Imbolc in the Southern Hemisphere

Imbolc will soon be here in the southern hemisphere. I put this first article together for the latest edition of the Axis Mundi and have also included a second Imbolc article from the August 2008 edition of the AM.

Imbolc ~ 1st August

by Jenwytch

Imbolc is a cross-quarter day midway between the winter solstice (Yule) and the spring equinox (Ostara) and is the celebration of the banishing of winter, the imminent arrival of Spring and the stirring of new life in the earth. Imbolc recognizes the maiden aspect of the triple goddess – the fresh, the young, the naïve, the new – and is strongly connected with the Goddess Brigid. It is associated with and also known as the festivals of Oimelc, Imbolg, Imbolic (Irish), Candlemas (British), Feast of Torches, Lupercalia (Italian/Latin), Brigid’s Day, and Brigantia (Scottish).

Here in the southern hemisphere, in 21st century Australia,

To read the rest please click on this link: Imbolc

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Imbolc in the Southern Hemisphere

by Jenwytch

POSTED ON JULY 20, 2010 BY JENWYTCH AT THE OTHER SIDE. THIS ARTICLE IS ALSO IN THE JULY 2010 EDITION OF THE “AXIS MUNDI”.

Imbolc is a cross-quarter day midway between the winter solstice (Yule) and the spring equinox (Ostara) and is the celebration of the banishing of winter, the imminent arrival of Spring and the stirring of new life in the earth. Imbolc recognizes the maiden aspect of the triple goddess – the fresh, the young, the naïve, the new – and is strongly connected with the Goddess Brigid. It is associated with and also known as the festivals of Oimelc, Imbolg, Imbolic (Irish), Candlemas (British), Feast of Torches, Lupercalia (Italian/Latin), Brigid’s Day, and Brigantia (Scottish).

Here in the southern hemisphere, in 21st century Australia, we are far removed from the climate and rural lifestyles of the people of ancient Europe where this festival, and others that make up the Wheel Of The Year, originated.

Due to the 6 month offset of the seasons between the northern and southern hemispheres …

To read this rest of this article please click on this link: Imbolc in the Southern Hemisphere

Southern Hemisphere Sabbat Dates

Traditional Dates ‘Exact’ Times & Dates **
Lughnasadh/Lammas February 2 February 4, 2017 1:27AM
Mabon (Autumnal Equinox) March 21 March 20, 2017 8:29PM
Samhain April 30/May 1 May 5, 2017 5:28PM
Yule (Winter Solstice) June 21 June 21, 2017 2:24PM
Imbolc August 1 August 7, 2017 5:40PM
Ostara (Vernal/Spring Equinox) September 21 September 23, 2017 6:02AM
Beltaine October 31 November 7, 2017 3:25PM
Litha (Summer Solstice) December 21 December 22, 2017 2:28AM
** Exact dates and times are from http://www.archaeoastronomy.com/2017.html – Equinox and Solstice data from the U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington DC. Cross-Quarter moments are interpolated as the midway points between the Solstices and Equinoxes measured in degrees along the ecliptic. Former NASA scientist Rollin Gillespie uses this spatial method rather than simply splitting in half the time interval between a Solstice and an Equinox.)

The Wheel of the Year…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Southern Hemisphere Holiday Dates 2017

Imbolc in the Southern Hemisphere

Imbolc will soon be here in the southern hemisphere. I put this first article together for the latest edition of the Axis Mundi and have also included a second Imbolc article from the August 2008 edition of the AM.

Imbolc ~ 1st August

by Jenwytch

Imbolc is a cross-quarter day midway between the winter solstice (Yule) and the spring equinox (Ostara) and is the celebration of the banishing of winter, the imminent arrival of Spring and the stirring of new life in the earth. Imbolc recognizes the maiden aspect of the triple goddess – the fresh, the young, the naïve, the new – and is strongly connected with the Goddess Brigid. It is associated with and also known as the festivals of Oimelc, Imbolg, Imbolic (Irish), Candlemas (British), Feast of Torches, Lupercalia (Italian/Latin), Brigid’s Day, and Brigantia (Scottish).

Here in the southern hemisphere, in 21st century Australia, we are far removed from the climate and rural lifestyles of the people of ancient Europe where this festival, and others that make up the Wheel Of The Year, originated. (See my article [below] in an earlier edition of Axis Mundi for more about the history and origins of Imbolc.)

Due to the 6 month offset of the seasons between the northern and southern hemispheres many Australian Pagans prefer to celebrate Imbolc when it is seasonally appropriate here, on August 1st or 2nd, instead of on the traditional northern hemisphere date of February 2nd. Although the majority of modern day Aussie Pagans live in cities or the suburbs we can still look to our backyard gardens, public suburban parks or the National Parks and bushland reserves scattered all around us to see evidence of the cycle of the seasons relevant to this time of year.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Imbolc

Blessings of Imbolc and February!

This comes from an email I received today from Mystery School of the Goddess

More than ever, we need to embrace our powerful, spiritual centers and call in our Woman Wisdom. February is a very special month as we celebrate Imbolc, Brigid’s Day, Vasant Panchami – Saraswati’s Birthday, Orisha Goddess OYA’s Feast Day, and Aphrodite’s Feast Day all in the first week of the month!

We are gathering with Goddesses of Power, Passion, and Purpose that can infuse our practices, inspire our creativity, and give us a potent center of purpose.

As well, February is an eclipse month this year with a Full Moon Lunar Eclipse on February 10 and a New Moon Solar Eclipse on February 26. Eclipses bring sudden endings AND beginnings. These particular eclipses will also be highlighting the theme of balance – our needs versus our wants, our physical health versus our mental health. Jupiter turns retrograde on February 5 and that may affect our lack and luck mentality. Stay tuned to MotherHouse of the Goddess Astrology updates from Mary Lomando for more information.

Consider February a final “Spring” cleaning that is preparing us for the NEW of Spring Equinox in March. Think about what is working for you and what needs to be released. Time to review and adjust your intentions for the year and prepare to make positive use of the fertility of the Equinox!

 

 

Imbolic 2017 is on Thursday, February 2, 2017: Imbolic Question?

Thursday, February 2, 2017 is Imbolic 2017. Imbolc or Imbolg (pronounced or ), also called (Saint) Brighid’s Day (, , ), is a Gaelic festival marking the beginning of spring.

said to take the form of a

Imbolc or Imbolg (pronounced or ), also called (Saint) Brighid’s Day (, , ), is a Gaelic festival marking the beginning of spring.

Groundhog Day and Candlemas-USA

You might be wondering why I posted this. If you either read to the point of how Groundhog day got started or just scroll down to it you will see it tied into Candlemas/Imbolc.

Groundhog sees his shadow, predicts six more weeks of winter

There will be six more weeks of winter, according to America’s favorite groundhog.

Every Feb. 2, the marmot known as Punxsutawney Phil emerges from his burrow in western Pennsylvania and looks to the ground for his shadow — marking the annual celebration of Groundhog Day.

A local morning weather story, an excuse to relive the comedic Bill Murray cinematic classic, a legendary way to get your predictions around the start of spring — Groundhog Day is all of these things and more. While many look forward to and enjoy Phil’s February appearance, others are unsure what the prediction fuss is all about.

Get the information you need on Groundhog Day with answers to these frequently asked questions:

When did Groundhog Day start?

Groundhog Day stems from an ancient European celebration of Candlemas. A midway point between the winter solstice and spring equinox, legend has it that fair weather on Candlemas predicated a stormy and cold second half to winter. The celebration transformed in America, where Pennsylvania Germans incorporated the groundhog into the meteorologic prognostication

Where did Punxsutawney Phil get his name?

The largest Groundhog Day celebration is held in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, after which Phil is named.

How many Punxsutawney Phil groundhogs have there been?

While the lifespan of a groundhog is roughly six years, those in the Groundhog Club’s Inner Circle lightheartedly claim there is only one Phil, and all other groundhogs are impostors. It is also claimed that one groundhog has lived since 1886 — sustained by a drink of “groundhog punch.” It is unknown how many groundhogs have actually played Phil.

What happens if Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow?

If the groundhog sees his shadow, legend has it there will be six more weeks of winter. If he doesn’t see his shadow, this implies an early spring.

How many times has Punxsutawney Phil seen his shadow?

Since 1887, the groundhog has seen his shadow 102 times — forecasting a longer winter — and not seen it 18 times.

How “right” is Phil?

Since 1988, the groundhog correctly predicted the weather 14 times and incorrectly 15 times. This is determined based on cross-referencing Phil’s prediction with the national average temperature for the remainder of February.

RELATED: Groundhog Day through the years

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