Morgan Le Fey Additional Information and Images

I have done a general search on the Goddess Morgan Le Fay so you can look through it and read the articles you want to, to further your knowledge about this Goddess.

Please copy and paste this link into your browser: https://www.bing.com/search?pc=GIWI&form=AMZNS2&q=goddess+morgan+le+fay

Here is a link with images of Morgan Le Fey: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=goddess+morgan+le+fay&FORM=HDRSC2

I hope you find this  new weekly posting of different Goddesses informative and interesting

Week 1 Goddess Knowledge – Morgan Le Fay

“Morgan Le Fey is commonly remembered as the enchanted half-dozen of King Arthur. She is, in fact, the great queen goddess, Tyler of the mystical island of Avalon, the Fortunate Island of the Blessed Dead. Sometimes equated with the ancient Irish warrior goddess Morrigan, she is The Celtic death goddess. As Morgan’s Data she is the controller of destinies and knows the gate of each person. She is noted for her healing powers, her knowledge of healing plants, and her prophetic vision. Like a shaman she is a shape-shifter, able to take on many forms. Morgan Le Fay represents that deep place of healing magic within each of us — the center where wisdom and healing flow even in the moment of dearh. The ambivalence with which she is traditionally represented echoes out own fear of her deep and ancient wisdom.”

WOTC Ritual on September 25, 2018

ANy questions about this ritual should be sent to witches_of_the_craft@outlook.com or a comment made on one of the WOTC posts on the WPTC website http://witchesofthecraft.com for this gathering. You can read all the posts by Lady Abyss by scrolling down this page

WHEN

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Socialization starts at 6:45 PM  CT

Ritual starts at 7:00 PM CT

Lady of the Abyss asks that if you come into theWOTC chatroom late you do so quietly, please.

WHERE:

WOTC Chatroom

Make sure you read the post about how you get into the chatroom

WHAT YOU WILL NEED:

A Chalice with fresh water in it

A dish of  Salt

Sword or Dagger

Wand

Incense Holder

Incense of your choice

4 Element Candles in Celtic Magick the colors are Red for East, White for South, Gray for West, Black for North

Cord

TOPIC OF RITUAL:

“This ritual is done with a Celt flare to it…”

Re-dedication to The Craft, God and Goddess

History of the Ogham Language

HISTORY OF THE OGHAM LANGUAGE
ogham alphabetogham stoneThe ancient Ogham script (pronounced ‘oh-am’) is most often found on Ogham stones that date back to the third century. Most examples of the writing is found on Ogham stones of which there are over 350 found mostly in southern Ireland as well as in Scotland, the Isle of Man, Cornwall and Wales.

The transition to the use of the Roman alphabet took place about the sixth century. Most examples of Ogham writing confer the name of person that they represent, thus the stones are often memorial symbols.

To read the rest of this article please click on the following link: History Ogham Langage

A Short Introduction to Celtic/Druid Ogham or Ogma Alphabet and How to Use it For Divination

The Celtic’s used a writing system called Ogham or sometimes spelled Ogma which dates hundreds of years BCE (Before the Current Era). Most of the time the credit for the alphabets origins are given to the Druid Priests. As only they could read the meanings of the “Ogham Staves” when they were thrown. The Ogham alphabet consists of 25 different symbols which in turn are associated with specific trees or shrubs.

The alphabet can either be written vertically or horizontally but the actual marking for the symbol or letter always appears on the same side and location on the straight line that all the symbols/letter stem off of.

The Ogham Staves are used as a form of divination. You can use them the same as you would Runes or Tarot cards. To make Ogham Staves they should be craved into a piece of the tree or shrub they are associated with, all 25 pieces of wood should be the exact same length and when possible diameter.

How to use the staves is simple you hold them together in both hands, and roll them on your palms while you ask your question of them (be sure to keep your question clear and concise). When you feel it is time and with the question firmly fixed in your mind you let the staves drop from about 4 to 6 inches off the ground. Those closest to you are the future, the middle ones are for the present, and those furthest away are read for the past which led up to the present which will lead into the future.

Here is a picture of the alphabet writing, name of symbol/letter, and which tree or shrub is associated to it:

Other examples of the alphabet:

Here is are the symbols/letters on the tree or shrub they are associated with:

This is the first in a series of posts on the use and meanings of the Ogham alphabet and staves. I will also be posting an Ogham Symbol for the day starting Monday, August 13th both on here and on WOTC.

If you have questions about this topic please write to LAdy Beltane at covenlifescoven@gmail.com Please put Ogham Question in the “Subject line”

 

Willow ~ a tree witch

Willow

Willows which by water stand
Ease us to the Summerland.

 

Salix alba

Tree of Enchantment, Tree of Witcheries

Fifth month of the Celtic Tree calendar, 

April 15th – May 12th

 

Fifth consonant of the Ogham alphabet – Saille


Saille Ogham

Planet: Moon

Element: Water

Symbolism: Resonance and Harmony

Stone: Moonstone

Birds: Hawk, Snowy Owl

Color: Silver

Deity: Persephone, Hecate, Cerridwen, 

Artemis, Selene, Luna, Diana, Brigit

Sabbat: Beltane

Folk names: Osier, Pussy Willow, Saille, Salicyn Willow, Saugh Tree, White Willow, 

Witches Aspirin, Withe, Withy

 

Medicinal properties

Willow bark contains salicin, or Salicylic acid, used to make aspirin. 

Infusions from the bark have long been used as a remedy for cholls, rheumatism, and fevers. 

Willow sap applied to the skin can remedy acne, and a strong decoction of boiling 

the bark and leaves in water can be rubbed into the scalp for dandruff.

 

Magickal properties

New Moon magick, creativity, fertility, female rights of passage, inspiration, emotion, binding. Love, Love divination, protection, healing.

 

Also known as the tree of immortality because of its ability to 

re grow from a fallen branch in moist ground.

 

A wand made from Willow wood has many uses: 

sleep with it and have more vivid dreams, use it to draw down the moon, 

protection for underworld journeying

 

Magickal Brooms, witch’s brooms are traditionally bound with a willow’s branch.

 

 

There once was a Willow, and he was very old,

And all his leaves fell off from him, and left him in the cold;

But ere the rude winter could buffet him with snow,

There grew upon his hoary head a crop of mistletoe.

All wrinkled and furrowed was this old Willow’s skin,

His taper finger trembled, and his arms were very thin;

Two round eyes and hollow, that stared but did not see;

And sprawling feet that never walked, had this most ancient tree.

~Julianna Horatia Ewing, “The Willow Man” ”

Read more from the original post

Thanks to

http://www.thegoddesstree.com/trees/Willow.htm

What is Celtic?

For many people, the term “Celtic” is a homogenized one, popularly used to apply to cultural groups located in the British Isles and Ireland. However, from an anthropological standpoint, the term “Celtic” is actually fairly complex. Rather than meaning just people of Irish or English background, Celtic is used by scholars to define a specific set of language groups, originating both in the British Isles and in the mainland of Europe.

Celtic studies scholar Lisa Spangenberg says, “The Celts are an Indo-European people who spread from central Europe across the European continent to Western Europe, the British Isles, and southeast to Galatia (in Asia Minor) during the time before the Roman Empire. The Celtic family of languages is divided into two branches, the Insular Celtic languages, and the Continental Celtic languages.”

Today, the remains of early Celtic culture can be found in England and Scotland, Wales, Ireland, some areas of France and Germany, and even parts of the Iberian Peninsula.

To read the rest of this article by Patti Wigington please click on this link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/glossary/g/What-Is-Celtic.htm

Resources for Celtic Pagans

Many of our readers at About Paganism/Wicca are interested in the magic, folklore, and beliefs of the ancient Celts. Learn about the Celtic gods and goddesses, the tree months of the Celtic year, and books to read if you’re interested in Celtic Paganism.

Reading List for Celtic Pagans

If you’re interested in following a Celtic Pagan path, there are a number of books that are useful for your reading list. Although there are no written records of the ancient Celtic people, there are a number of reliable books by scholars that are worth reading. Some of the books on this list focus on history, others on legend and mythology. While this is by no means a comprehensive list of everything you need to understand Celtic Paganism, it’s a good starting point, and should help you learn at least the basics of honoring the gods of the Celtic peoples. More »

The Celtic Tree Months

The Celtic Tree Calendar is a calendar with thirteen lunar divisions. Most contemporary Pagans use fixed dates for each “month”, rather than following the waxing and waning lunar cycle. If this was done, eventually the calendar would fall out of sync with the Gregorian year, because some calendar years have 12 full moons and others have 13. The modern tree calendar is based on a concept that letters in the ancient Celtic Ogham alphabet corresponded to a tree. More »

To read the rest of this article by Patti Wigington please click on this link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/pagantraditions/tp/Resources-For-Celtic-Pagans.htm

Celtic/Neopagan handfasting

Overview:

There are two conflicting beliefs about the history of Handfasting:

bullet Handfasting” was the word used by the ancient Celts to describe their traditional trial-marriage ceremony, during which couples were literally bound together. The handfasting was  a temporary agreement, that expired after a year and a day. However, it could be made permanent after the year was up, if both spouses agreed.
bullet Handfasting” was the word used throughout the once-Celtic lands of Scotland and Northern England to refer to a commitment of betrothal or engagement. It was a ceremony in which the couple publicly declared their intention to marry one year and a day in the future. In 1820,  Sir Walter Scott used the term to refer to a fictional sacred ritual that bound the couple in a form of temporary marriage for a year and a day. He wrote of it in his book “The Monastery:

“When we are handfasted, as we term it, we are man and wife for a year and a day; that space gone by, each may choose another mate, or, at their pleasure, may call the priest to marry them for life; and this we call handfasting.” 1,2

Handfasting was suppressed following the Synod of Whitby in 664 [CE}…when Celtic Christianity was abandoned and Catholicism followed.

Even though the historical legitimacy of handfasting as a form of trial marriage is in doubt, some Wiccans and other Neopaganstoday create handfasting rituals for their own use or adopt ceremonies written by other Neopagans.

During the 1995 movie, Braveheart, Mel Gibson, in the role of William Wallace, was handfasted with his girlfriend Murron. Handfasting has since grown in popularity among Cowans (non-Pagans) — particularly those whose ancestors lived in ancient Celtic lands. 3

horizontal rule

What is the legal status of a handfasting ritual?…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: http://www.religioustolerance.org/mar_hand.htm