Celebrating Lammas

The year is 1100. The date is August 1. The monks in the abbey at Gloucester are celebrating the holy-day of St. Peter in Chains. One of the monks wakes from a strange dream in which God promises to strike down the wicked King who has abused the Holy Church. His superior, Abbot Serlo, on hearing of the dreams sends a warning to the King, William the Red, who has oppressed all of England with taxes and disgusted many with his licentiousness and blasphemy. Red, as he is called, receives the message the following day while preparing to indulge in one of his favorite sports, hunting, in the New Forest. Although there are no longer any people dwelling in the New Forest — they were all cleared out by Red’s father, William the Conqueror — there are rumors that it’s a hotbed of pagan activity. And August 2 is an important pagan holy-day. The Saxons call it Lammas, the Loaf-Mass. William the Red laughs at the warning from the monks and goes out hunting. A short time later, he is dead, struck in the chest by a stray arrow, and his brother, Henry, who was in the hunting party is riding hot-foot for Winchester and the crown.

Now some people say that William the Red was a Lammas sacrifice, …

Please continue reading by clicking this link: Celebrating Lammas

Lammas History: Welcoming the Harvest

The Beginning of the Harvest:

At Lammas, also called Lughnasadh, the hot days of August are upon us, much of the earth is dry and parched, but we still know that the bright reds and yellows of the harvest season are just around the corner. Apples are beginning to ripen in the trees, our summer vegetables have been picked, corn is tall and green, waiting for us to come gather the bounty of the crop fields. Now is the time to begin reaping what we have sown, and gathering up the first harvests of grain, wheat, oats, and more.

This holiday can be celebrated either as a way to honor the god Lugh, or as a celebration of the harvest.

Celebrating Grain in Ancient Cultures:

Grain has held a place of importance in civilization back nearly to the beginning of time. Grain became associated with the cycle of death and rebirth. The Sumerian god Tammuz was slain and his lover Ishtar grieved so heartily that nature stopped producing. Ishtar mourned Tammuz, and followed him to the Underworld to bring him back, similar to the story of Demeter and Persephone.

In Greek legend, the grain god was Adonis. Two goddesses, Aphrodite and Persephone, battled for his love. To end the fighting, Zeus ordered Adonis to spend six months with Persephone in the Underworld, and the rest with Aphrodite.

A Feast of Bread:

In early Ireland, it was a bad idea to harvest your grain any time before Lammas — it meant that the previous year’s harvest had run out early, and that was a serious failing in agricultural communities. However, on August 1, the first sheaves of grain were cut by the farmer, and by nightfall his wife had made the first loaves of bread of the season.

The word Lammas derives from the Old English phrase hlaf-maesse, which translates to loaf mass. In early Christian times, the first loaves of the season were blessed by the Church.

Honoring Lugh, the Skillful God:

In some Wiccan and modern Pagan traditions, Lammas is also a day of honoring Lugh, the Celtic craftsman god. He is a god of many skills, and was honored in various aspects by societies both in the British Isles and in Europe. Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-NAS-ah) is still celebrated in many parts of the world today. Lugh’s influence appears in the names of several European towns.

Honoring the Past:

In our modern world, it’s often easy to forget the trials and tribulations our ancestors had to endure. For us, if we need a loaf of bread, we simply drive over to the local grocery store and buy a few bags of prepackaged bread. If we run out, it’s no big deal, we just go and get more. When our ancestors lived, hundreds and thousands of years ago, the harvesting and processing of grain was crucial. If crops were left in the fields too long, or the bread not baked in time, families could starve. Taking care of one’s crops meant the difference between life and death.

By celebrating Lammas as a harvest holiday, we honor our ancestors and the hard work they must have had to do in order to survive. This is a good time to give thanks for the abundance we have in our lives, and to be grateful for the food on our tables. Lammas is a time of transformation, of rebirth and new beginnings.

Symbols of the Season

The Wheel of the Year has turned once more, and you may feel like decorating your house accordingly. While you probably can’t find too many items marked as “Lammas decor” in your local discount store, there are a number of items you can use as decoration for this harvest holiday.

  • Sickles and scythes, as well as other symbols of harvesting
  • Grapes and vines
  • Dried grains — sheafs of wheat, bowls of oats, etc.
  • Corn dolls — you can make these easily using dried husks
  • Early fall vegetables, such as squashes and pumpkins
  • Late summer fruits, like apples, plums and peaches

Crafts, Song and Celebration

Because of its association with Lugh, the skilled god, Lammas (Lughnasadh) is also a time to celebrate talents and craftsmanship. It’s a traditional time of year for craft festivals, and for skilled artisans to peddle their wares. In medieval Europe, guilds would arrange for their members to set up booths around a village green, festooned with bright ribbons and fall colors. Perhaps this is why so many modern Renaissance Festivals begin around this time of year!

Lugh is also known in some traditions as the patron of bards and magicians. Now is a great time of year to work on honing your own talents. Learn a new craft, or get better at an old one. Put on a play, write a story or poem, take up a musical instrument, or sing a song. Whatever you choose to do, this is the right season for rebirth and renewal, so set August 1 as the day to share your new skill with your friends and family.

From: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/LammasFolklore/a/Legends-And-Folklore-Of-Bread.htm

Lammas/Lughnasadh Rites & Rituals

Set Up Your Lammas Altar

August 1 is known as Lammas, or Lughnasadh (it’s February 1, if you’re in the Southern Hemisphere). This is a day to celebrate the beginnings of the harvest, when the grain and corn is gathered. It’s also a time, in some traditions, of honoring Lugh, the Celtic craftsman god. Here are some ideas for dressing up your altar for your Lammas (Lughnasadh) celebration! Setting Up Your Lammas Altar More »

Lammas Ritual

Lughnasadh Altar outside 2016

I had two different Lammas rituals that I could have gone to and both got cancelled!  So what to do?  I didn’t have time to write something so luckily I found a nice opening that a friend had posted and I used that.  I have no idea where he found it from so if you know let me know and I will give proper credit.

I set up what I call my Easy Altar outside.  I have a glass container with glass votives in elemental colors with candles and they are sitting in earth.  I had a couple of pieces of corn husks with corn kernels in them.

I spoke the following and then added my own words that came from my heart. Then I buried the corn husks as an offering in my garden.

“Oh Spirit of the East, Land of the rising Sun, Of Air, the winds that blow across the lands, of new beginnings each day and of open horizons. We bless you and ask for your wisdom and blessing here with us today. Please join us, Spirit of the East.

Oh Spirit of the South, Place of Passion, Fire and Creation and Inspiration, whose warm breath reminds us of summer days. Ignite our hearts with love. We bless you and ask for your wisdom and blessing here with us today. Please join us, Spirit of the South.

Oh Spirit of the West, the land of the setting Sun, of water and Autumn’s whisper. Bless us with the knowledge of peace which follows the harvest of a fruitful life. We bless you and ask for your wisdom and blessing here today. Please join us, Spirit of the West.

Oh Spirit of the North, place of quiet, stillness, of cave and deep earth. Place of thankfulness for the knowledge and blessings that have come to us with time. We bless you and ask your wisdom and blessing here today. Please join us, Spirit of the North.

Oh Spirit of Mother Earth, you support us each day, welcoming our roots deep into your heart. You nurture and guide us finding sustenance and support. Help us to give thanks Always for Your bounty. We bless you and ask for your wisdom and blessing here today. Please join us Spirit of Mother Earth.

Oh Spirit of Father Sky, of the angelic realms, the countless stars of the night remind us that you are vast beautiful and majestic beyond all of our knowing or understanding. Your light shines upon the earth both day and night guiding our steps. We bless you and ask for your wisdom and blessing here today. Please join us, Father Sky.

Oh Spirit of our souls within, Place of union, love and reverence. We are grateful for this gift of life and for the love that guides our way. We open our hearts and join with all in love. It is begun.”

©08012016 Wolf Woman Ways

 

Joyess and Blessed First Harvest

lammas18

Enjoy your feasting with your family. Try having a whole loaf of bread instead of a pre-cut one. Bless this during your Lammas ritual before eating it. Then have your family and/or friend tear pieces off the loaf to partake in the Goddess and Horn Gods blessings. May your gardens or whatever you sewed at Beltane continue to grow into fruition

Blessings to you my dear ones.

Lammas A Time to Start Counting Your​ Blessings

Be Thankful Be Happy Pictures

Being a time for a first harvest, I think of all my family has accomplished so far this year and am very thankful that we all have warm, dry homes, enough food to fill our belly’s, appropriate clothes for all types of weather and most of us enough money to cover our bills. Plus the delicious tomatoes, banana peppers, green peppers, and cucumbers from our garden.

 

What dear ones are you thankful for during this first harvest celebration?

Lughnasadh Correspondences

Lughnasadh plate

The plate I painted for Lughnasadh.

Lughnasadh Altar 8-8-15

This is the altar I set up last year outside when I did a solitary ritual for Lughnasadh that I had written.

Lughnasadh Altar 2016

Here is a photo of my altar for Lughnasadh this year.

Lughnasadh Altar in a cup

Lughnasadh Altar in a Cup

Echinacea-Earth/ Inner strength

Juniper Berries-Air/ Get rid of negative or unwanted energies

Peppermint-Fire/ Abundance and opens up the breath and heart chakra and revives the mind

Raspberry Leaf-Water/ Protection

Here is a link with a lot of information for Lughnasadh:

https://www.goddessandgreenman.co.uk/lammas

Here is a link for a solo ritual for Lughnasadh:

https://spirallingleaf.wordpress.com/2016/07/27/lammas-lughnasadh-first-harvest-solo-ritual-circle-of-pagans/

Golden Lion Anointing Oil for Lughnasadh

2 drops Frankincense-Base

6 drops Geranium-Middle

2 drop Pettigrain-Top

3 drop Lime-Top

2 drop Sweet Orange-Top

Place 3 Tiger eye crystals in the bottle and then mix the oils with 1 t of Almond Oil.   Good to use at Lammas or in August, since it combines Leo and Sun energies.  Put on Flower of Life grid on top of Holly and place a Scapolite stone on top of the bottle.  Place Sunstone and Honey Calcite in the Merkaba shape and activate the grid.

Lughnasadh Oils

Lughnassadh Oil
2 parts lime oil
2 parts cinnamon oil
2 parts sandalwood oil
1 part clove oil
1 part frankincense oil

Mix well and bottle. Use in Lughnasadh/Lammas rituals.

Golden Lion Oil

Ingredients:

3 parts Frankincense

3 parts Petitgrain

2 parts Lime

1 parts Sweet Orange

Mix the above into 1/8 cup carrier oil such as jojoba, apricot, grapeseed, almond, etc. Good to use at Lammas or in August, since it combines Leo and Sun energies.

Lammas Oil #2

Ingredients:

1/4 dram thyme oil

1/2 dram cinnamon oil

1/4 dram rose oil

1/2 dram gardenia oil

2 – 3 drops allspice oil

Mix well and bottle. Use in Lughnasadh/Lammas rituals.

Lammas Oil #3

Ingredients:

2 tsp. wheat germ oil

6 drops frankincense oil

2 drops clary sage oil

1 drop rose oil

sunflower oil to make 2 TB.

Mix well and bottle. Use in Lughnasadh/Lammas rituals.

Leo Oil #1

To 2 ounces of base oil add 2 tablespoons of any of the following herbs: red sandalwood, frankincense, camphor, cassia, clove, goldenrod, greater celandine, eyebright, goats rue, chamomile, sunflower. Steep one moon cycle or for 12 – 24 hrs. on low in a slow cooker. If stronger scent is desired, remove herbs and repeat. Crack in 2 vitamin E capsules if preservative is desired. This is a good oil to use in rituals done during the zodiac sign of Leo.

Leo Oil #2

Ingredients:

3 drops Petitgrain

1 drop Orange

1 drop Lime

This is a good oil to use in rituals done during the zodiac sign of Leo or wear as a personal oil to increase your own powers.

Leo Zodiac Oil Blend
color – orange yellow

Ingredients:

frankincense (main)

sandalwood (minor)

orange (minor)

musk (minor)

patchouli (minor)

cinnamon (trace)

Add tiger’s eye or ruby to bottle. (Herbs and roots can be used to color the oil, if an all-natural product is desired. This list is from Jeanne Rose’s “Herbs and Things”: Orange Dye: annatto, gamboge or marigold.)

©07282016 Wolf Woman Ways

Lammas/Laughnasdh Ritual

This year ritual is borrowed from Patti Wigniigton on About com. To read all the information for this please click on the following link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/lammas/ht/LammasSacrifice.htm

I am sorry for taking an easy way out but because of pain from a medical problem, I have been unable to write one for us this time. There will be only a circle cast this time and no Watchtowers. Some traditions of The Craft do not call the Watchtowers.

Remember ALL Pagans are welcome to attend.

How To Hold a Lammas Harvest Ritual”

In some Pagan traditions, Lammas is the time of year when the Goddess takes on the aspects of the Harvest Mother. The earth is fruitful and abundant, crops are bountiful, and livestock are fattening up for winter. However, the Harvest Mother knows that the cold months are coming, and so she encourages us to begin gathering up what we can. This is the season for harvesting corn and grain, so that we can bake bread to store and have seeds for next year’s planting.

This ritual celebrates the beginning of the harvest season and the cycle of rebirth, and can be done by a solitary practitioner or adapted for a group or coven setting. Decorate your altar with symbols of the season — sickles and scythes, garden goodies like ivy and grapes and corn, poppies, dried grains, and early autumn foods like apples. If you like, light some Lammas Rebirth incense.

 

Have a candle on your altar to represent the Harvest Mother — choose something in orange, red or yellow.

These colors not only represent the blaze of the summer sun, but also the coming changes of autumn. You’ll also need a few stalks of wheat and an un-sliced loaf of bread (homemade is best, but if you can’t manage, a store-bought loaf will do). A goblet of ritual wine is optional. Also, if you have celiac disease or are otherwise sensitive to gluten, be sure to readCelebrating Lammas When You Eat Gluten-Free.

If your tradition requires you to cast a circle, do so now.

Light the candle, and say:

The Wheel of the Year has turned once more,
and the harvest will soon be upon us.
We have food on our tables, and
the soil is fertile.
Nature’s bounty, the gift of the earth,
gives us reasons to be thankful.
Mother of the Harvest, with your sickle and basket,
bless me with abundance and plenty.

Hold the stalks of wheat before you, [You can print a pictur of wheat stalks from an online picture] and think about what they symbolize: the power of the earth, the coming winter, the necessity of planning ahead. What do you need help planning right now? Are there sacrifices you should be making in the present that will be reaped in the future?

Rub the stalks between your fingers so a few grains of wheat fall upon the altar [Cut the picture into small pieces]. Scatter them on the ground as a gift to the earth. If you’re inside, leave them on the altar for now — you can always take them outside later. Say:

The power of the Harvest is within me.
As the seed falls to the earth and is reborn each year,
I too grow as the seasons change.
As the grain takes root in the fertile soil,
I too will find my roots and develop.
As the smallest seed blooms into a mighty stalk,
I too will bloom where I landed.
As the wheat is harvested and saved for winter,
I too will set aside that which I can use later.

Tear off a piece of the bread [From your own loaf or slice of whole wheat, if you eat it or feed the rest to the wildlife,]. If you’re performing this ritual as a group, pass the loaf around the circle so that each person present can take off a small chunk of bread. As each person passes the bread, they should say:

I pass to you this gift of the first harvest [Type this in after you have tore off your own piece of bread]. When everyone has a piece of bread [Has typed in the above sentence], say:

Everyone eats their bread together. If you have ritual wine [or your chosen beverage take a drink symbolic of passing it around] pass it around the circle for people to wash the bread down. Once everyone has finished their bread], take a moment to meditate on the cycle of rebirth and how it applies to your own life – physically, emotionally, spiritually. When you are ready, if you have cast a circle, close it or dismiss the quarters at this time. Otherwise, simply end the ritual in the manner of your tradition.

 

Lughnasadh / Lammas

At Lammas, sometimes called Lughnasadh, it’s time to celebrate the first harvest of the year, and recognize that the hot summer days will soon come to an end.   The plants of spring wither and drop seeds to ensure future crops. Grains are ready to be harvested and the fruits are ripe for picking.  We can give thanks for the food on our tables.

Lughnasadh means the funeral games of Lugh (pronounced Loo), referring to Lugh, the sun god. However, the funeral is not his own, but the funeral games he hosts in honor of his foster-mother Tailte. For that reason, the traditional Tailtean craft fairs and Tailtean marriages (which last for a year and a day) are also celebrated at this time.

To read the rest of this article click on this link : https://wicca.com/celtic/akasha/lammas.htm