Egyptian Afterlife – The Field of Reeds

If  the soul passed through the Weighing of the Heart it moved on to a path which led to Lily Lake (also known as the Lake of Flowers). There are, again, a number of versions of what could happen on this path where, in some, one finds dangers to be avoided and gods to help and guide while, in others, it is an easy walk down the kind of path one would have known back home. At the shore of Lily Lake the soul would meet the Divine Ferryman, Hraf-hef (He-Who-Looks-Behind-Him) who was perpetually unpleasant. The soul would have to find some way to be courteous to Hraf-hef, no matter what unkind or cruel remarks he made, and show one’s self worthy of continuing the journey.

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Seasons of the Witch – Legends and Lore, Ancient Holidays

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Seasons of the Witch – Legends and Lore, Ancient Holidays

And Some Not So Ancient!

 

Today Is …

 

Day Dedicated to Nathor. (Nuit Nut, Nwt, Nathor) Celebrate with a Middle Eastern/Egyptian meal.

 

In ancient Egypt, the cow-headed Goddess Hathor was honored on this day by an annual festival known as Breaking the Nile. The festival, which was also dedicated to all water and River Goddesses, celebrated the rising of the fertile waters of the mystical River Nile.

 

In ancient Greece, the annual mourning ceremony called the Adonia was held on this date in honor of the dying hero-god Adonis.

 

Dog Days/Doyo – The Japanese call these the Dog Days, the most dangerous time of the year because of the heat which brings with it vermin and illness. The best way to stay healthy during this time is to eat lots of eels, whose slippery coolness is the proper antidote. For more information on the Dog Days, see July 2. Rufus, Anneli, The World Holiday Book, Harper San Francisco 1994

 

FEAST OF ‘AUT-YER, Egypt – Personification of Female Joy.

 

Gaia Consciousness Day – Day to meditate on Mother Earth as a living planet.

 

School of The Seasons, Sacred Source, The Daily Bleed

 

GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast Archives

Remember the ancient ways and keep them sacred!

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Live each Season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each. ~Henry David Thoreau (1817 – 1862)

 

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Courtesy of GrannyMoonsMorningFeast

 

Other Definitions of Pagan

From the Urban Dictionary:

A somewhat vague term derived from from the Latin word paganus. Pagan is a term which refers to a variety of different religions ranging from Wicca, to that of ancient Egypt and even Hinduism, among many others. Some Pagans are of no specific religion, but rather are eclectic. In general Pagan religions have more than one deity, or many gods which are aspects of one (an idea similar to that of the Christian trinity). Another quite common feature of Pagan religions are that they tend to be nature oriented. Pagan can also be used as a derogatory word for any non-Judeo/Christian/Islamic religion.
“The religion of the ancient Greeks is a Pagan religion”
by Megan Bennett May 25, 2004
From Merriam-Webster Dictionary:
noun pa·gan ˈpā-gən

1:  heathen 1; especially :  a follower of a polytheistic religion (as in ancient Rome)

2
:  one who has little or no religion and who delights in sensual pleasures and material goods :  an irreligious or hedonistic person
From Dictionary.Com:
noun
1.

(no longer in technical use) one of a people or community observing a polytheistic religion, as the ancient Romans and Greeks.
2.

a member of a religious, spiritual, or cultural community based on the worship of nature or the earth; a neopagan.
3.

Disparaging and Offensive.

  1. (in historical contexts) a person who is not a Christian, Jew, or Muslim; a heathen.
  2. an irreligious or hedonistic person.
  3. an uncivilized or unenlightened person.
adjective
4.

of, relating to, or characteristic of pagans.
5.

Disparaging and Offensive.

  1. relating to the worship or worshipers of any religion that is neither Christian, Jewish, nor Muslim.
  2. irreligious or hedonistic.
  3. (of a person) uncivilized or unenlightened.

Based On Random House Dictionary:

Heathen and pagan are primarily historical terms that were applied pejoratively, especially by people who were Christian, Jewish, or Muslim, to peoples who were not members of one of those three monotheistic religious groups. Heathen referred especially to the peoples and cultures of primitive or ancient tribes thought to harbor unenlightened, barbaric idol worshipers: heathen rites; heathen idols.
Pagan, although sometimes applied similarly to those tribes, was more often used to refer specifically to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who worshiped the multiple gods and goddesses said to dwell on Mount Olympus, such as Zeus and Athena (called Jupiter and Minerva by the Romans). The term was applied to their beliefs and culture as well: a pagan ritual; a pagan civilization.
Contemporary paganism, having evolved and expanded in Europe and North America since the 20th century, includes adherents of diverse groups that hold various beliefs, which may focus, for example, on the divinity of nature or of the planet Earth or which may be pantheistic or polytheistic. In modern English, heathen remains an offensive term, used to accuse someone of being unenlightened or irreligious; pagan, however, is increasingly a neutral description of certain existing and emerging religious movements.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.