Samhain Blessing

May what you sowed at Beltane have brought you a bountiful harvest!

Happy New year and blessed be dear ones.

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Let’s honor our ancestors.

The Festival of the Dead or Feast of Ancestors is held in many cultures around the world. For centuries people globally have been honoring their ancestors. The reverent devotion expressed by their deceased forbears through a culturally prescribed set of rules and observances.  From Japan, China, Korea to Nepal, Peru, Mexico, India, Scotland, Ireland and Cambodia are to name just a few.

The ancient Greeks, Romans, Persians, the Pacific and Tongan Islands, Africa and Native America till this day continue to recognize the honoring. These religious traditions have remained steadfast and are usually practiced among cultures who have strong ancestral reverence.

I take this time of the year to remember all the people in my life gone. I build a little remembrance alter, give them an offering, light a candle and allow myself to slip between the veil.

Happy all Hallows Eve.

A link with an insight on how people around the world celebrate their ancestors.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/festivals-dead-around-world-180953160/

Hypatia

Hypatia Of Alexandrea

For a Water Cremation Ask a Mortician – Article from the Washington Post

This article may seem out of place on this website but I thought it a good one to share as we approach Sanhaim. If it is offensive to any reader I appologize. I feel it is important to consider and know other cultures biews on how to honor those who cross the veil into the Summerlands.

Article written by Tara Bahrampour in the October 20, 2017 issue of the Washington Post

In some Indonesian villages, families live with and care for the bodies of their loved ones for months or years after they die. In Japan, relatives of the deceased use chopsticks to remove large bone fragments from cremated ashes. In Mexico, mummified babies and children were once revered, and people would hold parties and games for them.

If those practices sound alarming, Caitlin Doughty would like to remind you that injecting a body with formaldehyde might seem appalling to people in some parts of the world. Recently, she crisscrossed the globe looking at how diverse, and even healing, death can be. Her new book, “From Here To Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death,” published this month, underlines how subjective our views on death are.

Doughty, 33, is a mortician in Los Angeles but, as she says, “that doesn’t really describe it.” She is an activist for a view of death that offers a lot more choices than Americans have traditionally been given. Doughty believes that what happens after a person dies can be much more personal, transcendent, and comforting than the mainstream funeral industry would have us believe.

By exploring death rituals around the world, her goal was to open the door to new possibilities.

“Even things that we find strange or repulsive or disrespectful can actually be quite beautiful when you break them down and tell the stories,” she said. “I was hoping to prove that change is possible and that even when I’m standing there with a son brushing off his father’s mummified corpse or I’m seeing a body being pulled off a compost pile, there’s so much respect there and it’s such a human process. You could be surrounded by mummies and still feel completely comfortable … because there are children running around and playing and laughing and it just feels like a family has gotten together to be happy and perform this ritual.”

Doughty, who has written a memoir about her profession and also hosts “Ask A Mortician,” a series of video shorts that discuss such phenomena as coffin births (when built-up gases cause a recently deceased pregnant woman’s body to expel a fetus) and what happened to the bodies of those who died on the Titanic. Some of the videos boast hundreds of thousands of views, perhaps testimony to a transformation Doughty says is underway as more Americans consider alternatives to the standard funeral package.

“People are going to funeral homes and going to ‘traditional’ services and they’re more and more not satisfied with them,” she said. “They see Mom and she looks kind of waxen, and they’re like, ‘This isn’t for me. There must be another way.’ ”

This attitude reflects a generational change, she said. “The people who are really dying right now are in their 80s and 90s, the Greatest Generation. I think they’re going to be the last generation to embrace the embalming the body, putting it on display, the wake, the Catholic ritual. Baby boomers, Generation X and Millennials are more open to these new ideas, to these green ideas, to these participatory ideas.”

The new ideas include allowing loved ones to attend a cremation, or doing a water cremation, in which the body is dissolved in very hot water and lye (avoiding the use of natural gas and the release of toxins).

Doughty got interested in death as a child after witnessing another child suffer a fall that was likely fatal. The experience made her afraid of death; she confronted her fear by entering a field in which death is commonplace.

But once there, she felt something was missing.

“It was always my instinct that we weren’t doing enough for our families, that we weren’t giving them enough emotional space to really grieve and have feelings,” she said. “Nothing makes me more angry when I hear about someone asking a funeral director, ‘Do you think that I could come in and fix Mom’s hair and fix Mom’s lipstick, because she liked to wear it this way,’ and they say no. It’s like their self-esteem is so wrapped up in them being the professionals.”

By contrast, many other cultures encourage intimate physical contact with the deceased, resulting in a warmer, less forbidding experience. “When you’re in Mexico the whole cemetery is just glowing as they interact with the memories of the dead,” she said.

For the book she also traveled within the United States to visit people who are promoting alternative methods, such as a North Carolina group that experiments with composting human remains and a mobile funeral pyre operation in Colorado.

To Doughty there’s no right or wrong way to do things, including the standard American way, but she would like people to have access to a wider range of choices — such as burying a loved one’s remains on private property, or setting them on a mountaintop for the vultures.

“These things aren’t available and you should be angry about that, because the American funeral system has a lobby,” she said. “There are regulations in place that make it incredibly hard to enter the funeral industry or have any new type of disposition become available.”

Recently, the cremation rate surpassed the burial rate in the United States for the first time. Still, embalming, which is particularly lucrative for funeral homes, is more common here than in any other country, and it is often done even when a body is going to be cremated, Doughty said. Twenty-nine states require funeral homes to be ready to embalm, meaning that even if a mortician serves only clients who don’t embalm, such as Muslims, “the state is going to say, ‘You need to go to mortician school and set up a $100,000 embalming room.’ ”

For herself, Doughty wants to be buried close to the surface of the earth, “in that really rich topsoil full of microbes and fungi. I want my body to decompose. As women we’re taught to be contained and clean and not have control over our bodies. … There’s something about the messiness of the process — the oozing and stretching out into the dirt and the earth, and that my organic matter is merging with other organic matter, that is what’s really attractive to me and really brings me comfort.”

Samhain Coven Gathering Monday, October 30, 2017 at 7:00 PM CT

“Festival of the Dead”
Samhain Ritual – Written and lead by our adept Armer.

WHEN:

MONDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2017

GATHERING STARTS AT 7:00 PM CT
CIRCLE STARTS AT 7:15 PM CT
PLEASE DO NOT ENTER THE CHAT ROOM AFTER 7:15 PM CT as that will break the circle

WHERE:

COVEN LIFE’S CHAT ROOM

What you will need:

One Black candle: Representing death and darkness
One Orange candle: As encouragement for the spirits of the deceased to make a connection with those in the mundane world.
 One Pumpkin: The glow symbolizes the spiritual survival of death to welcome the spirits of the deceased. (Maybe carved and Lit)
 One Mask: (Of your choosing) To be worn or placed in the room. Masks serve as reminders that we are always surrounded by the realms of the spirits and the Goddess/Gods themselves, and on this night more than any other, they are very close.
A snack for feasting and wine for making merry.
Optional: Feel free to decorate your altar with pumpkins, cornstalks, gourds, acorns, and apples. You may include photos or memorabilia of deceased family, friends, and companion creatures.

RITUAL

ARMER: Merry greet Brothers and Sisters of the Craft and honored guests.
EVERYONE: Respond with Merry Greet. Please tell us your first name and your location.
Guardians of the Watchtowers to the East we invoke you to protect this circle and empower our work within this circle.
Guardians of the Watchtowers to the South we invoke you to protect this circle and empower our work within this circle.
Guardians of the Watchtowers to the West we invoke you to protect this circle and empower our work within this circle.
Guardians of the Watchtowers to the North we invoke you to protect this circle and empower our work within this circle.
ARMER: I cast this circle round all those here Three times Three to protect all inside and outside. To gather our strength and power as One. To Commune with those who have parted to the Summerland’s.
EVERYONE RESPOND: In perfect Love and perfect Trust I enter this circle.
ARMER: This circle is now Closed!
We stand at the Crossroads at a time when the Veil between Life and Death is very thin. Our intention is to reach out and Commune with our departed loved ones. To honor those we love by remembering them solemnly.
EVERYONE RESPOND: This is our will, So mote it be!
ARMER: Here and now we invoke Divine Spirit, the power, and force to protect this circle from any Wicked Spirits that may do us harm. Protect all inside and outside from any spirit that has ill intent towards anyone present, we call thee hence.
Light your ORANGE candle and then your BLACK candle at this time. Also, light your pumpkin if it has a lite.
ARMER:  We invoke thee “HEKATE”, the triple Goddess of the Moon, Earth, and Underworld.
Have your Dragons bring you forth. Pierce the dark veil on this night, grant us visits, give us sight to speak with loved ones, this Hollow night. Visions we seek to touch our hearts, questions, and answers before we part.
EVERYONE RESPOND: Part the veil that we may see.
At this time everyone may feast and drink as a friendly gesture. Saving a bit of each as an offering.
EVERYONE: Each of us will meditate (Commune) with our deceased loved ones. Remembering our past. Be open to receive messages and ask questions. Understanding may come at a later time. Enjoy the visit for 3 minutes. (You may go back to visit with your loved one (s) after the circle has been opened or tomorrow if you choose to.)
EVERYONE: At the end of the 3 Minutes everyone say to those you have visited and type in Merry meet and merry part, until we merry meet again.
LADY BELTANE: Blessed are we that have felt the touch of our loved ones once again. We thank you all for coming forth to visit with us. Please return to your place of rest and peace with our deepest love and gratitude until we meet again.
ARMER: HEKATE, Goddess of the Witches, we Honor you. Queen of the dead, we thank thee. We are grateful for your power and energy that helped lift the veil of the Underworld tonight. Hail and Farewell Hekate of the crossroads.
EVERYONE RESPOND: Hail and Farewell Hekate
ARMER: Divine Spirit, We thank thee for your power and strength that prevented wicked spirits from entering our circle. We bid thee farewell.
Guardians of the Watchtower in the North return from where you came with our thank you for your power and energy that helped me with our work tonight.
Guardians of the Watchtower in the West return from where you came with our thank you for your power and energy that helped me with our work tonight.
Guardians of the Watchtower in the South return from where you came with our thank you for your power and energy that helped me with our work tonight.
Guardians of the Watchtower in the East return from where you came with our thank you for your power and energy that helped me with our work tonight.
ARMER: The circle is now open but never broken. Thank you to my Brothers and Sisters of the Craft for being here tonight and lending your Power and Strength to the circle. I pray your visit to the Summerland’s was fruitful and enlightening. Merry part until we merry meet again. Have a blessed and Happy Samhain!

All About Samhain – Celebrating the Witches’ New Year in the Southern Hemisphere Part 4

CRAFTS AND CREATIONS

As Samhain approaches, decorate your home (and keep your kids entertained) with a number of easy craft projects. Start celebrating a bit early with these fun and simple ideas that honor the final harvest, and the cycle of life and death.

FEASTING AND FOOD

No Pagan celebration is really complete without a meal to go along with it.

At Samhain, celebrate with foods that celebrate the final harvest, and the death of the fields.

By Patti Wigington

All About Samhain – Celebrating the Witches’ New Year in the Southern Hemisphere Part 5

TRADITIONS AND TRENDS

Interested in learning about some of the traditions behind the celebrations of the late harvest? Find out why Samhain is important, learn why black cats are considered unlucky, how trick-or-treating became so popular and more!

By Patti Wigington

All About Samhain – Celebrating the Witches’ New Year in the Southern Hemisphere Part 2

SAMHAIN MAGIC, DIVINATION AND SPIRIT WORK

For many Pagans, Samhain is a time to do magic that focuses on the spirit world. Learn how to properly conduct a seance, how to do some Samhain divination workings, and the way to figure out what a spirit guide is really up to!

By Patti Wigington

All About Samhain – Celebrating the Witches’ New Year in the Southern Hemisphere Part 1

The fields are bare, the leaves have fallen from the trees, and the skies are going gray and cold. It is the time of year when the earth has died and gone dormant. Every year on October 31 (or May 1, if you’re in the Southern Hemisphere) the Sabbat we call Samhain presents us with the opportunity to once more celebrate the cycle of death and rebirth. For many Pagan traditions, Samhain is a time to reconnect with our ancestors, and honor those who have died.

This is the time when the veil between our world and the spirit realm is thin, so it’s the perfect time of year to make contact with the dead.

RITUALS AND CEREMONIES

Depending on your individual spiritual path, there are many different ways you can celebrate Samhain, but typically the focus is on either honoring our ancestors, or the cycle of death and rebirth. This is the time of year when the gardens and fields are brown and dead. The nights are getting longer, there’s a chill in the air, and winter is looming. We may choose to honor our ancestors, celebrating those who have died, and even try to communicate with them. Here are a few rituals you may want to think about trying for Samhain — and remember, any of them can be adapted for either a solitary practitioner or a small group, with just a little planning ahead.

By Patti Wigington