Flower Petal Spell Paper

Its time to break out the fun stuff guys! Magick User’s University is all about interesting crafts that can be useful during your travel through the world of Magick. Today, we’re going to focus on a project of making Flower Petal Spell Paper today in Spellcraft 101.
+ So what is Flower Petal Spell Paper?
Well, its a fancy name for paper with flower petals in it. There are a lot of great things you can use it for besides spellcraft, such as scrapbooking, making bookmarks, and other crafts. It all depends on how many flower petals you put in it, and exactly what purpose this paper is for.
+ Flower Petal Spell Paper +
The Flower Petal Spell Paper is great for spellcraft and writing, as well as looking generally beautiful for any papercraft you have in mind.
+ Materials +
Flower Petals (in any color!)
Any kind of paper (construction, newspaper, etc)
Scissors
Duct tape
Window screen (or anything like that)
Towels
Bowls
Blender
The Flower Petal Spell Paper will be used for a particular endeavor in particular: making earth spells. For these particular spells, you write out an endeavor, wish, or project that you would like to see come true or flourish, and then you bury the small spell paper in the ground in efforts to promote your desires! Its a great gift for someone, or just to keep for yourself. Below I’ll have a few suggestions written out in case you would like to present them as gifts.
+ One: Time for the hunt! Even as witches, most people are more likely to spend their time indoors (I know I do). So, time to go out and take a walk! Collect as many flower petals as you can! In efforts to help with my enthusiasm, I took a few plastic cups with me (along with my darling Lore), and we set out on the journey of collecting flowers.
 Beautiful red flowers! I fell in love with the the moment I saw them!

 

The mighty Lore Sagemaker, forced to pick cute yellow flowers. ♥

 

+ Two: After collecting your bounty, head back. Cut out a square of screen, and fold the duct tape around the edges to form a stable frame. If you want, you can use something like popsicle sticks to make a frame and tape around that.
+ Three: Once you’ve made your screen, tear up some paper and stick it in the blender. Cover it with enough water to saturate the paper. And then! Whirl away, until its a nice, thin porridge/oatmeal like substance.
As for me, I actually don’t own a blender, so I got to watch Lore use one of her top-notch cooking utensils and beat away. She did a good job.

 

 

 

You’ll actually want it a bit more thin than the end result here… but this was as good as we were getting without a blender. Anyway, it will work just fine, but the paper won’t be as fine and thin (though I was surprised at how nice it turned out regardless). At this point, mix in the flower petals with the soupy substance and get it nice and mixed in there. If you have anything else, like seeds, this is the time to do it as well! You can also add a hint of cinnamon in order to make it smell nice!
+ Four: Using a spoon, spoon some of the mixture onto the frame. Smooth it out, using the back of the spoon to press out some of the water through the screen. Make sure to push any of the mixture off the frame and onto the screen.
+ Five: After getting the mix onto the screen, very, very carefully tip the screen over onto a towel (mixture down). Put another towel over and and press down on it to get rid of the excess water. Hold it for at least thirty seconds, continually dabbing. Once you’ve cone that, very slowly peel the screen away, until on the towel you have this!

 

Pretty neat, huh? Continue this process until you’ve finished with all of the paper.
+ Six: Once you’ve finished, transfer them carefully to a cookie sheet and leave them to dry outside. And you’re done! Now you have it! Gorgeous flower petal spell paper!
So what do you do with it afterwards?
If you’re planning on giving it as a small little gift to a friend, something general and heartfelt is always a great way to go. You can even write them instructions on a separate sheet of paper, telling them what to do with the spell paper. Tear the sheets into thin strips. On the paper itself, in ink, you can write either a notion, or a spell! Listed below are a few ideas. Think about what the person you are giving it to might need and attempt to cater it to them!
Good Luck
Sweet Dreams
Fortune
Good Health
Make a Wish
“Bring _____ (their name) fortune and prosperity, By this spell so mote it be.”
“Buried deep into the earth, Grow the seeds of wishes true.”
You can present it to them anyway you’d like afterwards. The project is a bit of work, but when you see the end results and how beautiful it looks, it will be worth it! ♥
FROM: http://universitywitch.blogspot.com/2011/05/spellcraft-101-flower-petal-spell-paper.html

 

Flower Magic: The Secret Language Of The Flowers

There are many things that were known only about a hundred years ago that have become lost, and the secret language of the flowers is one of them. In days gone by it was held an important part of women’s education to know home remedies, about the qualities of plants and this had a large metaphysical component.

Just knowing that there is a secret language of flowers changes many things; and of course has many applications in practical as well as esoteric magic and energy magic.

Right up to Victorian times, the meaning of flowers was common knowledge amongst people and was used to transmit messages and information.

In this painting which looks so harmless to a modern Westerner and merely decorative, there is story told in flowers about the person who painted it, and the person for whom they painted it. That’s a second layer of information, invisible to those who are not in the know; because of this it is called the secret language of flowers.

If you look for it, you will find flowers everywhere – they appear seemingly harmlessly and randomly in portraits, in the background of stained glass windows in a church; they are carved in stone in palaces and temples; and often you will see a depiction of saints and important historical figures who are holding a flower, or are pointing to one.

On a visit to an old graveyard, you can tell the plants that were chosen to be on a person’s grave, using the secret language of flowers – and the vast majority of people walk right by and have no idea that all of that is going on.

Importantly, flowers were used to express emotions, especially in romantic relationships. Gentlemen would bring posies to the ladies; and the ladies would wear very specific flowers on their hats, or choose or make fabrics that would bear particular flower motives.

Any fabric pre-dating the Second World War has this language of flowers, this additional meaning and information, interwoven into its very structure; this is practical magic where intention is added to a natural existence and used intelligently in order to bring about a change in reality.Flower language magic sleep cushion

For example, if you put on a cushion a design that says in the language of flowers, “If you put your head on this cushion to rest, you will have sweet dreams of love, independence, freedom and joy,” that’s a pure piece of human magic or witchcraft at work. For people who actively practice the art of bringing intention into daily life and shaping their own destiny that way, the language of flowers, that secret layer of intention, energy and information, provides a dictionary of symbols that can be practically evoked in spells and rituals, in magic potions by adding the physical components of that particular flower to the spell.

If you learn the secret language of the flowers, you have a magical alphabet to make your own spells; this is how most of magic works, you don’t learn a bunch of spells and ingredients by heart, but instead, you learn what the ingredients do and so you can mix and match for every occasion.

Flower language in a portrait - a picture that says more ...For example, one of the only surviving flower language symbols is that of the red rose for romantic love. People might nowadays have absolutely no idea what a bluebell was meant to mean only a hundred years ago, or even what a Valerian flower looks like, never mind where you could find one or what its flower language message is, but it is still known that a red rose means love.

Knowing that, you can add the petals of a red rose to any love potion that has a physical/sexual strand to it; and also to any other type of potion where a physical/sexual strand would add a bit of va va voom to the spell in question.

As always, knowing even a little bit about magic opens your eyes, ears and your other senses to the simple fact that there is more to life than the dour ones would have us believe.

Wondering what was said about this lady in the portrait here by the flowers makes meeting with this image in a whole new way. Modern science will have us believe that our ancestors were all a bunch of idiots who believed in superstitious nonsense and that there is no such thing as the invisible worlds of energy and information.

I’m afraid they are the fools; and it’s a shame because the world becomes a much more interesting place when you pay attention and find out about such things as the secret language of the flowers, and how this has been used throughout the ages of mankind to tell us things most people now will never understand.

And if you make the secret language of the flowers your own, you can do many interesting, inspiring and wonderful things with that – even if it’s just choosing a wallpaper that has the right flowers for your purposes on it, and smiling every day when you see it again.

Below is a very short version of the secret language of flowers; for a much more comprehensive flower language dictionary from A-Z with a search function and a reverse list so you can decide the quality/meaning you need and then look up the right flower or plant, go here:

See the complete “Secret Language Of The Flowers” here.

Wishing you much joy with The Secret Language Of The Flowers,

SFX

Spring 2011

Flower Language: The Secret Language Of Flowers
See the complete “Secret Language Of The Flowers” here.

Amaranthus Immortal
Amaryllis Beautiful, but timid
Aster, double Variety
Aster, single Afterthought
Arbutus Thee only do I love
Acacia Friendship
Apple Blossom Preference
Asphodel Remembered after death
Arbor Vitæ (Tree of Life) Unchanging friendship
Alyssum Worth beyond beauty
Anemone Your love changes
Azalea Pleasant recollections
Argeratum Worth beyond beauty
Balsam Impatience
Blue Bell Constancy
Balm Pleasantry
Bay I change but in death
Bachelor’s Button Hope
Begonia Deformed
Buttercup Memories of childhood
Brier, Sweet Envy
Calla Feminine Modesty
Carnation Pride
Clematis Mental Excellence
Cypress Disappointment, Despair
Crocus Happiness
Columbine I cannot give thee up
Cresses Always cheerful
Canterbury Bell Constancy
Cereus, Night-blooming Transient beauty
Candytuft Indifference
Chrysanthemum Heart left desolate
Clover, White I promise
Clover, Four-leaved Be mine
Crown Imperial Authority
Camellia Spotless purity
Cissus Changeable
Centaurea Your looks deceive me
Cineraria Singleness of heart
Daisy, Field I will think of it
Dahlia Dignity
Daffodil Unrequited love
Dandelion Coquetry
Everlasting Always remembered
Everlasting Pea Wilt thou go with me
Ebony Blackness
Fuchsia Humble love
Foxglove Insincerity
Fern Sincerity
Fennel Strength
Forget-me-not For ever remembered
Fraxinella Fire
Geranium, Ivy Fond of dancing
Geranium, Oak A melancholy mind
Geranium, Rose I prefer you
Geranium, Scarlet Stillness
Gladiolus Ready armed
Golden Rod Encouragement
Gillyflower Promptness
Hyacinth Benevolence
Honeysuckle Devoted love
House Leek Domestic economy
Heliotrope I adore you
Hibiscus Delicate beauty
Hollyhock Ambition
Hydrangea Vain glory
Ice Plant Your looks freeze me
Ivy Friendship
Iris A message for thee
Jonquil Affection returned
Larkspur Fickleness
Lantana Rigor
Laurel Words may deceive
Lavender Mistrust
Lemon Blossom Discretion
Lady Slipper Capricious beauty
Lily of the Valley Return of happiness
Lily Passion
May Flower Welcome
Marigold Sacred affection
Marigold and Cypress Despair
Mandrake Rarity
Mignonette Your qualities surpass your charms
Morning Glory Coquetry, Affectation
Myrtle Love in absence
Mistletoe Insurmountable
Narcissus Egotism
Nasturtium Patriotism
Oxalis Reverie
Orange Blossom Purity
Olive Peace
Oleander Beware
Primrose Modest worth
Pink, White Pure love
Pink, Red Devoted love
Phlox Our hearts are united
Periwinkle Sweet memories
Pæony Ostentation
Pansy You occupy my thoughts
Poppy Oblivion
Rhododendron Agitation
Rose, Bud White Maiden love
Rose, Leaf I never trouble
Rose Moss Superior merit
Rose, Red I love you
Rose, Yellow Infidelity
Rosemary Remembrance
Sensitive Plant Modesty
Snowdrop Consolation
Sumach Pride and poverty
Sweet William Gallantry
Sunflower Lofty thought
Tuberose Purity of mind
Thyme Activity
Tulip Declaration of love
Verbena Sensibility
Violet, Blue Faithfulness
Wall Flower Fidelity in misfortune
Wisteria Close friendship
Yucca Your looks pierce me
Yew Sadness
Zinnia I mourn your absence
See the complete“Secret Language Of The Flowers”

Thoughts for Today – FLOWER QUOTES

Flowers and fruits are always fit presents; flowers, because they are a proud assertion that a ray of beauty outvalues all of the utilities of the world. These gay natures contrast with the somewhat stern countenance of ordinary nature: they are like music heard out of a work-house.

RALPH WALDO EMERSON, Essays

Our highest assurance of the goodness of Providence seems to me to rest in the flowers. All other things, our powers, our desires, our food, are all really necessary for our existence in the first instance. But this rose is an extra. Its smell and its color are an embellishment of life, not a condition of it. It is only goodness which gives extras, and so I say again that we have much to hope from the flowers.

SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE, The Naval Treaty

I would far rather have two or three lilies of the valley gathered for me by a person I like, than the most expensive bouquet that could be bought!

ELIZABETH GASKELL, Wives and Daughters

We grow like flowers, and bear desire, The odor of the human flowers.

RICHARD HENRY STODDARD, The Squire of Low Degree–The Princess Answers

Flowers have an expression of countenance as much as men and animals. Some seem to smile; some have a sad expression; some are pensive and diffident; others again are plain, honest and upright, like the broad-faced sunflower and the hollyhock.

HENRY WARD BEECHER, Star Papers

Flowers are words which even a babe may understand.

ARTHUR CLEVELAND COXE, The Singing of Birds

I love to smell flowers in the dark … You get hold of their soul then.

LUCY MAUD MONTGOMERY, Anne’s House of Dreams

I hate flowers — I paint them because they’re cheaper than models and they don’t move.

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, New York Herald Tribune, Apr. 18, 1954

Flowers … that are so pathetic in their beauty, frail as the clouds, and in their colouring as gorgeous as the heavens, had through thousands of years been the heritage of children—honoured as the jewellery of God only by them—when suddenly the voice of Christianity, counter-signing the voice of infancy, raised them to a grandeur transcending the Hebrew throne, although founded by God himself, and pronounced Solomon in all his glory not to be arrayed like one of these.

THOMAS DE QUINCEY, Confessions of an English Opium-Eater

Flowers grow out of dark moments.

CORITA KENT, Moments of 1984

Farewell deare flowers, sweetly your time ye spent,Fit, while ye liv’d, for smell or ornament,And after death for cures.

GEORGE HERBERT, Life

Flowers have spoken to me more than I can tell in written words. They are the hieroglyphics of angels, loved by all men for the beauty of the character, though few can decypher even fragments of their meaning.

LYDIA MARIA CHILD, Letters from New York

Many people have never learned to see the beauty of flowers, especially those that grow unnoticed. For instance, when you walk outside and look down at your feet, you may see tiny flowers nestled in the moss and clover hiding under a curled fern. Most people just step on them. I paint them.

ERIKA JUST, Flowers

Happy is the man who can with vigorous wingMount to those luminous serene fields!The man whose thoughts, like larks,Take liberated flight toward the morning skies–Who hovers over life and understands without effortThe language of flowers and voiceless things!

CHARLES BAUDELAIRE, “Elevation”

What this old world needs is more bouquets handed around to folks when they are alive and kicking. Flowers don’t do a dead one much good.

ROBERT ELLIOTT GONZALES, Poems and Paragraphs

Our finest flowers are often weeds transplanted.

ELBERT HUBBARD, The American Bible

Flowers are the sweetest things that God ever made, and forgot to put a soul into.

HENRY WARD BEECHER, Proverbs from Plymouth Pulpit

Full many a flower is born to blush unseen.

JAMES JOYCE, Ulysses

The flower fades that is not looked upon.

EDWARD COUNSEL, Maxims

Shed no tear! O shed no tear!The flower will bloom another year.Weep no more! O weep no more!Young buds sleep in the root’s white core.

JOHN KEATS, “Faery Songs”

Flowers are the music of the groundFrom earth’s lips spoken without sound.

EDWIN CURRAN, “Flowers”

Dear common flower, that grow’st beside the way,Fringing the dusty road with harmless gold,First pledge of blithesome May,Which children pluck, and, full of pride uphold.

JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL, To the Dandelion

There are always flowers for those who want to see them.

HENRI MATISSE, attributed, The Colour of Love

Earth laughs in flowers.

RALPH WALDO EMERSON, “Hamatreya”

Full many a flower is born to blush unseen,And waste its sweetness on the desert air.

THOMAS GRAY, “An Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard”

I’d go without food if I could have a flower.

CARYL CHURCHILL, A Dream Play

Browse Flower Quotes II

Flower – Wikipedia article.

SAF – Society of American Florists.

The Wild Flower Society – society for amateur botanists in the UK.

Read T. Augustus Forbes Leith’s short essay: On Flowers

Read more at http://www.notable-quotes.com/f/flowers_quotes.html#rpvCBkHQz5qSM2xE.99

Meaning of Some Types of Flowers

Flowers have always been a big feature at weddings, too. As an example, look to the royal flower bouquet in the wedding of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, to Kate Middleton (now Catherine, Ducchess of Cambridge). Her flowers had very special meaning.

The groom, too, wears a flower that appears in the bridal bouquet in his button-hole. This stems from the Medieval tradition of wearing his Lady’s colors, as a declaration of his love.

One fun idea is to have a garden gathering and have each person bring a flower that has meaning to them. Or, paint tiles on a kitchen island with a flower that represents each of your loved ones.

There is a language, little known,
Lovers claim it as their own.
Its symbols smile upon the land,
Wrought by nature’s wondrous hand;
And in their silent beauty speak,
Of life and joy, to those who seek
For Love Divine and sunny hours
In the language of the flowers.

–The Language of Flowers, London, 1875

Please tell us which flowers have meaning to you! If we are missing one of your favorites, please tell us which one and its meaning.

Wish to grow a flower that has meaning to you or a loved one? Click on the linked plant names for free planting and growing guides.

Symbolic Meanings of Herbs, Flowers and Trees
Aloe Healing, protection, affection
Angelica Inspiration
Arborvitae Unchanging friendship
Bachelor’s button Single blessedness
Basil Good wishes
Bay Glory
Black-eyed Susan Justice
Carnation Alas for my poor heart
Chamomile Patience
Chives Usefulness
Chrysanthemum Cheerfulness
Clover, white Think of me
Coriander Hidden worth
Crocus, spring Youthful gladness
Cumin Fidelity
Daffodil Regard
Daisy Innocence, hope
Dill Powerful against evil
Edelweiss Courage, devotion
Fennel Flattery
Fern Sincerity
Forget-me-not Forget-me-not
Geranium, oak-leaved True friendship
Goldenrod Encouragement
Heliotrope Eternal love
Holly Hope
Hollyhock Ambition
Honeysuckle Bonds of love
Horehound Health
Hyacinth Constancy of love, fertility
Hyssop Sacrifice, cleanliness
Iris A message
Ivy Friendship, continuity
Jasmine, white Sweet love
Lady’s-mantle Comforting
Lavender Devotion, virtue
Lemon balm Sympathy
Lilac Joy of youth
Lily-of-the-valley Sweetness
Marjoram Joy and happiness
Mint Virtue
Morning glory Affection
Myrtle The emblem of marriage, true love
Nasturtium Patriotism
Oak Strength
Oregano Substance
Pansy Thoughts
Parsley Festivity
Pine Humility
Poppy, red Consolation
Rose, red Love, desire
Rosemary Remembrance
Rue Grace, clear vision
Sage Wisdom, immortality
Salvia, blue I think of you
Salvia, red Forever mine
Savory Spice, interest
Sorrel Affection
Southernwood Constancy, jest
Sweet pea Pleasures
Sweet William Gallantry
Sweet woodruff Humility
Tansy Hostile thoughts
Tarragon Lasting interest
Thyme Courage, strength
Tulip, red Declaration of love
Valerian Readiness
Violet Loyalty, devotion, faithfulness
Willow Sadness
Yarrow Everlasting love
Zinnia Thoughts of absent friends

Credit: KafeKafe

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