Faeries in the Garden

Faeries in the Garden

In some NeoPagan traditions, the Fae are often welcomed and celebrated. In particular, the Beltane season is believed to be a time when the veil between our world and that of the Fae is thin.

It is important to note that the Fae are typically considered mischievous and tricky, and should not be interacted with unless one knows exactly what one is up against. Don’t make offerings or promises that you can’t follow through on, and don’t enter into any bargains with the Fae unless you know exactly what you’re getting – and what is expected of you in return.

If your tradition is one that celebrates the magical link between mortals and Faeries, you may want to take advantage of the fertile Beltane season to invite the Fae into your garden. Here are some ways you can make your outdoor space welcoming to the Fae.

  • Build small houses or caves out of stones in your yard. Tuck them into hidden places under bushes, or in your flower garden.
  • Craft small wooden chairs and tables to place outside. Paint them in bright colors, and wrap them in ivy or other vining plants.
  • Some people believe the Fae are attracted to water. Place a birdbath or a small wishing well as an inviting spot for Faeries.
  • Create a circle of stones as a magical place for the Fae.
  • Faeries are often associated with the sound of bells. Make a bell wand and place it in a spot where the breeze with catch it and draw the Fae in, or hang tiny bells from your tree branches.

Some gardeners believe that certain types of flowers are practically magnets for the faerie folk. If you’d like to attract them to your flower garden, plant things like sunflowers, tulips, heliotrope and other flowers that typically draw butterflies. Your herb garden can be a good place for faeries as well, if you include plants such as rosemary, thyme, mugwort, and members of the mint family.

If you’re partial to trees, in addition to your flower and herb gardens, you might want to consider planting tree that are associated with the Fae. Oak trees, in particular, are often linked to faeries, and in some areas it is believed that a great oak is the home of the Faerie King. Another tree to plant for the fae is the hawthorn, which is seen as a portal to the faerie realm. Along with the ash tree, known as a home for faerie clans, the oak and hawthorn form a perfect trifecta of fae-attracting trees.

To see beautiful image incuded in this article by Patti Wigington please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/welcoming-the-fae-at-beltane-2561634

A Brief History of the Hill of Tara: Seat of Secular and Spiritual Power.

A few miles south of Navan, Co. Meath lies the Hill of Tara, the ancient capital of Ireland.

Unlike our modern conception of a capital city, however, Tara appears to have been a symbolic or ritual capital, rather than a large center of commerce, administration, and public life. Evidence of extensive dwelling space or large-scale defensive earthworks have not been found, suggesting its use was primarily ritualistic: it was where one went to be crowned, set down laws, or settle disputes.

For the rest of this article and to follow the rest that the author posted on the subject of the Hill of Tara please click on this link: http://atriptoireland.com/2013/06/26/a-brief-history-of-the-hill-of-tara/

Fairy Cakes with Cream Icing

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Actual fairy cakes are about the size of raspberries [All L. B. side notes appear in [ ]. My granddaughter and I collected larger sized acorn tops (these are used a dishes by Fae Folk) and then bake about 8 fairy size cakes in those. Baking time varies so check them after about 5-7 minutes to see if they are done]. Since it is hard to find baking pans that small, you can bake them in a muffin tin.

INGREDIENTS

500 mL flour 2 cups

10mL Baking Powder 2 teaspoons

5mL Salt 1 teaspoon

175 mL [stick] Butter 3/4 cup

375mL White Sugar 1 1/2 cups

3 Eggs 3

5mL Vanilla 1 teaspoon

325 ml Milk 1/13 cup [L.B. Side Note: I found Whole Milk works the best but 2% or Skim will work also]

  1. Grease the muffin tin with a bit of butter [. B. Side Note: You can use muffin liners also]
  2. Sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt.
  3. Cream together the butter and sugar, then add the effs and vanilla. Beat until light and fluffy.
  4. Add a few spoonfuls of dry ingredients then some milk to the cream mixture. Keep alternating ingredients until well mixed.
  5. Fill the muffin cups [and acorn tops if using them] three-quarters full. Bake at 180 degrees C (350 degrees F) for 20-25 minutes. [May take longer depending on your oven]
  6. Let cool before frosting with your favorite icing. [For me it was a light cream cheese frosting made with almond extract instead of vallia]

Copyright 1999 Penelope Larkspur The Secret Life of Fairies