenting a Wicca’s point of view on what a Pagan is. This made me want to change what I had posted to quote other sources as well. I think I have found a wider range of the definition of the word Pagan. I know it might not completely cover everyone’s opinion of what a Pagan is but it gives us room for thought and discussion. Thank you, Sean for your comment that made me want to broaden what I had posted.

“When one defines oneself as Pagan,
it means she or he follows an earth or nature religion,
one that sees the divine manifest in all creation.
The cycles of nature are our holy days, the earth is our temple,
its plants and creatures our partners and teachers.
We worship a deity that is both male and female,
a mother Goddess and a father God,
who together created all that is, was, or will be.
We respect life, cherish the free will of sentient beings,
and accept the sacredness of all creation.” —

Edain McCoy

From the Urban Dictionary:

A somewhat vague term derived from from the Latin word paganus. Pagan is a term which refers to a variety of different religions ranging from Wicca, to that of ancient Egypt and even Hinduism, among many others. Some Pagans are of no specific religion, but rather are eclectic. In general Pagan religions have more than one deity, or many gods which are aspects of one (an idea similar to that of the Christian trinity). Another quite common feature of Pagan religions are that they tend to be nature oriented. Pagan can also be used as a derogatory word for any non-Judeo/Christian/Islamic religion.
“The religion of the ancient Greeks is a Pagan religion”
by Megan Bennett May 25, 2004
From Merriam-Webster Dictionary:
noun pa·gan \ˈpā-gən\

1:  heathen 1; especially :  a follower of a polytheistic religion (as in ancient Rome)

2
:  one who has little or no religion and who delights in sensual pleasures and material goods :  an irreligious or hedonistic person
From Dictionary.Com:
noun
1.

(no longer in technical use) one of a people or community observing a polytheistic religion, as the ancient Romans and Greeks.
2.

a member of a religious, spiritual, or cultural community based on the worship of nature or the earth; a neopagan.
3.

Disparaging and Offensive.

  1. (in historical contexts) a person who is not a Christian, Jew, or Muslim; a heathen.
  2. an irreligious or hedonistic person.
  3. an uncivilized or unenlightened person.
adjective
4.

of, relating to, or characteristic of pagans.
5.

Disparaging and Offensive.

  1. relating to the worship or worshipers of any religion that is neither Christian, Jewish, nor Muslim.
  2. irreligious or hedonistic.
  3. (of a person) uncivilized or unenlightened.

Based On Random House Dictionary:

Heathen and pagan are primarily historical terms that were applied pejoratively, especially by people who were Christian, Jewish, or Muslim, to peoples who were not members of one of those three monotheistic religious groups. Heathen referred especially to the peoples and cultures of primitive or ancient tribes thought to harbor unenlightened, barbaric idol worshipers: heathen rites; heathen idols.
Pagan, although sometimes applied similarly to those tribes, was more often used to refer specifically to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who worshiped the multiple gods and goddesses said to dwell on Mount Olympus, such as Zeus and Athena (called Jupiter and Minerva by the Romans). The term was applied to their beliefs and culture as well: a pagan ritual; a pagan civilization.
Contemporary paganism, having evolved and expanded in Europe and North America since the 20th century, includes adherents of diverse groups that hold various beliefs, which may focus, for example, on the divinity of nature or of the planet Earth or which may be pantheistic or polytheistic. In modern English, heathen remains an offensive term, used to accuse someone of being unenlightened or irreligious; pagan, however, is increasingly a neutral description of certain existing and emerging religious movements.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.