A Joyous and Blessed Samhain

May your dance be one of joy with your ancestors and friends who have crossed the veil. Please kind in mind when honoring ancestors they do not necessarily have to be related by blood or family ties, an ancestor can be anyone who at some point in your life made a difference in it.

An example of a none blood/family ancestor – About a year and a half after my father crossed into the Summerlands I started taking oil painting lessons I was about 13 years old. My teacher was in her Crone years but her love and patience she embraced me with, plus her time spent teaching me, along with others in my class, instilled in me the real beauty of creating something going from my imagination out on to a canvas that I could see. Her warmth and love of art made a big difference in my life when I needed to become a child again instead of an adult taking care of my mother because her grief was almost completely oppressing her.

Advertisements

Magic During Samhain: What Types Of Magic Are Best To Do?

 

Samhain is the time of year when the veils are thinnest, and consequently the spirit world and our world are closer together and communication is more readily and frequently available to us. It’s also a time of year when some of us who are already psychically sensitive to spirits and daimons find that our senses are heightened.

So how we do best take advantage of this time of year? What types of magic are best to practice during this period?

First type that readily comes to mind: divination. Divination is one of those talents which lies both in the psychic and magical realms, and while there are certain forms of divination which fall under one versus the other, either way this is a great thing to practice right now. This especially goes for those who regularly work with a particular daimon or deity when they perform divinations. Deities and daimons associated with divinations, oracles, dreams, omens, and prophecy include ApolloZeusHekateHermesPanBrigidthe MorriganHorusThoth, and Gabriel.

To continue reading…..

Salem & The Magick of Halloween Costumes

There is perhaps no other holiday so closely tied to wearing costumes as Samhain or Halloween. In Mickie Mueller’s Little Book of Halloween, she traces the tradition of costume wearing and trick-or-treating and how they were introduced by Pagans and kept alive despite the Christian Church’s transformation of Samhain into All Souls’ Day in an attempt to divert the people’s attention from pagan practices of honoring the deceased ancestors. She writes that:

To continue reading…..

 

Samhain/Beltane Sabbat Gathering – Read Article for all the Information You Need

The rituals this evening were written by Lady Beltane and Priestess Hypatia. Lady Beltane will be leading the one for the Northern Hemisphere and Priestess Hypatia will be leading the one for the Southern Hemisphere. We ask that no matter which hemisphere you live in on Mother Earth that you attend for the entire ritual from the time the circle is cast until it is closed.

WHEN:

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2018

SOCIAL HOUR IS FROM 6:00 TO 7:00 PM CT (We are still on Daylight Savings time in the USA)

Use To Covert to Your Local Time

The Sacred Circle will be cast at 7:00 PM CT (Again please use the link to convert to your local time.)

Please remember not to enter the chat room after the circle has been cast because that will break the protection the circle,

WHERE:

Coven Life’s Chatroom

 NORTHERN HEMISPHERE: WHAT YOU WILL NEED:

  Our ritual this evening is for honoring 1 ancestor because of how long the coven’s ritual is incorporating both halves of Mother Earth. You can do this ritual alone any time of day on Samhain using 1 birthday cake size candle for each ancestor you would like to visit with or just invite into your home for a specific amount of time. Usually, the amount of time is however long the candle is burning for ancestors you want to feel or see or hear from again. For ancestors, you wish to stay around longer use a larger candle. The spell we chant during the ritual asks for a specific name if you are going to be inviting in a few or a lot of ancestors you only name to put their names in the spell the last time you chant it as you say the person’s name light a candle for them. I use a pie pan with about 3/4-inch of sand or dirt (that I have put into a ziplock type bad and crushed with either my rolling pin or a meat tenderizing mallet until it is fine like sand is. Either will hold the candle(s) upright and help even out the heat when the candles have burned down even with the sand or dirt. Make sure to put whatever you use to hold more than one or two birthday cake candles on some type of trivet or hot pan holder so the item holding the candles does not directly touch the surface wherever you have them burning.

1 Birthday Cake Candle (The straight about 2-inch long kind, color does not matter)

                                                Heatproof container with sand or dirt in it that you can hold (You will be putting the birthday cake candle in this)

                                                2 Black 4 inch candles or 2 4 white candles turn upside down or colored black with a magic marker

2 Candle Holders for 4 inch candles

Lighter or Matches

A Place to do the ritual where you can SAFELY set the 4-inch candles on the floor at least 4 feet apart or more so you can safely walk through them.

Something to sit on either on the floor or a chair if getting up off the floor is difficult for you

A medium to a large container of water or a fire extinguisher close enough to grab if a candle falls over (We always want everyone to keep safety in mind when using things that are burning – candle, incenses, paper, etc.)

 

SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE: You will need:

 

This is a wonderful time to help bring your dreams, aspirations and hopes to manifestation. This will be done by putting together a charm box that will be planted in the garden or wherever you feel drawn to.

·         A small – medium shallow box- you choose the size. Remember the bigger the box the more you will be filling it. Try and keep it reasonable by using the Goldilocks hypotheses- not too big, and not too small, just right. Some even use shoe boxes. If you don’t have a garden you may want to make a mini wish pot to keep in your garden. The idea is the same.

·         Seeds- some suggestions could be sunflower, poppy etc……

·         Rose petals

·         Fresh earth- soil in a container.

·         NOTE: please place some rose petals and seeds aside to sprinkle on top of box before you plant it.

·         Paper

·         Coloured markers or pens, crayons etc….. Anything that you could draw and write with.

·         Your symbol that represents your wish. Please see Suggested symbols for your wish box below.

·         Draw on the box whatever you feel will assist in manifesting your wish, it can include the Triple Moon Goddess, a heart, a pentacle, spirals representing the Goddess and Horns representing the God or whatever you feel drawn to. This is your WISH.

Suggested Symbols For Your Wish Box:

Love & Marriage – gingerbread
New Job – copper coin
Abundance – silver coin
Difficult Task – glove
Hearth & Home – thimble
Seeking the Truth – sprig of rosemary
Health, Healing, Renewed Strength – blue & green ribbon entwined

Happiness, Good Luck – cinnamon stickSeeking Knowledge – apple
To Find A Lost Item – feather
Protection – key (an old iron key is best if you have one)

Planting the wish Box:

·         Give the earth a water the night before or wait for a couple of days if rain is due.

·         Dig a hole 2 inches deep and place your Beltane Wish Box

·         Carefully concentrate in your wish and visualize it coming to fruition.

·         Imagine your wish growing with flowers and reaching the sky as you covert with earth.

·         As you plant the box please say: “Dream that lies within the earth awaken now. Hope that sleeps awaken now. The stars await as so do I. Grow true, grow strong, toward the sky.”

CIRCLE CASTING

LADY BELTANE: I cast this circle around Mother Earth from north to south and east to west from above us to below us to keep us safe from anyone or thing they may try to harm us while we are doing our rituals

EVERYONE: Type in So mote it be. Also, your first name and what country or state you live in (no names of cities please)

Samhain ritual to honor an ancestor (We will be allowing 5 to 6 minutes for this part of our circle this evening. Try to set up your candles and where you will be sitting ahead of us starting the ritual so you will have more time to visit with your blood ancestor)

EVERYONE: Set your two 4-inch candles safely on the floor wide enough apart so you can walk through them without knocking them over. (I suggest at least 4 feet apart or more). You will be walking north to south so place whatever you will be sitting on to the south of the 4-inch candles at least 3 feet away from them or further so they are not accidentally knocked over when you get up the seated position.

Light to 4-inch candles. Deep 3 very deep cleansing breath and letting each out slowly calming your mind and spirit  Now walk through the space between the 4-inch candles imagine you are crossing through the veil between our physical plane and the spiritual plane. Bring the birthday cake candle in its holder with you. Sit down comfortably and then light the birthday candle while chanting this spell three times:

Blood to blood (NAME OF PERSON YOU WANT TO VISIT WITH) I call to thee

Blood to blood  (NAME OF PERSON YOU WANT TO VISIT WITH) I honor thee

Blood to blood  (NAME OF PERSON YOU WANT TO VISIT WITH) come to me

After you are through chanting the spell sit talking with or feeling your ancestor until your candle has burned out visiting with your ancestor.

When your birthday candle has burned down to the level of sand or dirt blow it out and type in: the First name of the person you were visiting with and Thank you for honoring me by coming please return to where you were. So mote it be.

Now stand up and walk back through the 4-inch candles from the spirit plane to our physical plane. Blow the candle out then say: I close this passage between the physical and spiritual planes.

IT IS NOW TIME THAT WE ALL CELEBRATE BELTANE WITH OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS IN THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE.

Beginning the Beltane ritual with an observance:

PRIESTESS HYPATIA: Beltane is here and we welcome this time of fertility, joy, happiness, growth and manifestation. This is a time of Union of the Great God and Goddess. We greet this season of fire with passion and love with loving hearts and open arms. Let us come together to create life and honour this blessed union between the feminine and the masculine form which all life flows from.

As the Earth grows and creates life, so to we shall grow and create life.

EVERYONE: So mote it be!

Now the Instructions for the Wish Box:

·         Take the piece of paper and with the pen write down your wish. Type done when you are finished.

·         If you feel drawn to do so, decorate the box with your chosen symbols. Type done when you are finished.

·         Poke holes in the box lid to help the wish seeds to grow. Type done when you have finished.

·         Sprinkle some earth into the bottom of your box to make a shallow bed of earth. This is to scatter your seeds on. Type done when you have finished.

·         Place in the box your paper wish that you have written and your symbol for your wish.

·         Sprinkle this with more earth. Type done when you have finished.

·         Then sprinkle the seeds and the rose petals on top of the earth inside the box.

·         Cover the final layer with earth. Type done when you have finished.

·         Place the lid on the box, have it ready to plant the box when you feel it is the right time over the next couple of days. Type done when you have finished.

·         Keep the rose petal and seed mix to scatter on the box before burying it.

EVERYONE Finish of by saying:

On this scared blessed day, we thank you, Great Mother and Father, for all that you have given and will continue to give. You who make all of life anew and joyous with your sacred union. May you continue to bring magic and laughter into our lives.

Ancient ones I celebrate with you….

So mote it be!

LADY BELTANE: I close this circle from below to above us. I close this circle from west to east. I close this circle from south to north. May you go in peace, harmony, and love until we meet again the circle is closed but never broken. Blessed be dear brothers and sisters.

RITUAL TO IS OVER NOW TO CELEBRATE SAMHAIN AND BELTANE RISE YOUR GLASS HIGH AND SALUTE OUR GODS AND GODDESSES. Please stay to visit, ask questions, or just hang out for as long as you would like to.

Five Ways to Honor Your Ancestors

We all have ancestors, both of blood and of spirit, and each of our lives rests firmly on the foundation of their sacrifice. They are as near to us as our breath and bones, and when related with in conscious ways, they can be a tremendous source of healing, guidance, and companionship. The ancestors we choose to honor may include not only recent and more distant family but also beloved friends and community, cultural and religious leaders, and even other-than-human kin such as companion animals. Our ancestors bring vital support to fulfill our potential here on Earth, and, through involvement in our lives, also further their own growth and maturation in the spirit realms.

Like the living, spirits of the deceased run the full spectrum from wise and loving to self-absorbed and harmful. Physical death is a major event for the soul, a rite of passage we will all face, and the living can provide critical momentum for the recently deceased to make the initiatory leap to become a helpful ancestor. Once the dead have become ancestors, part of their post-death journey may include making repairs for wrongs committed while here on Earth. For their sake and for ours, it’s good to spend a little time now and again feeding our relationships with the ancestors. The five suggestions below, none of which require belief in any specific tradition or dogma, are safe and effective ways to assist our beloved dead and to welcome the ongoing support and blessings of the ancestors in our everyday lives.

Fulfill Your Soul’s Purpose as an Ethical and Loving Person…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: 5 Ways to Honor Your Ancestors

As the Northern Hemisphere Begins to Settle in For The Cold Tempatures and Shorter Days

Now is the time to finish your final harvest as anything left on plants, trees, and vines on Samhain, October 31st is for the wildlife, gods, and goddesses to enjoy.

It is time, if you can, to can fruits and vegetables. To pick, during the right Moon phase for optimal power, and dry your herbs. To stick up on other non-perishables you have to buy, put extra meat and homemade or store bread in your freezer. I even buy a small thing of powdered milk in case we get snowed in.

I also check to make sure I have all my magickal supplies, candles, herbs, oils, etc, stocked and ready for use. I also make sure I have my Yule log under a trap so I don’t have a problem lighting on the Winter Solstice. Whenever possible I do a ritual outdoors for Samhain and the Winter Solstice because I do not have any type of fireplace indoors.

As for my home now is when I do a fall cleaning and through smudging in every room and my basement. I want to make sure I do not have any negativity in my home before the windows are closed and the furnace turned on giving it and/or nasty beings a place to hide in.

Please tell us what you do to get ready for you he darker and colder time of the year. Leave as long a comment as you want to. I hope I can get some new ideas from others on preparing for this time of year.

Let’s honor our ancestors.

The Festival of the Dead or Feast of Ancestors is held in many cultures around the world. For centuries people globally have been honoring their ancestors. The reverent devotion expressed by their deceased forbears through a culturally prescribed set of rules and observances.  From Japan, China, Korea to Nepal, Peru, Mexico, India, Scotland, Ireland and Cambodia are to name just a few.

The ancient Greeks, Romans, Persians, the Pacific and Tongan Islands, Africa and Native America till this day continue to recognize the honoring. These religious traditions have remained steadfast and are usually practiced among cultures who have strong ancestral reverence.

I take this time of the year to remember all the people in my life gone. I build a little remembrance alter, give them an offering, light a candle and allow myself to slip between the veil.

Happy all Hallows Eve.

A link with an insight on how people around the world celebrate their ancestors.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/festivals-dead-around-world-180953160/

Hypatia

Hypatia Of Alexandrea

For a Water Cremation Ask a Mortician – Article from the Washington Post

This article may seem out of place on this website but I thought it a good one to share as we approach Sanhaim. If it is offensive to any reader I appologize. I feel it is important to consider and know other cultures biews on how to honor those who cross the veil into the Summerlands.

Article written by Tara Bahrampour in the October 20, 2017 issue of the Washington Post

In some Indonesian villages, families live with and care for the bodies of their loved ones for months or years after they die. In Japan, relatives of the deceased use chopsticks to remove large bone fragments from cremated ashes. In Mexico, mummified babies and children were once revered, and people would hold parties and games for them.

If those practices sound alarming, Caitlin Doughty would like to remind you that injecting a body with formaldehyde might seem appalling to people in some parts of the world. Recently, she crisscrossed the globe looking at how diverse, and even healing, death can be. Her new book, “From Here To Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death,” published this month, underlines how subjective our views on death are.

Doughty, 33, is a mortician in Los Angeles but, as she says, “that doesn’t really describe it.” She is an activist for a view of death that offers a lot more choices than Americans have traditionally been given. Doughty believes that what happens after a person dies can be much more personal, transcendent, and comforting than the mainstream funeral industry would have us believe.

By exploring death rituals around the world, her goal was to open the door to new possibilities.

“Even things that we find strange or repulsive or disrespectful can actually be quite beautiful when you break them down and tell the stories,” she said. “I was hoping to prove that change is possible and that even when I’m standing there with a son brushing off his father’s mummified corpse or I’m seeing a body being pulled off a compost pile, there’s so much respect there and it’s such a human process. You could be surrounded by mummies and still feel completely comfortable … because there are children running around and playing and laughing and it just feels like a family has gotten together to be happy and perform this ritual.”

Doughty, who has written a memoir about her profession and also hosts “Ask A Mortician,” a series of video shorts that discuss such phenomena as coffin births (when built-up gases cause a recently deceased pregnant woman’s body to expel a fetus) and what happened to the bodies of those who died on the Titanic. Some of the videos boast hundreds of thousands of views, perhaps testimony to a transformation Doughty says is underway as more Americans consider alternatives to the standard funeral package.

“People are going to funeral homes and going to ‘traditional’ services and they’re more and more not satisfied with them,” she said. “They see Mom and she looks kind of waxen, and they’re like, ‘This isn’t for me. There must be another way.’ ”

This attitude reflects a generational change, she said. “The people who are really dying right now are in their 80s and 90s, the Greatest Generation. I think they’re going to be the last generation to embrace the embalming the body, putting it on display, the wake, the Catholic ritual. Baby boomers, Generation X and Millennials are more open to these new ideas, to these green ideas, to these participatory ideas.”

The new ideas include allowing loved ones to attend a cremation, or doing a water cremation, in which the body is dissolved in very hot water and lye (avoiding the use of natural gas and the release of toxins).

Doughty got interested in death as a child after witnessing another child suffer a fall that was likely fatal. The experience made her afraid of death; she confronted her fear by entering a field in which death is commonplace.

But once there, she felt something was missing.

“It was always my instinct that we weren’t doing enough for our families, that we weren’t giving them enough emotional space to really grieve and have feelings,” she said. “Nothing makes me more angry when I hear about someone asking a funeral director, ‘Do you think that I could come in and fix Mom’s hair and fix Mom’s lipstick, because she liked to wear it this way,’ and they say no. It’s like their self-esteem is so wrapped up in them being the professionals.”

By contrast, many other cultures encourage intimate physical contact with the deceased, resulting in a warmer, less forbidding experience. “When you’re in Mexico the whole cemetery is just glowing as they interact with the memories of the dead,” she said.

For the book she also traveled within the United States to visit people who are promoting alternative methods, such as a North Carolina group that experiments with composting human remains and a mobile funeral pyre operation in Colorado.

To Doughty there’s no right or wrong way to do things, including the standard American way, but she would like people to have access to a wider range of choices — such as burying a loved one’s remains on private property, or setting them on a mountaintop for the vultures.

“These things aren’t available and you should be angry about that, because the American funeral system has a lobby,” she said. “There are regulations in place that make it incredibly hard to enter the funeral industry or have any new type of disposition become available.”

Recently, the cremation rate surpassed the burial rate in the United States for the first time. Still, embalming, which is particularly lucrative for funeral homes, is more common here than in any other country, and it is often done even when a body is going to be cremated, Doughty said. Twenty-nine states require funeral homes to be ready to embalm, meaning that even if a mortician serves only clients who don’t embalm, such as Muslims, “the state is going to say, ‘You need to go to mortician school and set up a $100,000 embalming room.’ ”

For herself, Doughty wants to be buried close to the surface of the earth, “in that really rich topsoil full of microbes and fungi. I want my body to decompose. As women we’re taught to be contained and clean and not have control over our bodies. … There’s something about the messiness of the process — the oozing and stretching out into the dirt and the earth, and that my organic matter is merging with other organic matter, that is what’s really attractive to me and really brings me comfort.”