Willow ~ a tree witch

Willow

Willows which by water stand
Ease us to the Summerland.

 

Salix alba

Tree of Enchantment, Tree of Witcheries

Fifth month of the Celtic Tree calendar, 

April 15th – May 12th

 

Fifth consonant of the Ogham alphabet – Saille


Saille Ogham

Planet: Moon

Element: Water

Symbolism: Resonance and Harmony

Stone: Moonstone

Birds: Hawk, Snowy Owl

Color: Silver

Deity: Persephone, Hecate, Cerridwen, 

Artemis, Selene, Luna, Diana, Brigit

Sabbat: Beltane

Folk names: Osier, Pussy Willow, Saille, Salicyn Willow, Saugh Tree, White Willow, 

Witches Aspirin, Withe, Withy

 

Medicinal properties

Willow bark contains salicin, or Salicylic acid, used to make aspirin. 

Infusions from the bark have long been used as a remedy for cholls, rheumatism, and fevers. 

Willow sap applied to the skin can remedy acne, and a strong decoction of boiling 

the bark and leaves in water can be rubbed into the scalp for dandruff.

 

Magickal properties

New Moon magick, creativity, fertility, female rights of passage, inspiration, emotion, binding. Love, Love divination, protection, healing.

 

Also known as the tree of immortality because of its ability to 

re grow from a fallen branch in moist ground.

 

A wand made from Willow wood has many uses: 

sleep with it and have more vivid dreams, use it to draw down the moon, 

protection for underworld journeying

 

Magickal Brooms, witch’s brooms are traditionally bound with a willow’s branch.

 

 

There once was a Willow, and he was very old,

And all his leaves fell off from him, and left him in the cold;

But ere the rude winter could buffet him with snow,

There grew upon his hoary head a crop of mistletoe.

All wrinkled and furrowed was this old Willow’s skin,

His taper finger trembled, and his arms were very thin;

Two round eyes and hollow, that stared but did not see;

And sprawling feet that never walked, had this most ancient tree.

~Julianna Horatia Ewing, “The Willow Man” ”

Read more from the original post

Thanks to

http://www.thegoddesstree.com/trees/Willow.htm

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Beltane Rites and Rituals

April’s showers have given way to rich and fertile earth, and as the land greens, there are few celebrations as representative of fertility as Beltane. Observed on May 1st (or October 31 – November 1 for our Southern Hemisphere readers), festivities typically begin the evening before, on the last night of April. It’s a time to welcome the abundance of the fertile earth, and a day that has a long (and sometimes scandalous) history. Try some of these rituals and ceremonies for your Beltane sabbat celebration.

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Okay, so we know that Beltane is a fertility festival… but how do you translate that into altar setup? Here are some tips on how to set up your altar to celebrate the Beltane sabbat.

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For Patti Wigington’s other seven suggestions for different things to do for Beltane please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/beltane-rites-and-rituals-2561678?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170427&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

 

The Magic of Beltane

Beltane is a season of fertility and fire, and we often find this reflected in the magic of the season. Let’s look at some of that spring magic, from ritual sex to fertility magic, along with the magic found in gardens and nature.

Ritual Sex and the Great Rite: Beltane is a time of passion and fertility, so for many people, it’s a time for ritual sex. Here’s what you need to know.
Fertility Magic and Customs: There’s a lot of folklore surrounding fertility. Let’s look at some beliefs from around the world.
Chocolate and Sex: Chocolate as an aphrodisiac? You bet! In fact, it’s scientifically proven.
Make Magic in Your Garden
Sacred Plants of the Beltane Season: Let’s look at some of the plants that are considered sacred to the Beltane season.
Plant a Magical Moon Garden: If you’re a night owl, consider planting a moon garden, full of fragrant plants that open and bloom at night.
Magical Spring Flowers
Spring Garden Folklore
Forsythia Magic and Legends
Lilac Magic & Folklore
The Magic of Dandelions: Dandelions are everywhere in the spring, so let’s look at some of the magic and folklore behind them.
Magical Herbal Correspondences
Magical Prosperity Soap
Horse Magic, Folkore and Legends
Butterfly Myth and Magic
Graveyard Dirt: Do you use graveyard dirt in magic? You can – here’s how

please click on this link for the rest of the article: https://www.thoughtco.com/guide-to-beltane-magic-2561638?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170427&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

All About Beltane – Celebrating the Fertility of Spring

April’s showers have given way to rich and fertile earth, and as the land greens, there are few celebrations as representative of fertility as Beltane. Observed on May 1st (or October 31 – November 1 for our Southern Hemisphere readers), festivities typically begin the evening before, on the last night of April. It’s a time to welcome the abundance of the fertile earth, and a day that has a long (and sometimes scandalous) history.

Depending on your tradition, there are a number of ways you can celebrate this Sabbat.

RITUALS AND CEREMONIES

There are many different ways you can celebrate Beltane, but the focus is nearly always on fertility. It’s the time when the earth mother opens up to the fertility god, and their union brings about healthy livestock, strong crops, and new life all around.

Here are a few rituals you may want to think about trying—and remember, any of them can be adapted for either a solitary practitioner or a small group, with just a little planning ahead.

By Patti Wigington for more on Beltane please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/guide-to-the-beltane-celebration-2561640?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170427&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

All About Beltane Celebrating the Fertility of Spring

April’s showers have given way to rich and fertile earth, and as the land greens, there are few celebrations as representative of fertility as Beltane. Observed on May 1st (or October 31 – November 1 for our Southern Hemisphere readers), festivities typically begin the evening before, on the last night of April. It’s a time to welcome the abundance of the fertile earth, and a day that has a long (and sometimes scandalous) history.

Depending on your tradition, there are a number of ways you can celebrate this Sabbat.

RITUALS AND CEREMONIES

There are many different ways you can celebrate Beltane, but the focus is nearly always on fertility. It’s the time when the earth mother opens up to the fertility god, and their union brings about healthy livestock, strong crops, and new life all around.

Here are a few rituals you may want to think about trying—and remember, any of them can be adapted for either a solitary practitioner or a small group, with just a little planning ahead.

To read the rest of this article by Patti Wigington please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/guide-to-the-beltane-celebration-2561640?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170411&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Beltane History – Celebrating May Day by Patti Wigington

THE FIRES OF TARA

Beltane kicks off the merry month of May, and has a long history. This fire festival is celebrated on May 1 with bonfires, Maypoles, dancing, and lots of good old fashioned sexual energy. The Celts honored the fertility of the gods with gifts and offerings, sometimes including animal or human sacrifice. Cattle were driven through the smoke of the balefires, and blessed with health and fertility for the coming year.

In Ireland, the fires of Tara were the first ones lit every year at Beltane, and all other fires were lit with a flame from Tara.

ROMAN INFLUENCES

The Romans, always known for celebrating holidays in a big way, spent the first day of May paying tribute to their Lares, the gods of their household. They also celebrated the Floralia, or festival of flowers, which consisted of three days of unbridled sexual activity. Participants wore flowers in their hair (much like May Day celebrants later on), and there were plays, songs, and dances. At the end of the festivities, animals were set loose inside the Circus Maximus, and beans were scattered around to ensure fertility. The fire festival of Bona Dea was also celebrated on May 2nd.

A PAGAN MARTYR…

To read the rest of this article please click on the following link:

https://www.thoughtco.com/the-history-of-beltane-and-may-day-2561657?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170411&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Beltaine Lore History, Customs, Myths and More

Celtic Mythology

Beltaine is the time of the yearly battle between Gwyn ap Nudd and Gwythur ap Greidawl for Creudylad in Welsh mythology. Gwyn ap Nudd, the Wild Huntsman of Wales, is a God of death and the Annwn. Creudylad is the daughter of Llew of the Silver Hand (son of Beli). She is the most beautiful maiden on the Island of Mighty. This is a myth of the battle of winter and summer for the magnificent blossoming earth.

In the myth of Rhiannon and Pwyll, it is the evening of Beltaine, that Rhiannon gives birth to their son. The midwives all fell asleep at the same time, as they were watching over Rhiannon and her new baby, during which he was taken. In order to protect themselves, they smeared blood (from a pup) all over Rhiannon, to which they claim she had eaten her son. The midwives were believed, and Rhiannon was forced to pay penance for seven years. She had to carrying people on her back from the outside of the gate to the palace, although rarely would any allow her to do so. The baby’s whereabouts were a mystery. Oddly, every Beltaine night, one of Pwyll’s vassals, Teirnyon Twryv Vliant, had a mare that gave birth but the colt disappeared. One Beltaine night Teirnyon Twryv Vliant awaited in the barn for the mare to foaled, when she did, he heard a tremendous noise and a clawed arm came through the window and grabbed the colt. Teirnyon cut off the arm with his sword, and then heard a wailing. He opened the door and found a baby, he brought it to his wife and they adopted Gwri Wallt Euryn (Gwri of the Golden Hair). As he grew he looked like Pwyll and they remembered they found him on the night Rhiannon’s baby became lost. Teirnyon brought Gwri of the Golden Hair to the castle, told the story, and he was adopted back to his parents, Rhiannon and Pwyll, and named by the head druid, Pryderi (trouble) from the first word his mother had said when he was restored to her. “Trouble is, indeed, at an end for me, if this be true”.

This myth illustrates the precariousness of the Beltaine season, at the threshold of Summer, the earth awakening, winter can still reach its long arm in and snatch the Sun away (Gwri of the Golden hair). “Ne’er cast a clout ’til May be out” (clout: Old English for cloth/clothing). If indeed the return of summer is true than the trouble (winter) is certainly over, however one must be vigilant.

Wiccan Lore

For the rest of this article please click on this  link: http://www.angelfire.com/wa3/angelline/beltaine_lore.htm

Beltane by Herne

April 30th / May 1 – Beltane
Also known as Roodmas or May Day

Many Wiccans and Pagans celebrate Beltane.  It is one of eight solar Sabbats.  This holiday incorporates traditions from the Gaelic Bealtaine, such as the bonfire, but it bears more relation to the Germanic May Day festival, both in its significance (focusing on fertility) and its rituals (such as May pole dancing).  Some traditions celebrate this holiday on May 1 or May day, whiles others begin their celebration the eve before or April 30th.

Beltane has long been celebrated with feasts and rituals. The name means fire of Bel; Belinos being one name for the Sun God, whose coronation feast we now celebrate. As summer begins, weather becomes warmer, and the plant world blossoms, an exuberant mood prevails. In old Celtic traditions it was a time of unabashed sexuality and promiscuity where marriages of a year and a day could be undertaken but it is rarely observed in that manner in modern times

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: https://wicca.com/celtic/akasha/beltane.htm

Walpurgisnacht Beltane Celebration

In honor of Lady Beltane and her birthday on May 1st, I want to write about a celebration in Germany and most of Northern Europe.

In parts of Germanic Europe, “Walpurgisnacht” is celebrated each year around April 30th, right around the time of Beltane, which is celebrated on May 1st. The festival is named for a Catholic saint who lived a number of years as a Nun in the Frankish empire approxamitally in the year 748. Overtime the celebration of St. Walpurga blended with the Pagan Viking celebration of Spring and Walpurgsnacht was born.

Much like Samhain, six months later Walpurgsnacht is a time to communicate with the Spirit World and The Fae.

Bonfires were traditionally lit to keep away malevolent spirits or those who might do mischief. This is known as a night on which Witches and Sorcerers gather together to do magic, although this tradition appears to be heavily influenced by 16th and 17th German writings.

Today, some Pagans in central and Northern Europe still celebrate Walpurgsnacht as a precursor to Beltane. Although it is named for a martyred saint, many Germanic Pagans try to honor the celebrations of their ancestors by observing this traditional holiday each year. It is typically celebrated with lots of dancing, singing, music Ritual all night around a bonfire, in which Pagans welcome in Spring and new birth after the long cold winter.

To read more on this celebration click on the link:

http//www.paganwiccan.about.com/Walpurgisnacht

Fest300 – Walpurgisnacht Festival

In Germany Walpurgisnacht the night from April 30 to May 1st is the night when Witches are reputed to hold a large celebration  on the Brocken mountain and await the arival of spring.

Brocken is the highest of the Harz Mountains of North central Germany. It’s noted for the phenomenon of the Brocken spectre. The Brocken spectre is a magnified shadow of an observer, typically surrounded by rainbow-like bands, thrown into a bank of clouds in high mountain areas when the sun is low. The phenomenon was first reported on the Brocken.

To read more on this article click on the link:

http//www.fest300.com/Walpurgisnach

Also read:

http//www.paganprincesses.com/walpurgis-night

Brightest Blessings Sisters and Brothers,

SunRay Sorceress

Beltane – 2015

“Beltane – Love in Abundance”

“Beltane falls on the first day of May. Some folks celebrate on May Eve with a bonfire, which is fitting  since Beltane is a fire festival derived from a word for “bright fire.” Others observe the holiday at noon, with the spring-time sun serving as fire.

Beltane can be a boisterous and bawdy holiday since it focuses on abundance, fertility, and love. The God and Goddess, who are at the height of their power and vigor, join together in passion to bring life back to earth. Pagans often celebrate with feasting, a dance around the Maypole, and all acts sensual and sexual.

But Beltane isn’t just about lust and romance – it also celebrates abundance, growth, and increase. If you need to bring more of anything into your life – money, love, health – this is a good time to do that type of magickal work. It is also a good time to show love for your significant other, family, friends, pets, or even our Mother, the Earth.

Instead of a Maypole, try using a May bush. (Plant a new ooon or use as exisiting bush or potted plant.) Tie ribbons on to it to symbolize the things you wish to increase in your life and dance with joy, your heart filled with love.”

Copyright Deborah Blake Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2015 Page 61