Lughnasadh Correspondences

Lughnasadh plate

The plate I painted for Lughnasadh.

Lughnasadh Altar 8-8-15

This is the altar I set up last year outside when I did a solitary ritual for Lughnasadh that I had written.

Lughnasadh Altar 2016

Here is a photo of my altar for Lughnasadh this year.

Lughnasadh Altar in a cup

Lughnasadh Altar in a Cup

Echinacea-Earth/ Inner strength

Juniper Berries-Air/ Get rid of negative or unwanted energies

Peppermint-Fire/ Abundance and opens up the breath and heart chakra and revives the mind

Raspberry Leaf-Water/ Protection

Here is a link with a lot of information for Lughnasadh:

https://www.goddessandgreenman.co.uk/lammas

Here is a link for a solo ritual for Lughnasadh:

https://spirallingleaf.wordpress.com/2016/07/27/lammas-lughnasadh-first-harvest-solo-ritual-circle-of-pagans/

Golden Lion Anointing Oil for Lughnasadh

2 drops Frankincense-Base

6 drops Geranium-Middle

2 drop Pettigrain-Top

3 drop Lime-Top

2 drop Sweet Orange-Top

Place 3 Tiger eye crystals in the bottle and then mix the oils with 1 t of Almond Oil.   Good to use at Lammas or in August, since it combines Leo and Sun energies.  Put on Flower of Life grid on top of Holly and place a Scapolite stone on top of the bottle.  Place Sunstone and Honey Calcite in the Merkaba shape and activate the grid.

Lughnasadh Oils

Lughnassadh Oil
2 parts lime oil
2 parts cinnamon oil
2 parts sandalwood oil
1 part clove oil
1 part frankincense oil

Mix well and bottle. Use in Lughnasadh/Lammas rituals.

Golden Lion Oil

Ingredients:

3 parts Frankincense

3 parts Petitgrain

2 parts Lime

1 parts Sweet Orange

Mix the above into 1/8 cup carrier oil such as jojoba, apricot, grapeseed, almond, etc. Good to use at Lammas or in August, since it combines Leo and Sun energies.

Lammas Oil #2

Ingredients:

1/4 dram thyme oil

1/2 dram cinnamon oil

1/4 dram rose oil

1/2 dram gardenia oil

2 – 3 drops allspice oil

Mix well and bottle. Use in Lughnasadh/Lammas rituals.

Lammas Oil #3

Ingredients:

2 tsp. wheat germ oil

6 drops frankincense oil

2 drops clary sage oil

1 drop rose oil

sunflower oil to make 2 TB.

Mix well and bottle. Use in Lughnasadh/Lammas rituals.

Leo Oil #1

To 2 ounces of base oil add 2 tablespoons of any of the following herbs: red sandalwood, frankincense, camphor, cassia, clove, goldenrod, greater celandine, eyebright, goats rue, chamomile, sunflower. Steep one moon cycle or for 12 – 24 hrs. on low in a slow cooker. If stronger scent is desired, remove herbs and repeat. Crack in 2 vitamin E capsules if preservative is desired. This is a good oil to use in rituals done during the zodiac sign of Leo.

Leo Oil #2

Ingredients:

3 drops Petitgrain

1 drop Orange

1 drop Lime

This is a good oil to use in rituals done during the zodiac sign of Leo or wear as a personal oil to increase your own powers.

Leo Zodiac Oil Blend
color – orange yellow

Ingredients:

frankincense (main)

sandalwood (minor)

orange (minor)

musk (minor)

patchouli (minor)

cinnamon (trace)

Add tiger’s eye or ruby to bottle. (Herbs and roots can be used to color the oil, if an all-natural product is desired. This list is from Jeanne Rose’s “Herbs and Things”: Orange Dye: annatto, gamboge or marigold.)

©07282016 Wolf Woman Ways

History of Wicca and Paganism

Discussion of animism, early polytheism, duality in gods and goddesses, the burning times and witch hunts in Europe, Gerald Gardner and the introduction of Wicca, and several authors well-known in modern Paganism.

1 SUBCATEGORIES IN HISTORY OF WICCA AND PAGANISM

To read the rest of this article by Patti Wigington please click on this link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/wiccanpaganhistory/

Practicing as a Solitary Pagan

Many contemporary Wiccans and other Pagans find that rather than joining a group, they prefer practicing as a solitary. The reasons for this as are as varied as those who walk the path – some may find that they work better by themselves, while others who wish to join a coven may be limited by geography or family and job obligations. Regardless, there are a number of things to keep in mind if you’re considering – or have already found your way to – a path as a solitary Wiccan or Pagan.

Covens vs. Solitaries

For some people, it’s hard to make the decision to practice as a solitary. For others, it’s a no-brainer. Both methods have their benefits, and you can always change your mind if you find that one isn’t working for you. Some of the advantages of practicing as a solitary Pagan include setting your own schedule, working at your own pace, and not having to deal with the dynamics of coven relationships. The downside, of course, is that you’re working alone, and at some point, you may find yourself wishing you had someone to tell you where to go and what to do next in order to expand your knowledge.

For the rest of this article by Patty Wigington please click on the following link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/pagantraditions/a/Practicing-As-A-Solitary-Pagan.htm

Coven Life & Group Practice

Interested in coven life or some other form of group practice? A lot of people are, so we’re going to take a few minutes this week to look at some of the unique issues you need to keep in mind when seeking out and joining an existing coven – as well as what to do if you think you want to start your own! If you prefer to stay a solitary – and many people do – don’t feel left out, because we’ll be discussing that in next Friday’s newsletter!

Benefits of Coven or Group Practice  
While it’s a good idea to never overlook the potential problems of joining a coven or group, it’s also important to recognize that there are many wonderful things you can gain by being part of one. A coven is like a second family – and unlike your real family, you get to choose who is in it with you! Let’s look at some of the reasons you might wish to find a Wiccan coven or other Pagan group to join.

For the rest of this article by Patty Wigington please click on the following link:

  http://link.about.com/view/555adff05e7b8f68388b4ded3ml80.zk2/a5d6729a

Covens vs. Solitary Practice

It’s an argument that comes up frequently in the Pagan community, particularly among those who identify as Wiccans. There’s one school of thought that says “only a witch can make a witch,” which means you must be initiated and part of a coven — typically a lineaged one — before you can claim to be Wiccan, Pagan, or any other variety thereof. There’s another camp that says anyone can be a witch or Pagan, and what matters more than initiation and coven connections is what’s in your heart and soul.

Will people ever agree on these things?

It’s pretty unlikely.

However, as you begin your studies of Wicca and other forms of Paganism, you may at some point be offered the opportunity to join a group. You may also find that you really prefer working alone. Let’s take a look at some of the pros and cons of covens vs. solitary practice, so that when the time comes for you to make a decision, you can do so with some knowledge under your belt.

For the rest of this article by Patty Wigington please click on the following link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/wiccaandpaganismbasics/a/CovenVsSolitary.htm

Back to Basics: Getting Started – Part 5

No matter how long you’ve been following a Pagan belief system – or considering following one – it never hurts to go back to the basics occasionally. This gives us an opportunity to recharge ourselves spiritually, mentally, and emotionally. Your end goals may change over time, but whether you’ve been exploring Paganism for two weeks or two decades, it’s always a good idea to remember what drew you here in the first place. Let’s take a look at our five most popular articles for beginning Pagans.

Wicca, Witchcraft or Paganism?

Question: What’s the difference between Paganism, Wicca and Witchcraft?

A reader asks, I met a woman who is a witch, but she says she’s not Wiccan. Then there’s some guy I know who says all Pagans are Wiccans. Even more confusing, this site says Wicca AND Paganism, like it’s two different things. What’s going on?

Answer:

Wicca is a tradition of Witchcraft that was brought to the public byGerald Gardner in the 1950s.

There is a great deal of debate among the Pagan community about whether or not Wicca is truly the same form of Witchcraft that the ancients practiced. Regardless, many people use the terms Wicca and Witchcraft interchangeably.Paganism is an umbrella term used to apply to a number of different earth-based faiths. Wicca falls under that heading, although not all Pagans are Wiccan.

So, in a nutshell, here’s what’s going on. All Wiccans are witches, but not all witches are Wiccans. All Wiccans are Pagans, but not all Pagans are Wiccans. Finally, somewitches are Pagans, but some are not – and some Pagans practice witchcraft, while others choose not to.

 If you’re reading this page, chances are you’re either a Wiccan or Pagan, or you’re someone who’s interested in learning more about the modern Pagan movement. You may be a parent who’s curious about what your child is reading, or you might be someone who is unsatisfied with the spiritual path you’re on right now. Perhaps you’re seeking something more than what you’ve had in the past. You might be someone who’s practiced Wicca or Paganism for years, and who just wants to learn more.

For many people, the embracing of an earth-based spirituality is a feeling of “coming home”. Often, people say that when they first discovered Wicca, they felt like they finally fit in. For others, it’s a journey TO something new, rather than running away from something else.

For the rest of this article by Patty Wigington please click on the following link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/wiccaandpaganismbasics/a/WWPDiffs.htm?utm_content=20160202&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Back to Basics: Getting Started – Part 4

No matter how long you’ve been following a Pagan belief system – or considering following one – it never hurts to go back to the basics occasionally. This gives us an opportunity to recharge ourselves spiritually, mentally, and emotionally. Your end goals may change over time, but whether you’ve been exploring Paganism for two weeks or two decades, it’s always a good idea to remember what drew you here in the first place. Let’s take a look at our five most popular articles for beginning Pagans.

5 Mistakes New Pagans Make – and How To Avoid Them

For people new to Pagan spirituality, there is often a sense of elation and joy – after all, you’ve finally found that elusive sense of belonging that you’ve been looking for all this time! However, with that elation and joy sometimes comes bad decision-making rooted in enthusiasm. Here are a few common mistakes that new Pagans – and a few veterans – often make. Let’s take a look at what they are, and how you can avoid these pitfalls and traps.

Back to Basics: Getting Started – Part 3

No matter how long you’ve been following a Pagan belief system – or considering following one – it never hurts to go back to the basics occasionally. This gives us an opportunity to recharge ourselves spiritually, mentally, and emotionally. Your end goals may change over time, but whether you’ve been exploring Paganism for two weeks or two decades, it’s always a good idea to remember what drew you here in the first place. Let’s take a look at our five most popular articles for beginning Pagans.

Basic Principles and Concepts of Wicca

There’s an old saying that if you ask any ten Wiccans about their religion, you’ll get at least fifteen different answers. That’s not far from the truth, because with hundreds of thousands of Americans practicing Wicca today (and the actual numbers are unclear), there are thousands of different Wiccan groups out there. There is no one governing body over Wicca, nor is there a “Bible” that lays down a universal set of guidelines.

While specifics vary from one tradition to the next, there are actually a few ideals and beliefs common to nearly all modern Wiccan groups.

Do keep in mind that this article is primarily focused on Wiccan traditions, rather than on the principles of non-Wiccan Pagan belief systems. Not all Pagans are Wiccans, and not all Pagan traditions have the same set of principles as the core beliefs of modern Wicca.

Origins of Wicca…

For the rest of this article by Patty Wigington please click on the following link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/wiccaandpaganismbasics/p/Wiccan_Basics.htm?utm_content=20160202&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_term=list_paganwiccan