Pantheon- People never really stopped believing.

March 24th 2018

Written By Hypatia Of Alexandrea for Coven Life


I started to think back to when I first started observing the different Gods and Goddesses in their glory. Coming from a Christian religion and believing that there was only one God it was difficult for me to truly grasp the Many.

Slowly converting from the monotheistic strict religious guidelines I come to realize that the One was once Many. In other words before monotheism came along there was of course many God’s observed, especially by the very creators of the now dominant monotheistic religions.

The Gods of the Pantheons became rolled into one and most others were given the titles of angels and saints. This is evident in the Orthodox Christian religion where some Gods and Goddesses have the title of saints such as Athena, Apollo, Aphrodite, Artemis and the list goes on!

These Gods never ceased to be observed, they were merely converted into saints and most of the time celebrated accordingly to their healing qualities that are connected to their ancient roots.

Being a practitioner of health I of course am drawn to the healing powers of the God’s. In ancient times entire temples were built where people would flock in dedication to be healed by the God’s of health. Even such greats as Hippocrates the father of Medicine adorned these temples.

On the 27th of March, the 147th day of  the new year one of such Gods is celebrated and Her name was Hygeia.


She was the Goddess of healing powers and medicine. The health bringer, the preserver of humanity from sickness and protecting all those from dangers on land and sea. This is where the very word hygiene was taken from. Along with Her father, Their temples were spruced along the Mediterranean helping those in need. Her father was Asclepius and her siblings were Goddesses also connected to health and well-being. Her symbol just like her father is the serpent. In ancient times the serpent was considered the healer sent from the God’s themselves. It was not until later that monotheistic religions turned the serpent into the villain.



Interestingly in medicine the serpent is still used as a symbol of medicine!


Hygeia’s bowl with the serpent used in pharmacology today.



Her Fathers Rod, The Rod of Asclepius used as a symbol of medicine today.

These Gods have been ingrained into the modern Orthodox Christians DNA, and as you can see above also into our western modern day life. Somehow throughout history clearly the people of the Pantheon were not willing to let go so easily and found ways to weave their God’s into their currant way of life. For instance if you are familiar with the Greek Greeting of Yiasou, or (Γειά σου) stin Igia sou, all that translates to is, “ To your Health or , Hygeia”, as the very Goddesses name now days actually still translates as health or hygiene. So Modern Greek Orthodox are still hailing to the Goddess Hygeia unawares, so much so they have Her in their greetings, in their departures and of course in salutations to their actual health. Western society revers these God’s enough to have them as their symbol.

I myself take great interest in observing the religions and cultures of the world. I not only observe and call upon my ancestral God’s but those that I connect with in my soul. Throughout history one God gets converted into the next, same God’s different names, cultures and times. There is no one more right or wrong, however it is important to recognize rather than deny. Denying and insisting that only you’re God or God’s exist is mere ignorance of the structure of creation. Recognize where our faith, our belief systems and our structures originated from.  Traveling the world you see time and time again the similarities of religious observations throughout all different cultures. Learning to embrace all of humanity together with your own religious path is true spirituality, this is the path of an enlightened healer for the self and others. As a witch, a healer, a sage, a shaman call it what you will you are the Earth keeper, the Keeper and guardian of all that is dear to Her. Respect all that she has granted to humanity, breath her in with utmost gratitude, she is your healer, your Hygeia or call her what you may, she who comes by many names and is still the same and the One.

Happy healing and Γειά σου!

Blessings to you and yours


Priestesses of the Bee: The Melissae

By Linda Iles
Isis, Lotus of Alexandria Lyceum
The Melissae, also known as The Thriae (also Thriai), a triad of divinatory Priestesses in ancient Greece, were originally Nymphs. The Thriae were able to see the future, interpret signs and omens provided by Nature and the Earth. They taught the God Apollo this art. Their names are Daphnis (Laurel), Kleodora (Famed for Her Gift) and Melaina (The Black).
“And not of every water do the Melissae carry to Deo, but of the trickling stream that springs from a holy fountain, pure and undefiled, the very crown of waters.”
– Callimachus, from his Hymn to Apollo
The Bee and the Great Mother
Ancient Greece and Crete

In the time of ancient Greece, and particularly in the temples of Artemis, Aphrodite, Demeter but also of Cybele, Diana and Rhea, priestesses were called the Melissae, which translates as ‘the bees.’  The Goddess as the Great Mother was sometimes titled Melissa, literally, ‘the Queen Bee.’ Some classical sources describe these priestesses as young and virgin, others tell us the designation of Melissae was a title of honor, bestowed due to devotion and labor for the Great Mother by a certain individual, which was above and beyond the ordinary.  The Pythian oracular priestess at Delphi was known as the Delphic Bee, and the emblem of a bee was placed on Delphic coins in her honor.  Bees sometimes appear on the statues of Artemis, and the officiates at Eleusis during the celebration of the Mysteries were called Bees.

Porphyry (AD 233 to c.304) writes: “The ancients gave the name of Melissae (bees) to the priestesses of Demeter who were initiates of the chthonian goddess; the name Melitodes to Kore herself: the moon (Artemis) too, whose province it was to bring to the birth, they called Melissa, because the moon being a bull and its ascension the bull, bees are begotten of bulls.  And souls that pass to the earth are bull-begotten.”

Archaeologist Marija Gimbutas (1921 – 1994) writes of this passage by Porphyry: “…we learn that Artemis is a bee, Melissa, and that both she and the bull belong to the moon.  Hence both are connected with the idea of a periodic regeneration.  We also learn that souls are bees and that Melissa draws souls down to be born.  The idea of a ‘life in death’ in this singularly interesting concept is expressed by the belief that the life of the bull passed into that of the bees.”

How did these titles of Melissa for the Great Mother and her priestesses as Melissae come about?  The Melissae may have inherited their title from an old order of nymphs – to this day the larva of bees are called nymphs! The myths of ancient Greece link the Melissae with the god Zeus and the island of Crete. Zeus was born in a cave of bees and was fed by them.  Another form of the myth says that Melisseus, king of Crete at that time, discoverer of honey and inventor of bee-keeping, had two daughters, Amalthaea and Melissa, who nourished the youthful Zeus with goat’s milk and honey.  Melissa was eventually appointed by her father as the first priestess of the Great Mother and from that time those who served the Great Mother were called Melissae.

The bee-keeping activities of the Minoans of Crete is documented not in myth but by many other ancient sources, including hieroglyphs, representations of actual beehives and engraved images.  The Greeks eventually took up bee-keeping due to the example set by the Minoans, and also presumably inherited the mythical image of the Great Mother Goddess as the Queen Bee. She was corresponded with regeneration, divinity, healing, purity and magic potency.  To the ancients, the honey bee was not only a messenger but a direct representative of the gods and goddesses of heaven and the airy realms.

In Old Europe

Marija Gimbutas included illustrations and photos of artifacts which depicted goddesses and bees in her book, “The Goddesses and Gods of Old Europe.”  Her detailed research provided ample evidence of a Bee Goddess and many examples of bee symbolism dating well back into the Neolithic period.  She believed that bees were held in high esteem by the Cretans from possibly as long ago as the beginning of the Neolithic period.

Eastern European languages, especially Hungarian, contain root words for mother, like ‘anya’ or ‘méh’which can be found in their words for bee, womb, uterus, to conceive, hive, bee sting, queen bee, cervix, fruit of the womb, apiary, embryo, bee swarm, fetus, and many more similar definitions.  In Lithuania, an ancient method of divination was performed by women who poured melted beeswax into cold, pure water.  Then they would interpret the fortune of the applicant through the resulting shapes taken on by the wax as it solidified.

The ability of bees to create honey was believed to be magical or divine – a kind of natural alchemy. The bee-keepers of Europe believed virtue was required for the production of honey, as bees would never produce unless the keeper was honest and good. It wasn’t until the late nineteenth century that scientists could explain how properties of flower pollen and the enzymes produced by bees could combine to make honey.  


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Gods and Goddesses of Healing

In many magical traditions, healing rituals are performed in tandem with a petition to the god or goddess of the pantheon who is representative of healing and wellness. If you or a loved one is ill or off-kilter, whether emotionally or physically or spiritually, you may want to investigate this list of deities. There are many, from a variety of cultures, who can be called upon in times of need for healing and wellness magic.

To read about the Gods and Goddesses please click on this link:

A Goddess for Every Need

A selection of divine figures from world religions, and how they can help you in your daily life.

The Goddess in her many forms is accessible to modern women for divine inspiration and guidance with all aspects of our lives. They can help increase finances and good fortune, bring love and success, enhance intuition, and ward off negativity. Most of the figures below are actively worshipped or considered goddesses in one tradition or another; and others, like Mary Magdalene, are revered as spiritual heroines or saints. Find out which divine female can help most as you learn to empower your self-esteem and spirituality and bring out the goddess in you!


Today is the Feast of Mary Magdalene

Now I know some of you reading this are wondering why I would announce a Catholic saint’s feast day on a pagan website. Wel for me and many others Mary Magdalene is not just a Catholic saint she is also the embodiment of a mother Goddess of love and acceptance that was incarnated many centuries ago and lives on along with all the other Mother Goddesses. SHe is right there with Isis, Mother Earth, Bridgit, and many others. I just got through attending a four-day online summit with some very knowledgeable women giving their insights to this wonderful lady. This is the last day of the summit but I believe you can still register to get access to all the material until next July. Here id=s the link for the summit: Mary Magdalene SUmmit

May love and peace be with you today and always my dear ones. Blessed be

Simple Basic Altar Set Up

When setting up an altar it is nice but not necessary to have a lot of magickal tools.

A basic altar can be set up using different colored tea lights or candles to represent the five elements, Spirit, Air, Fire, Water, and Earth. To make the candle burn a little longer and drip less keep them in your freezer until you are ready to use them. You can put your personal candle back into your freezer after it has cooled down for at one hour after use. Place your elemental candle in the shape of a pentagram. You can use a piece of chalk to draw the outline of a pentagram wherever you are setting up your altar. When you are done with the circle and have removed all things off wherever your atar was set up just use a wet paper towel to wipe off the chalk. It may take more than one depending on how hard use pressed with the chalk when drawing the pentagram. When I to this I either bury the paper towel in one of my gardens or burn it in my outdoor fireplace as a sign of respect for the remains of the pentagram it holds.

A few other ideas  to use for the elements are:

SPIRIT: A statue or picture of an angel or a picture of ancestor

AIR: A feather or incense stick or cone or windchimes

FIRE: A book of matches or lighter or wooden matches

WATER: A seashell or any type of aquatic wildlife statue or picture or a small container of water

EARTH: A stick or some rocks or a small container of dirt or salt (not sea salt but regular table salt)

The Goddess and God you wish to have present can also be done by using a candle or tea light. Some other objects you could use are:

GODDESS: Eggshell or birds nest or a statute of a woman of any size or a picture of a Goddess

GODS: A pine cone or small tree branch with leaves or a statute of a man any size or a picture of a God

You can take a glass r cup and a small plate of some kind from your kitchen that you rarely use to consecrate for use as your chalice and offering dish.

Your personal candle you will want to use a bigger candle so you do not have to dedicate and personalize one every time you use it in a circle. I have a 12-inch (30.48 cm) taper candle works very well for my personal candle and lasts about 2 to 4 months depending on how often I make a circle.

As for your Book of Shadows being on your altar or not is up to you. I keep a couple of pieces of paper and a pen on my altar when doing a circle, especially if it is a circle meditation, just in case something happens during the circle I want to remember. My BOS is a three-ring binder with lots of empty pages in it so I do not have to cleanse them before using them on my altar or placing them back into my BOS.

WAND: Your do not absolutely have to have a wand to do a basic altar. But if you live near a park, forest or have trees in your yard look on the ground for a fallen branch. Ask the tree if you can have it for your personal use as a wand and leave a small token of appreciation such as a little water, a small stone or whatever else you feel might be appropriate.

SIDE NOTE: Left handed people sometimes put their Personal Candle on the left and BOS on the right.

Copyright 2017 Lady Beltane.

Types of Pagan Deities

Many Pagan deities are associated with various aspects of the human experience – love, death, marriage, fertility, and so forth. Still others are connected to different phases of the agricultural cycle, the moon, and the sun. Here is an index of the various gods and goddesses that we discuss here at About Pagan/Wiccan, with links to more detailed information contained within.

How Do I Know if a Deity Is Calling Me?

Question: How Do I Know if a Deity Is Calling Me?

A reader writes in, “There’s been some weird stuff going on in my life, and I’m beginning to notice things happening that make me think a god or goddess is trying to contact me. How do I know that this is the case and that it’s not just my brain making things up?


Typically, when someone is “tapped” by a god or goddess, there is a series of messages, rather than a single isolated incident.

Many of these messages are symbolic in nature, rather than actual “Hey! I’m Athena! Lookit, me!” kind of things.

As an example, you might have a dream or vision in which you are approached by a human figure who has something different about them. You’ll probably know it’s a deity, but they are sometimes evasive when it comes to telling you who they are — so you could do some research, and figure out who it was based upon appearance and characteristics.

In addition to a vision, you might have an experience in which symbols of this god or goddess appear randomly in your…

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HEKATE (or Hecate)

HEKATE (Hecate) was the goddess of magic, witchcraft, the night, moon, ghosts and necromancy. She was the only child of the Titanes Perses and Asteria from whom she received her power over heaven, earth, and sea.

Hekate assisted Demeter in her search for Persephone, guiding her through the night with flaming torches. After the mother-daughter reunion became she Persephone’s minister and companion in Haides.

Three metamorphosis myths describe the origins of her animal familiars: the black she-dog and the polecat (a mustelid house pet kept by the ancients to hunt vermin). The dog was the Trojan Queen Hekabe (Hecuba) who leapt into the sea after the fall of Troy and was transformed by the goddess. The polecat was either the witch Gale, turned as punishment for her incontinence, or Galinthias, midwife of Alkmene (Alcmena), who was transformed by the enraged goddess Eileithyia but adopted by the sympathetic Hekate.

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13 Things You Don’t Need to Know About the Triple Goddess (but are kind of interesting) by John Halstead

1. Gerald Gardner did not worship the Triple Goddess. Gerald Gardner, the father of Wicca, did not mention a Triple Goddess in his “Book of Shadows”.  Nor does Gardner mention a Triple Goddess in Witchcraft Today, which was published in 1954.  He does mention a Triple Goddess in his book, The Meaning of Witchcraft, published in 1959, but only briefly.  Similarly, Raymond Buckland, who is credited with bringing Gardnerian witchcraft to America does not mention the Triple Goddess in Witchcraft from the Inside (1971) or his book, Tree: The Complete Book of Saxon Witchcraft (1974). The Triple Goddess is mentioned only briefly in his best-selling Buckland’s Complete Book of Witchcraft (1986), published twelve years later, and with no exposition.

2.  Gerald Gardner visited Robert Graves.  In 1961, Idries Shah brought Gardner to visit Graves at his home on the island of Majorca.  (Fred Adams, the founder of Feraferia, also visited Graves in 1959.)  Gardner did write an essay about the Triple Goddess entitled “The Triad of the Goddess”.  (I am grateful to Morgan Davis of for drawing my attention to this essay.  I’ll be glad to email a .pdf of the document to anyone who requests or you can download it here.)  The essay was found among Gardner’s papers which were purchased by Ripley’s from Gardner’s Witchcraft Museum.  Unfortunately, the essay is undated.  (I have seen someone else give it a date of 1958, but in any case, it appears to have been written after Gardner read Graves.)  In the essay, Gardner describes the “triad of the Goddess” as “LOVE:DEATH:REBIRTH” and compares it to the Christian Trinity and to the triad of “Vrahmin, Vishnu and Siva”.  Gardner argues that the death aspect is misinterpreted as a “Hag aspect” (here he seems to be responding to Graves), and that the true death aspect is not frightening, but comforting.  This is consistent with Gardner’s conception of the Goddess as “light” and the God as “dark”.

3.  Robert Graves wrote about the Triple Goddess before he wrote The White Goddess.  Many Pagans will know that Robert Graves described the Triple Goddess in his book The White Goddess, published in 1948.  But four years earlier, in Hercules, My Shipmate, or The Golden Fleece, which describes the ascendancy of the Olympian gods over the Triple Goddess, he described the Goddess as Maiden, Nymph and Mother, corresponding to the New Moon, Full Moon, and Old Moon.  Then, in 1946, Graves published King Jesus, where he described a Great Triple Moon Goddess of birth, love, and death.  In the narrative, the Triple Goddess takes the form of Miriam (Jesus’ mother), Mary of Cleopas (Jesus’ potential wife), and Mary Magdalene (a witch who is a disciple of the old goddess religion).

4.  The Triple Goddess was not always Maiden-Mother-Crone…

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