Gods and Goddesses of Healing

In many magical traditions, healing rituals are performed in tandem with a petition to the god or goddess of the pantheon who is representative of healing and wellness. If you or a loved one is ill or off-kilter, whether emotionally or physically or spiritually, you may want to investigate this list of deities. There are many, from a variety of cultures, who can be called upon in times of need for healing and wellness magic.

To read about the Gods and Goddesses please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/gods-and-goddesses-of-healing-2561980

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A Goddess for Every Need

A selection of divine figures from world religions, and how they can help you in your daily life.

The Goddess in her many forms is accessible to modern women for divine inspiration and guidance with all aspects of our lives. They can help increase finances and good fortune, bring love and success, enhance intuition, and ward off negativity. Most of the figures below are actively worshipped or considered goddesses in one tradition or another; and others, like Mary Magdalene, are revered as spiritual heroines or saints. Find out which divine female can help most as you learn to empower your self-esteem and spirituality and bring out the goddess in you!

Read more at http://www.beliefnet.com/wellness/2003/10/a-goddess-for-every-need.aspx#dlmH8uaWx5jd8deK.99
Read more at http://www.beliefnet.com/wellness/2003/10/a-goddess-for-every-need.aspx#dlmH8uaWx5jd8deK.99

Today is the Feast of Mary Magdalene

Now I know some of you reading this are wondering why I would announce a Catholic saint’s feast day on a pagan website. Wel for me and many others Mary Magdalene is not just a Catholic saint she is also the embodiment of a mother Goddess of love and acceptance that was incarnated many centuries ago and lives on along with all the other Mother Goddesses. SHe is right there with Isis, Mother Earth, Bridgit, and many others. I just got through attending a four-day online summit with some very knowledgeable women giving their insights to this wonderful lady. This is the last day of the summit but I believe you can still register to get access to all the material until next July. Here id=s the link for the summit: Mary Magdalene SUmmit

May love and peace be with you today and always my dear ones. Blessed be

Simple Basic Altar Set Up

When setting up an altar it is nice but not necessary to have a lot of magickal tools.

A basic altar can be set up using different colored tea lights or candles to represent the five elements, Spirit, Air, Fire, Water, and Earth. To make the candle burn a little longer and drip less keep them in your freezer until you are ready to use them. You can put your personal candle back into your freezer after it has cooled down for at one hour after use. Place your elemental candle in the shape of a pentagram. You can use a piece of chalk to draw the outline of a pentagram wherever you are setting up your altar. When you are done with the circle and have removed all things off wherever your atar was set up just use a wet paper towel to wipe off the chalk. It may take more than one depending on how hard use pressed with the chalk when drawing the pentagram. When I to this I either bury the paper towel in one of my gardens or burn it in my outdoor fireplace as a sign of respect for the remains of the pentagram it holds.

A few other ideas  to use for the elements are:

SPIRIT: A statue or picture of an angel or a picture of ancestor

AIR: A feather or incense stick or cone or windchimes

FIRE: A book of matches or lighter or wooden matches

WATER: A seashell or any type of aquatic wildlife statue or picture or a small container of water

EARTH: A stick or some rocks or a small container of dirt or salt (not sea salt but regular table salt)

The Goddess and God you wish to have present can also be done by using a candle or tea light. Some other objects you could use are:

GODDESS: Eggshell or birds nest or a statute of a woman of any size or a picture of a Goddess

GODS: A pine cone or small tree branch with leaves or a statute of a man any size or a picture of a God

You can take a glass r cup and a small plate of some kind from your kitchen that you rarely use to consecrate for use as your chalice and offering dish.

Your personal candle you will want to use a bigger candle so you do not have to dedicate and personalize one every time you use it in a circle. I have a 12-inch (30.48 cm) taper candle works very well for my personal candle and lasts about 2 to 4 months depending on how often I make a circle.

As for your Book of Shadows being on your altar or not is up to you. I keep a couple of pieces of paper and a pen on my altar when doing a circle, especially if it is a circle meditation, just in case something happens during the circle I want to remember. My BOS is a three-ring binder with lots of empty pages in it so I do not have to cleanse them before using them on my altar or placing them back into my BOS.

WAND: Your do not absolutely have to have a wand to do a basic altar. But if you live near a park, forest or have trees in your yard look on the ground for a fallen branch. Ask the tree if you can have it for your personal use as a wand and leave a small token of appreciation such as a little water, a small stone or whatever else you feel might be appropriate.

SIDE NOTE: Left handed people sometimes put their Personal Candle on the left and BOS on the right.

Copyright 2017 Lady Beltane.

Types of Pagan Deities

Many Pagan deities are associated with various aspects of the human experience – love, death, marriage, fertility, and so forth. Still others are connected to different phases of the agricultural cycle, the moon, and the sun. Here is an index of the various gods and goddesses that we discuss here at About Pagan/Wiccan, with links to more detailed information contained within.

How Do I Know if a Deity Is Calling Me?

Question: How Do I Know if a Deity Is Calling Me?

A reader writes in, “There’s been some weird stuff going on in my life, and I’m beginning to notice things happening that make me think a god or goddess is trying to contact me. How do I know that this is the case and that it’s not just my brain making things up?

Answer:

Typically, when someone is “tapped” by a god or goddess, there is a series of messages, rather than a single isolated incident.

Many of these messages are symbolic in nature, rather than actual “Hey! I’m Athena! Lookit, me!” kind of things.

As an example, you might have a dream or vision in which you are approached by a human figure who has something different about them. You’ll probably know it’s a deity, but they are sometimes evasive when it comes to telling you who they are — so you could do some research, and figure out who it was based upon appearance and characteristics.

In addition to a vision, you might have an experience in which symbols of this god or goddess appear randomly in your…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/how-do-i-know-if-a-deity-is-calling-me-2561952?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170321&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

HEKATE (or Hecate)

HEKATE (Hecate) was the goddess of magic, witchcraft, the night, moon, ghosts and necromancy. She was the only child of the Titanes Perses and Asteria from whom she received her power over heaven, earth, and sea.

Hekate assisted Demeter in her search for Persephone, guiding her through the night with flaming torches. After the mother-daughter reunion became she Persephone’s minister and companion in Haides.

Three metamorphosis myths describe the origins of her animal familiars: the black she-dog and the polecat (a mustelid house pet kept by the ancients to hunt vermin). The dog was the Trojan Queen Hekabe (Hecuba) who leapt into the sea after the fall of Troy and was transformed by the goddess. The polecat was either the witch Gale, turned as punishment for her incontinence, or Galinthias, midwife of Alkmene (Alcmena), who was transformed by the enraged goddess Eileithyia but adopted by the sympathetic Hekate.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: http://www.theoi.com/Khthonios/Hekate.html

13 Things You Don’t Need to Know About the Triple Goddess (but are kind of interesting) by John Halstead

1. Gerald Gardner did not worship the Triple Goddess. Gerald Gardner, the father of Wicca, did not mention a Triple Goddess in his “Book of Shadows”.  Nor does Gardner mention a Triple Goddess in Witchcraft Today, which was published in 1954.  He does mention a Triple Goddess in his book, The Meaning of Witchcraft, published in 1959, but only briefly.  Similarly, Raymond Buckland, who is credited with bringing Gardnerian witchcraft to America does not mention the Triple Goddess in Witchcraft from the Inside (1971) or his book, Tree: The Complete Book of Saxon Witchcraft (1974). The Triple Goddess is mentioned only briefly in his best-selling Buckland’s Complete Book of Witchcraft (1986), published twelve years later, and with no exposition.

2.  Gerald Gardner visited Robert Graves.  In 1961, Idries Shah brought Gardner to visit Graves at his home on the island of Majorca.  (Fred Adams, the founder of Feraferia, also visited Graves in 1959.)  Gardner did write an essay about the Triple Goddess entitled “The Triad of the Goddess”.  (I am grateful to Morgan Davis of geraldgardner.com for drawing my attention to this essay.  I’ll be glad to email a .pdf of the document to anyone who requests or you can download it here.)  The essay was found among Gardner’s papers which were purchased by Ripley’s from Gardner’s Witchcraft Museum.  Unfortunately, the essay is undated.  (I have seen someone else give it a date of 1958, but in any case, it appears to have been written after Gardner read Graves.)  In the essay, Gardner describes the “triad of the Goddess” as “LOVE:DEATH:REBIRTH” and compares it to the Christian Trinity and to the triad of “Vrahmin, Vishnu and Siva”.  Gardner argues that the death aspect is misinterpreted as a “Hag aspect” (here he seems to be responding to Graves), and that the true death aspect is not frightening, but comforting.  This is consistent with Gardner’s conception of the Goddess as “light” and the God as “dark”.

3.  Robert Graves wrote about the Triple Goddess before he wrote The White Goddess.  Many Pagans will know that Robert Graves described the Triple Goddess in his book The White Goddess, published in 1948.  But four years earlier, in Hercules, My Shipmate, or The Golden Fleece, which describes the ascendancy of the Olympian gods over the Triple Goddess, he described the Goddess as Maiden, Nymph and Mother, corresponding to the New Moon, Full Moon, and Old Moon.  Then, in 1946, Graves published King Jesus, where he described a Great Triple Moon Goddess of birth, love, and death.  In the narrative, the Triple Goddess takes the form of Miriam (Jesus’ mother), Mary of Cleopas (Jesus’ potential wife), and Mary Magdalene (a witch who is a disciple of the old goddess religion).

4.  The Triple Goddess was not always Maiden-Mother-Crone…

To read the rest of this article please click on or copy and paste this link into your browser: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/allergicpagan/2014/11/19/13-things-you-dont-need-to-know-about-the-triple-goddess-but-are-kind-of-interesting/

The Triple Goddess The Original Holy Trinity

The Triple Goddess is a term first popularised by the poet and scholar Robert Graves in the 20th century. He depicted the triplicity as Maiden, Mother and Crone and many neo-pagans have followed this imagery. While some scholars attributed the idea to the lively imagination of the poet, recent archaeology has made it abundantly clear that “Goddess Triplicities” are to be found throughout ancient Europe.

In Hinduism today, the triplicity of the Goddess in Shakta worship is of cardinal importance, and outside the Indo-European world the Triple Goddess is found in Africa and Asia.

How should the devotee of Our Mother God understand this universal image?

While many of us contemplate the single image of Our Mother, there has always been an important Trinitarian aspect to Her worship. Ironically the great Christian theologian, St. Augustine, mocked the pagans for their belief that the Triple Goddess could be One and also Three. After his conversion he found himself defending the masculinised version of the same doctrine!

There are, as usual, various patriarchal stumbling-blocks to avoid. The most prominent is the attempt to assimilate all three aspects of Dea to the moon. This, of course, comes from the early patriarchal phenomenon that archaeologists call “solarisation” – the process of re-assigning the higher (Solar and Celestial) symbolism to the masculine image and leaving the feminine with the lower (Lunar and Earthly) aspects.

Actually, the lunar aspect of the Trinity is the Daughter, and the contrast between the Solar Mother and Lunar Daughter is one of the beautiful and powerful aspects of Trinitarian Déanism.

The Thealogy of the Triple Goddess…

To read the rest of this article please click on or copy and paste this or into your browser:   http://www.mother-god.com/triple-goddess.html

Who Are the Wiccan Horned God and Triple Goddess?

By Mackenzie Sage Wright – A Wiccan of 25 years, Sage likes to put her background as a writer and teacher to use by helping people learn about this NeoPagan path

The Horned God and Triple Goddess are generally the deities you’ll hear people associate with Wicca, but these very same concepts generate a lot of confusion. You’ll read a lot of books that will tell you the Horned God is like this, or the Triple Goddess is like that. There are a lot of oversimplifications and generalizations going on with these descriptions. Many Wiccan sources also refer to the Lord and Lady as well, or “The” God, and “The” Goddess (the article “the” implying they’re specific deities). This leaves people to wonder— to whom, exactly, are we referring when we use these terms?

Wicca, being a 20th century religion, is fairly unique in one way: we don’t actually have our own deities. That is, our religion wasn’t built around veneration of any specific deities of our own—we worship Pagan Gods and Goddesses of other ancient cultures in a new and modern world. We do not have our own unique pantheon, nor do we believe our religion was revealed to us by deities.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link or copy and paste this link into your browser: https://exemplore.com/wicca-witchcraft/Wicca-for-Beginners-Who-Is-the-Horned-God-and-the-Triple-Goddess