A-Z Dictionary of Fairies and the Wee Folk

A-Z Dictionary of Fairies and the Wee Folk

Updated on June 28, 2018
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Kitty has been independently researching and studying the fae for over 15 years. She enjoys sharing what she’s learned with her readers.

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A-Z Dictionary of Fairies

This is your one-stop shop for all terms and definitions related to fairies and the world of the fay. From letters A to Z, you will find fairies’ terms and definitions right here in this article.

Alven: water fairies found in ponds in the Netherlands, though they don’t have wings. They can, however, fly by being encased in bubbles and traveling on the winds. Main home is the River Elbe, as it is sacred to them. Small fairies, extremely light and sometimes shift into otters.

Ashrays: water fairies from Scotland that are mistaken for sea ghosts; have white bodies and look like a twenty-year-old human, both male and female. Nocturnal fairies, if sunlight hits them they will melt into a rainbow-colored pond of water.

Avalon: a mythological island in the Arthurian legends. The place where excalibur was forged and given to King Arthur, and also the place where King Arthur was taken after being wounded in a battle. Morgan Le Fay and Vivianne are said to have dwelled on the isle of Avalon.

To find out about other Fea please click on this link: Fea and Wee Folk

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Pagan Portals – Fairy Witchcraft A Neopagan’s Guide to the Celtic Fairy Faith

Many neopagans today are drawn to honor the fairies but find that the modern-day path to Fairy is hidden in mist and shadow. Yet the path is still there, waiting for those who are ready to seek it out. This is a guidebook for those seeking a path that combines modern neopagan witchcraft with the older Celtic Fairy Faith. Topics include basic beliefs and practices, holidays, tools, altar set up, and theology, with the intent of giving the seeker a solid grounding in the basics of modern Fairy Witchcraft.

REVIEWS & ENDORSEMENTS

Can you recognize a fairy cat? Morgan Daimler has interacted with Fairies since she was a small child. She views them three-dimensionally, not as the limited New Age/media-interpreted versions that many of us are familiar with. She sees them as they are with their full range of emotions and motivations. Telling it like it is, she recounts her system of Fairy Witchcraft, based on decades of personal experience. She goes back to the roots of Celtic pagan wisdom to put it all into perspective, but it’s clear that the information she conveys is not from “book learning”. It comes from contact with the Fey Folk themselves. This very personal recollection has a special air of enchantment about it. As one reads, it becomes clear that Daimler not only has personal experience with the Wee Folk, she has been completely charmed by them. She has not, however, been deluded by “pixie-led glamour”. She just likes these…

To read the rest of this article please click on the following link: Fea Folk

FAIRIES

The term fairy can be used to describe many types of magical creatures. Most people relate the word fairy to the more ethereal image, the classic fairy with wings and flowing hair. Fairies are human in appearance and they have magical powers, the origin of fairies is the point of much contention as no one can actually say where they originated from.

Fairies are capable of making themselves invisible sometimes, fairies actually fly on the back of birds and they are very in tune with the creatures of the sky. Fairies are very intelligent creatures and their fragility is deceptive, they are actually powerful magicians and very strong mentally and physically.

Children who have imaginary friends are actually talking to fairies, as fairies feel most comfortable with…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Fairiess

The Origins of the Faeries: Encoded in our Cultures – Part I

The faeries appear in folklore from all over the world as metaphysical beings, who, given the right conditions, are able to interact with the physical world. They’re known by many names but there is a conformity to what they represent, and perhaps also to their origins. From the Huldufólk in Iceland to the Tuatha Dé Danann in Ireland, and the Manitou of Native Americans, these are apparently intelligent entities that live unseen beside us, until their occasional manifestations in this world become encoded into our cultures through folktales, anecdotes and testimonies.

The faeries appear in folklore from all over the world as metaphysical beings, who, given the right conditions, are able to interact with the physical world. They’re known by many names but there is a conformity to what they represent, and perhaps also to their origins. From the Huldufólk in Iceland to the Tuatha Dé Danann in Ireland, and the Manitou of Native Americans, these are apparently intelligent entities that live unseen beside us, until their occasional manifestations in this world become encoded into our cultures through folktales, anecdotes and testimonies…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Origins of Faries