The Great Horned God

The Great Horned GodThe consort of the Goddess and symbol of male energy in the form of the divine, The Horned God reigns. He is the lord of the woodlands, the hunt and animals. He provides for the tribe through the hunt and is honored or rewarded for his deed by being permitted to copulate with the Goddess through the Great Rite. The Horned God is is the lord of life, death and the underworld. And is the Sun to the Goddess’ Moon. He alternates with the Goddess in ruling over the fertility cycle of birth, death and rebirth. He is born at the winter solstice, unites with the Goddess in marriage at Bealtaine, and dies at the summer solstice to bring fertility to the land as the Sacred King. He is not just a Celtic representation of the God, nor does he solely belong to Wicca, as he has been associated with many deities throughout the world.

  • Cernunnos, The Celtic God of fertility, animals and the underworld.
  • Herne The Hunter, a specter of Britain.
  • Pan the Greek god of the woodlands,
  • Janus the Roman god of good beings.
  • Tammuz and Damuzi, the son, lover and consorts to Ishtar and Inanna.
  • Osiris, the Egyptian Lord of the underworld.
  • Dionysus, the Greek god of vegetation and vine.
  • The Green Man, the lord of vegetation and the woodlands.

The History Of The Horned One…

To read the rest of this please click on this link: https://www.paganspath.com/magik/hornedgod.htm

 

Who Are the Wiccan Horned God and Triple Goddess?

By Mackenzie Sage Wright – A Wiccan of 25 years, Sage likes to put her background as a writer and teacher to use by helping people learn about this NeoPagan path

The Horned God and Triple Goddess are generally the deities you’ll hear people associate with Wicca, but these very same concepts generate a lot of confusion. You’ll read a lot of books that will tell you the Horned God is like this, or the Triple Goddess is like that. There are a lot of oversimplifications and generalizations going on with these descriptions. Many Wiccan sources also refer to the Lord and Lady as well, or “The” God, and “The” Goddess (the article “the” implying they’re specific deities). This leaves people to wonder— to whom, exactly, are we referring when we use these terms?

Wicca, being a 20th century religion, is fairly unique in one way: we don’t actually have our own deities. That is, our religion wasn’t built around veneration of any specific deities of our own—we worship Pagan Gods and Goddesses of other ancient cultures in a new and modern world. We do not have our own unique pantheon, nor do we believe our religion was revealed to us by deities.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link or copy and paste this link into your browser: https://exemplore.com/wicca-witchcraft/Wicca-for-Beginners-Who-Is-the-Horned-God-and-the-Triple-Goddess

Working With Pagan Gods and Goddesses By Patti Wigington (Part 2)

Appropriate Worship – Honoring the Gods the Right Way

One issue that comes up often for people learning about modern Pagan spirituality is the concept of appropriate worship. There tends to be some question about what, exactly, is the right offering to make to the gods or goddesses of one’s tradition — and how we should honor them when making those offerings.

NOT ALL GODS ARE THE SAME

Let’s imagine that you have two friends. First, we have Jill. She likes French cuisine, Meg Ryan movies, soft music and expensive wine.

She’s someone who lets you cry on her shoulder when you’re feeling blue, and she offers some wise and thoughtful insight when you can’t solve a problem on your own. One of her best qualities is her ability to listen.

You also have a friend named Steve. He’s a lot of fun, and sometimes shows up at your house at midnight toting a six-pack. Steve likes watching movies with lots of explosions, took you to your first Metallica concert, and can rebuild a Harley with his eyes closed. He eats mostly bratwurst and Funyuns, enjoys picking up strippers at bars, and is the guy you call when you want to have a good time.

When Jill comes over, are you going to have a nice quiet dinner with a glass of wine and Josh Groban playing in the background, or are you going to hand her a cheeseburger and a beer, pull out the Wii for a round of God of War, and stay up until 3 am seeing who can burp and fart the loudest?

Likewise, if Steve shows up, are you going to do things that he enjoys, or are you going to say, “Hey, Steve, let’s watch Steel Magnolias and talk about our feelings?

WHAT DO YOUR GODS WANT?

((remember this is only one person’s suggestions if you feel another way is apropreite then do it that way) To read the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/appropriate-worship-honoring-the-gods-2561946?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170321&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Working With Pagan Gods and Goddesses by Patti Wigington (Part 1)

While some traditions of Wicca and Paganism honor an all-encompassing “The God” or “The Goddess,” others worship specific deities. Let’s look at some of the gods and goddesses found in contemporary traditions, and how you can work with them in your daily practice.

Offerings to the Gods

What’s an Acceptable Gift?

In many Pagan and Wiccan traditions, it’s not uncommon to make some sort of offering or sacrifice to the gods. Bear in mind that despite the reciprocal nature of our relationship with the divine, it’s not a matter of “I’m offering you this stuff so you’ll grant my wish.” It’s more along the lines of “I honor you and respect you, so I’m giving you this stuff to show you how much I appreciate your intervention on my behalf.

So the question arises, then, of what to offer them? Different types of deities seem to respond best to different kinds of offerings. For example, you wouldn’t offer flowers to a war god, would you? When making an offering, it’s important to think about what the god represents.

The Roman Cato described an offering for agricultural prosperity: Make offerings to keep your oxen in good health. Make the following sacrifices to Mars… three pounds of wheat, four-and-a-half of lard, four-and-a-half of meat and three pints of wine. While it’s probably not necessary to go that far and offer up enough food to feed a small army to your god, the passage does illustrate the fact that our ancestors thought enough of their gods to take their offerings very seriously.

More importantly than thinking about what the gods represent to you personally, though, is to pay attention to what they have demanded of others in the past.

 

(Remember this is one persons suggestions if you feel something else is more aporpreite then use it.) The rea f thi article can be read by using thi link: https://www.thoughtco.com/offerings-to-the-gods-2561949?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170321&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

 

Moon Gods and Moon Goddesses

Index of moon gods and goddesses

Westerners are familiar with (female) moon goddesses. Our word lunar, as in the lunar cycle of full, crescent, and new moons, comes from the feminine Latin Luna. This seems natural because of the association of the lunar month and the female menstrual cycle, but not all societies envision the moon as a woman. In the Bronze Age, the East, from Anatolia to Sumer and Egypt, had (male) moon gods [Source: “The Myth of Europa and Minos,” by P. B. S. Andrews. Greece & Rome, Vol. 16, No. 1 (Apr., 1969), pp. 60-66]. Here are some of the moon gods and moon goddesses of major ancient religions.

01
of 12
Arma

Nationality: Hittite
Moon God

Arma is the name of a Hittite lunar personification whom some think is connected with the Greek god Hermes.

Reference: “Hittite Ritual at Sardis,” by Noel Robertson. Classical Antiquity, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Apr., 1982), pp. 122-140

For pictures and to read the rest of the index created by N.S. Gill please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/moon-gods-and-moon-goddesses-120395

Flashback 2008 – Winter Solstice

Yule

At Yule, the Oak King who rules during the waxing year conquers the Holly King in order to reign until Midsummer, when the two meet again. It is believed that the Holly King has evolved into the modern day Santa Claus, wearing red, with holly in his hat. His eight deer represent the Pagan sabbats, as animals as regarded scared by the Celtic gods. Although the Oak King and the Holly King are opposing forces at Litha and Yule, they com[lement each other. In ancient times, the Sun’s return after a long period of scarcity and darkness affirmed survival and resilience in the winter season.

A few days before Yule, decorate your home with oranges studded with cloves to release a warm, yuletide aroma. It’s time to feast, exchange gifts, and thank the Goddess for the return of abundance and light. At your Yule gathering, cozy up up to your favorite people and enjoy some delicious mulled red wine infused with cinnamon sticks and whole cloves. Serve warm in chalices, with a sprinkling of nutmeg, to toast the rebirth of the Oak King. When you take a sip from the chalice, hold hands with your guests and shout, “Wassail” – the old English word for “your health”

Copyright Emely Flak – Llewellyn Witches’ Datebook 2008 Pg 129

A List of Some of The Goddesses and Gods of Healing

Gods and Goddesses of Healing

Instead of copying and pasting all eighteen of the deities and their information I’m just going to give you the link to the article by Patti Wigington on About.com. When I did a general search on Google for “healing gods” a lot of possibilities came up but as I really like the way Ms Wigington presents stuff I choose to go with her article.

http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/godsandgoddesses/ss/Gods-And-Goddesses-Of-Healing.htm

If you know the names of other Gods and/or Goddesses know for their healing abilities please post them in the comment section below. One goddess I was surprised not to see on her list is Kwan Yin, an oriental goddess known to help with depression and comforting people who call upon her.

God/Goddess Healing Ritual

For those of us who want to do something privately for Lady A or even someone else that needs healing, I found this relatively easy healing ritual by Patti Wigington on About.com. Here is the link if you want to check out the article or others on various subjects on the About.com’s website: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/wiccanandpaganrituals/a/God-Goddess-Healing-Ritual.htm (This article has not been changed in any way by myself, so any typos were already there.)

Updated May 01, 2016.

This ritual is one which can be done on behalf of an ill friend or family member. They do not have to be present for you to do this ritual. In many traditions it is customary to at least ask permission before doing healing (or any other sort of) magic. However, it is often acceptable to assume you have implied permission – in other words, if you believe in good faith that the individual would want you to perform this rite on their behalf, then you may go ahead and do so without specifically asking for their approval in advance. Follow the guidelines of your own tradition’s belief system and ethical standards.

Keep in mind that someone who is terminally ill may not wish to live longer, and may instead be wishing for release from their pain. As a contrast, someone who is suffering from an acute illness rather than a long-term one may simply want to feel better immediately.

This ritual asks the goddess (or god) of your tradition to watch over the ailing individual and assist them with healing.

There are a number of different deities associated with healing, from a variety of different pantheons. If your particular flavor of Paganism doesn’t have a god or goddess of healing, consider using one of these:

Celtic:

Greek:

Norse:

Roman:

Egyptian:

Yoruba:

You will need the following items:

  • A small (votive or even tealight size) white candle to represent the individual for whom you are doing the ritual
  • Healing incense (loose blend) of allspice, bay, yarrow, apple blossoms, lemon balm, cinnamon
  • A candle in any color representing the god or goddess you wish to petition for assistance

Begin by casting a circle, if your tradition requires you to do so. Set up your altar as you normally would, placing the god/goddess candle behind the individual candle. In this sample ritual template, we will be using Brighid, but you should substitute the name of the deity upon whom you are calling when you perform this rite.

Say:

I call upon you, Brighid, in a time of need.
I ask your assistance and blessing, for one who is ailing.
[Name] is ill, and she needs your healing light.
I ask you to watch over her and give her strength,
Keep her safe from further illness, and protect her body and soul.
I ask you, great Brighid, to heal her in this time of sickness.

Place the loose incense blend on your brazier (or, if you don’t use a brazier for incense, use a charcoal disc in a bowl or plate) and light it. As the smoke begins to rise, envision your friend’s illness wafting away with the smoke.

Brighid, I ask you to take away [Name]’s illness,
Carry it out to the four winds, never to return.
To the north, take this illness away and replace it with health.
To the east, take this illness away, and replace it with strength.
To the south, take this illness away, and replace it with vitality.
To the west, take this illness away, and replace it with life.
Carry it away from [Name], Brighid, that it may scatter and be no more.

Light the candle representing the god or goddess.

Hail to you, powerful Brighid, I pay you tribute.
I honor you and ask this one small gift.
May your light and strength wash over [Name],
Supporting her in her this time of need.

Use the flame on the deity candle to light the smaller candle, representing your friend.

[Name], I light this candle in your honor tonight.
It is lit from the fires of Brighid, and she will watch over you.
She will guide you and heal you, and ease your suffering.
May Brighid continue to care for you and embrace you in her light.

Take a few moments to meditate on what you really wish for your friend. Once you have finished, allow the candles to burn out on their own if possible.

The Charge of the God

The Charge of the God is a newer more recent addition to Wiccan ritual. No one charge has risen above the others yet to gain popularity so you will hear many different ones based solely on which God and which attributes of the God the Wiccan wants to invoke at a given ritual.

Below are some of my favorite ones. Since true Wicca is about balance between feminine and masculine energy, I think a Charge of the God is very appropriate when invoking both Deities.

Listen to the words of the Great Father, who of old was called Osiris, Adonis, Zeus, Thor, Pan, Cernunnos, Herne, Lugh and by may other names:

“My Law is Harmony with all things. Mine is the secret that opens the gates of life and mine is the dish of salt of the earth that is the body of Cernunnos that is the eternal circle of rebirth. I give the knowledge of life everlasting, and beyond death I give the promise of regeneration and renewal. I am the sacrifice, the father of all things, and my protection blankets the earth.”

Hear the words of the dancing God, the music of whose laughter stirs the winds, whose voice calls the seasons:

“I who am the Lord of the Hunt and the Power of the Light, sun among the clouds and the secret of the flame, I call upon your bodies to arise and come unto me. For I am the flesh of the earth and all it’s beings. Through me all things must die and with me are reborn. Let my worship be in the body that sings, for behold all acts of willing sacrifice are my rituals. Let there be desire and fear, anger and weakness, joy and peace, awe and longing within you. For these too are part of the mysteries found within yourself, within me, all beginnings have endings, and all endings have beginnings.”

So Mote It BE!

To read other versions please click on this link http://blessedbe.sugarbane.com/god.htm