HEKATE (or Hecate)

HEKATE (Hecate) was the goddess of magic, witchcraft, the night, moon, ghosts and necromancy. She was the only child of the Titanes Perses and Asteria from whom she received her power over heaven, earth, and sea.

Hekate assisted Demeter in her search for Persephone, guiding her through the night with flaming torches. After the mother-daughter reunion became she Persephone’s minister and companion in Haides.

Three metamorphosis myths describe the origins of her animal familiars: the black she-dog and the polecat (a mustelid house pet kept by the ancients to hunt vermin). The dog was the Trojan Queen Hekabe (Hecuba) who leapt into the sea after the fall of Troy and was transformed by the goddess. The polecat was either the witch Gale, turned as punishment for her incontinence, or Galinthias, midwife of Alkmene (Alcmena), who was transformed by the enraged goddess Eileithyia but adopted by the sympathetic Hekate.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: http://www.theoi.com/Khthonios/Hekate.html

13 Things You Don’t Need to Know About the Triple Goddess (but are kind of interesting) by John Halstead

1. Gerald Gardner did not worship the Triple Goddess. Gerald Gardner, the father of Wicca, did not mention a Triple Goddess in his “Book of Shadows”.  Nor does Gardner mention a Triple Goddess in Witchcraft Today, which was published in 1954.  He does mention a Triple Goddess in his book, The Meaning of Witchcraft, published in 1959, but only briefly.  Similarly, Raymond Buckland, who is credited with bringing Gardnerian witchcraft to America does not mention the Triple Goddess in Witchcraft from the Inside (1971) or his book, Tree: The Complete Book of Saxon Witchcraft (1974). The Triple Goddess is mentioned only briefly in his best-selling Buckland’s Complete Book of Witchcraft (1986), published twelve years later, and with no exposition.

2.  Gerald Gardner visited Robert Graves.  In 1961, Idries Shah brought Gardner to visit Graves at his home on the island of Majorca.  (Fred Adams, the founder of Feraferia, also visited Graves in 1959.)  Gardner did write an essay about the Triple Goddess entitled “The Triad of the Goddess”.  (I am grateful to Morgan Davis of geraldgardner.com for drawing my attention to this essay.  I’ll be glad to email a .pdf of the document to anyone who requests or you can download it here.)  The essay was found among Gardner’s papers which were purchased by Ripley’s from Gardner’s Witchcraft Museum.  Unfortunately, the essay is undated.  (I have seen someone else give it a date of 1958, but in any case, it appears to have been written after Gardner read Graves.)  In the essay, Gardner describes the “triad of the Goddess” as “LOVE:DEATH:REBIRTH” and compares it to the Christian Trinity and to the triad of “Vrahmin, Vishnu and Siva”.  Gardner argues that the death aspect is misinterpreted as a “Hag aspect” (here he seems to be responding to Graves), and that the true death aspect is not frightening, but comforting.  This is consistent with Gardner’s conception of the Goddess as “light” and the God as “dark”.

3.  Robert Graves wrote about the Triple Goddess before he wrote The White Goddess.  Many Pagans will know that Robert Graves described the Triple Goddess in his book The White Goddess, published in 1948.  But four years earlier, in Hercules, My Shipmate, or The Golden Fleece, which describes the ascendancy of the Olympian gods over the Triple Goddess, he described the Goddess as Maiden, Nymph and Mother, corresponding to the New Moon, Full Moon, and Old Moon.  Then, in 1946, Graves published King Jesus, where he described a Great Triple Moon Goddess of birth, love, and death.  In the narrative, the Triple Goddess takes the form of Miriam (Jesus’ mother), Mary of Cleopas (Jesus’ potential wife), and Mary Magdalene (a witch who is a disciple of the old goddess religion).

4.  The Triple Goddess was not always Maiden-Mother-Crone…

To read the rest of this article please click on or copy and paste this link into your browser: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/allergicpagan/2014/11/19/13-things-you-dont-need-to-know-about-the-triple-goddess-but-are-kind-of-interesting/

The Triple Goddess The Original Holy Trinity

The Triple Goddess is a term first popularised by the poet and scholar Robert Graves in the 20th century. He depicted the triplicity as Maiden, Mother and Crone and many neo-pagans have followed this imagery. While some scholars attributed the idea to the lively imagination of the poet, recent archaeology has made it abundantly clear that “Goddess Triplicities” are to be found throughout ancient Europe.

In Hinduism today, the triplicity of the Goddess in Shakta worship is of cardinal importance, and outside the Indo-European world the Triple Goddess is found in Africa and Asia.

How should the devotee of Our Mother God understand this universal image?

While many of us contemplate the single image of Our Mother, there has always been an important Trinitarian aspect to Her worship. Ironically the great Christian theologian, St. Augustine, mocked the pagans for their belief that the Triple Goddess could be One and also Three. After his conversion he found himself defending the masculinised version of the same doctrine!

There are, as usual, various patriarchal stumbling-blocks to avoid. The most prominent is the attempt to assimilate all three aspects of Dea to the moon. This, of course, comes from the early patriarchal phenomenon that archaeologists call “solarisation” – the process of re-assigning the higher (Solar and Celestial) symbolism to the masculine image and leaving the feminine with the lower (Lunar and Earthly) aspects.

Actually, the lunar aspect of the Trinity is the Daughter, and the contrast between the Solar Mother and Lunar Daughter is one of the beautiful and powerful aspects of Trinitarian Déanism.

The Thealogy of the Triple Goddess…

To read the rest of this article please click on or copy and paste this or into your browser:   http://www.mother-god.com/triple-goddess.html

Who Are the Wiccan Horned God and Triple Goddess?

By Mackenzie Sage Wright – A Wiccan of 25 years, Sage likes to put her background as a writer and teacher to use by helping people learn about this NeoPagan path

The Horned God and Triple Goddess are generally the deities you’ll hear people associate with Wicca, but these very same concepts generate a lot of confusion. You’ll read a lot of books that will tell you the Horned God is like this, or the Triple Goddess is like that. There are a lot of oversimplifications and generalizations going on with these descriptions. Many Wiccan sources also refer to the Lord and Lady as well, or “The” God, and “The” Goddess (the article “the” implying they’re specific deities). This leaves people to wonder— to whom, exactly, are we referring when we use these terms?

Wicca, being a 20th century religion, is fairly unique in one way: we don’t actually have our own deities. That is, our religion wasn’t built around veneration of any specific deities of our own—we worship Pagan Gods and Goddesses of other ancient cultures in a new and modern world. We do not have our own unique pantheon, nor do we believe our religion was revealed to us by deities.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link or copy and paste this link into your browser: https://exemplore.com/wicca-witchcraft/Wicca-for-Beginners-Who-Is-the-Horned-God-and-the-Triple-Goddess

Working With Pagan Gods and Goddesses By Patti Wigington (Part 2)

Appropriate Worship – Honoring the Gods the Right Way

One issue that comes up often for people learning about modern Pagan spirituality is the concept of appropriate worship. There tends to be some question about what, exactly, is the right offering to make to the gods or goddesses of one’s tradition — and how we should honor them when making those offerings.

NOT ALL GODS ARE THE SAME

Let’s imagine that you have two friends. First, we have Jill. She likes French cuisine, Meg Ryan movies, soft music and expensive wine.

She’s someone who lets you cry on her shoulder when you’re feeling blue, and she offers some wise and thoughtful insight when you can’t solve a problem on your own. One of her best qualities is her ability to listen.

You also have a friend named Steve. He’s a lot of fun, and sometimes shows up at your house at midnight toting a six-pack. Steve likes watching movies with lots of explosions, took you to your first Metallica concert, and can rebuild a Harley with his eyes closed. He eats mostly bratwurst and Funyuns, enjoys picking up strippers at bars, and is the guy you call when you want to have a good time.

When Jill comes over, are you going to have a nice quiet dinner with a glass of wine and Josh Groban playing in the background, or are you going to hand her a cheeseburger and a beer, pull out the Wii for a round of God of War, and stay up until 3 am seeing who can burp and fart the loudest?

Likewise, if Steve shows up, are you going to do things that he enjoys, or are you going to say, “Hey, Steve, let’s watch Steel Magnolias and talk about our feelings?

WHAT DO YOUR GODS WANT?

((remember this is only one person’s suggestions if you feel another way is apropreite then do it that way) To read the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/appropriate-worship-honoring-the-gods-2561946?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170321&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Working With Pagan Gods and Goddesses by Patti Wigington (Part 1)

While some traditions of Wicca and Paganism honor an all-encompassing “The God” or “The Goddess,” others worship specific deities. Let’s look at some of the gods and goddesses found in contemporary traditions, and how you can work with them in your daily practice.

Offerings to the Gods

What’s an Acceptable Gift?

In many Pagan and Wiccan traditions, it’s not uncommon to make some sort of offering or sacrifice to the gods. Bear in mind that despite the reciprocal nature of our relationship with the divine, it’s not a matter of “I’m offering you this stuff so you’ll grant my wish.” It’s more along the lines of “I honor you and respect you, so I’m giving you this stuff to show you how much I appreciate your intervention on my behalf.

So the question arises, then, of what to offer them? Different types of deities seem to respond best to different kinds of offerings. For example, you wouldn’t offer flowers to a war god, would you? When making an offering, it’s important to think about what the god represents.

The Roman Cato described an offering for agricultural prosperity: Make offerings to keep your oxen in good health. Make the following sacrifices to Mars… three pounds of wheat, four-and-a-half of lard, four-and-a-half of meat and three pints of wine. While it’s probably not necessary to go that far and offer up enough food to feed a small army to your god, the passage does illustrate the fact that our ancestors thought enough of their gods to take their offerings very seriously.

More importantly than thinking about what the gods represent to you personally, though, is to pay attention to what they have demanded of others in the past.

 

(Remember this is one persons suggestions if you feel something else is more aporpreite then use it.) The rea f thi article can be read by using thi link: https://www.thoughtco.com/offerings-to-the-gods-2561949?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170321&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

 

Moon Gods and Moon Goddesses

Index of moon gods and goddesses

Westerners are familiar with (female) moon goddesses. Our word lunar, as in the lunar cycle of full, crescent, and new moons, comes from the feminine Latin Luna. This seems natural because of the association of the lunar month and the female menstrual cycle, but not all societies envision the moon as a woman. In the Bronze Age, the East, from Anatolia to Sumer and Egypt, had (male) moon gods [Source: “The Myth of Europa and Minos,” by P. B. S. Andrews. Greece & Rome, Vol. 16, No. 1 (Apr., 1969), pp. 60-66]. Here are some of the moon gods and moon goddesses of major ancient religions.

01
of 12
Arma

Nationality: Hittite
Moon God

Arma is the name of a Hittite lunar personification whom some think is connected with the Greek god Hermes.

Reference: “Hittite Ritual at Sardis,” by Noel Robertson. Classical Antiquity, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Apr., 1982), pp. 122-140

For pictures and to read the rest of the index created by N.S. Gill please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/moon-gods-and-moon-goddesses-120395

Imbloc (Candlemass, Imblog, Imbole) – February 2nd

Pronounced: EE-Molc
Incense: Rosemary, Frankincense, Myrrh, Cinnamon
Decorations: Corn Dolly, Besom, Spring Flowers
Colours: White, Orange, Red

This holiday is also known as Candlemas, or Brigid’s (pronounced BREED) Day. One of the 4 Celtic “Fire Festivals. Commemorates the changing of the Goddess from the Crone to the Maiden. Celebrates the first signs of Spring. Also called “Imbolc” (the old Celtic name).

This is the seasonal change where the first signs of spring and the return of the sun are noted, i.e. the first sprouting of leaves, the sprouting of the Crocus flowers etc. In other words, it is the festival commemorating the successful passing of winter and the beginning of the agricultural year. This Festival also marks the transition point of the threefold Goddess energies from those of Crone to Maiden.

To read the rest of this fastening article please click on this link: http://www.thewhitegoddess.co.uk/the_wheel_of_the_year/imbolc.asp

It is the day that we celebrate the passing of Winter and make way for Spring. It is the day we honour the rebirth of the Sun and we may visualize the baby sun nursing from the Goddess’s breast. It is also a day of celebrating the Celtic Goddess Brigid. Brigid is the Goddess of Poetry, Healing, Smithcraft, and Midwifery. If you can make it with your hands, Brigid rules it. She is a triple Goddess, so we honour her in all her aspects. This is a time for communing with her, and tending the lighting of her sacred flame. At this time of year, Wiccans will light multiple candles, white for Brigid, for the god usually yellow or red, to remind us of the passing of winter and the entrance into spring, the time of the Sun. This is a good time for initiations, be they into covens or self-initiations.

The Celtic Hearth Goddess Brighid

Brighid was a Celtic hearth goddess who is still celebrated today in many parts of Europe and the British Isles. She is honored primarily at Imbolc, on February 2, and is a goddess who represents the homefires and domesticity of family life. Be sure to read our collection of articles related to this powerful triune goddess.
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Who Is Goddess, What Is Goddess – We Are Goddess

http://www.spiralgoddess.com/Goddess101.html

Look and Know The Spiral She…

The Goddess that Spirals both from the inside out and from the outside in. She is Me and I am We. We are not just the Birther, The Nurturer.  She is the Warrior, I am the Sorceress, We are The Passion, The Creator and the Spirit. 

I am She, She is Me and I am We. 

Please Click onto the Links and discover The She, The Goddess..

Brightest Blessings, SunRay Sorceress

 

This Amazon is famous in their traditions: her house or dairy of stone is yet extant; some of the inhabitants dwell in it all summer, though it be some hundred years old; the whole is built of stone, without any wood, lime, earth, or mortar to cement it, and is built in form of a circle pyramid-wise towards the top, having a vent in it, the fire being always in the centre of the floor; the stones are long and thin, which supplies the defect of wood; the body of this house contains not above nine persons sitting; there are three beds or low vaults that go off the side of the wall, a pillar betwixt each bed, which contains five men apiece; at the entry to one of these low vaults is a stone standing upon one end fix’d; upon this they say she ordinarily laid her helmet; there are two stones on the other side, upon which she is reported to have laid her sword: she is said to have been much addicted to hunting, and that in her time all the space betwixt this isle and that of Harries, was one continued tract of dry land.[21]

  • Martin Martin 1697