Week 16 – Goddess Knowledge – Thetis

They is is a Greek sea goddess who represents fertility. She is a creator goddess, for all life begins in the sea, and she is usually portrayed as a Nereid (sea nymph): a beautiful, young semidivine goddess fond of dancing and singing. She helped raise the artisan God Heparstus and once provided sanctuary for Dionysus. Theroux is particularly known as a shape-shictrr: when Peleus desired to marry her, she transformed herself into fire, water, lion, and a serpent in order to escape him. As the personification of calm waters, They is is responsible for providing a peaceful sea. She is that center of peace and calm that is always available, even in the most of changing forms. She is a goddess who enjoys life’s pleasures.

For more information on They is please use this link: https://www.google.com/search?q=greek+goddess+thetis&oq=greek+goddess+thetis&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l3.15505j0j7&client=tablet-android-verizon&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8

For images of They is please use this link: https://www.google.com/search?q=greek+goddess+thetis&client=tablet-android-verizon&prmd=isnv&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi53YWcrcPhAhWFyIMKHfG1A5kQ_AUoAXoECAwQAQ&biw=683&bih=911

Week 15 – Goddess Knowledge Card – Themis

Themis is one of the oldest and most revered of the Greek goddesses. The daughter of Gaia, the earth goddess, Themis is the mother of the three Fates, who determine the destiny of all mortals and gods. Shown here as the giver of dreams, she once was consulted at Delphi as the bestowed of Oracle’s. Themis is prophecy incarnate: her Oracle’s derive from hervehicle sense of order and connection to nature. In later Greek mythology, transferred to Mount Olympus, she personified the social order of law and custom, a reminder that social order is ultimately dependent on the natural order of the earth. Themis is a grounded, earthly goddess who is also comfortable moving through the shifting, romantic world of dreams. She is deep wisdom familiar with both the depths of earth and the heights of sky: a guide into soul.

I picked the keywords Greek Goddess Themis Facts, there are other keys words you could use such as story or history or of justice or power.

More Information About Greek Goddess Themis

Images of Goddess Themis

The Myth Of Hades And Persephone

The myth of Hades and Persephone is one of the well known Greek myths.

Hades was the brother of Zeus and the god of the underworld.

Persephone was the daughter of Demeter, the Goddess of nature.

The myth of Hades and Persephone is one more myth of love and abduction in the Greek mythology.

Hades And Persephone: The Beginning Of The Myth

Hades fell in love with Persephone and decided to kidnap her. The myth says that in one of the rare times he left the Underworld, he traveled above ground to pursue her, while she was gathering flowers in a field.

One day Hades, God of the Underworld, saw Persephone and instantly fell in love with her.

To read the rest of this version and other mythology connected to Hades and Persephone please click on this link: 1 View on the Mythologies of Hades and Persephone

To read other interpretations of the tale please click on this link that will take you to a general search: More Views on Persephone and Hades Mythology

More Information About Hades

Images of Hades

More Information about Demeter

Images of Demeter

Week 14 – Goddess Knowledge – Persephone

(This week I went through the deck to find this Goddess’ card because she is very important to why we have the warmer weather and a time when plants, flowers, trees, etc have time to grow into abundance for our food and herbs for magickal and medicinal needs. She is also important to why we have colder months when nothing will grow outdoors. This goddess is part of an ancient Greek tale that includes her mother, Demeter, and the god of the Underworld Hades. I will write posts with more information on Demeter and Hades which will follow after what the “Goddess Knowledge Card” has to say about Persephone.)

PERSEPHONE

Although Persephone is best known as Demeter’s daughter, the maiden who was abducted by Hades, lord of the underworld, the Greek version of her reflects the usurpation of female mysteries by a patriarchal mythology. In this version Persephone personifies the kore, the maiden aspect of the goddess. Her myth exemplifies the cycles of nature, for when Persephone is underground, plants do not bloom, and when she returns to earth, spring ensues.

Persephone is the goddess of the soul, for it is in the darkness of the underworld (analogous to the unconscious) that the soul is formed. In the Orphic mysteries, Persephone granted wisdom to the initiate, for she is the goddess of a dark, uncomfortable wisdom, a goddess of dark and frightening power. Persephone represents the ability to rule over the aspects of ourselves that are terrifying in the extreme.

More Information About Persephone

Images of Persephone

The Eleusinian Mysteries: An Unresolved Ancient Greek Puzzle

To this day the Eleusinian mysteries remains a subject enveloped by broken pieces of information, creating great controversy among historians who work under heavy assumptions while trying to puzzle out this ancient tradition. Complete details involving the rites and celebrations which took place during the mysteries were marked by a sworn oath of secrecy by the initiated and, therefore, vanished from our knowledge. In that respect, what do we know about the mysteries and what are the speculations involving it? Although modern Historians still argue about different aspects regarding this mystic ritual, some ideas are often accepted among them, which are understood by the testimonials of the initiated.

In Ancient Greece, the town of Eleusis, situated west of Athens, became the most important religious center of the pagan world during its time. According to the old belief and relates in the Homeric Hymn, Demeter (goddess of agriculture) stopped to rest at Eleusis during her quest for her daughter, Persephone, who was kidnaped by Hades. There, Demeter ordered a temple and altar to be built in her honor. After the joyful reunion of the goddess with the missing Persephone, she instructed the leaders of Eleusis in how to perform her rites. The cult, then, is believed to have been taught directly by Demeter herself.

To read the rest of this article copy and paste this link into your browser: https://www.ancient-origins.net/history/eleusinian-mysteries-unresolved-ancient-greek-puzzle-006903

Drawing down the Moon 

 

δραςινγ-δοςν-τηε-μοον

Drawing down the Moon (also known as drawing down the Goddess) is a central ritualin many contemporary Wiccan traditions. During the ritual, a coven’s High Priestessenters a trance and requests that the Goddessor Triple Goddess, symbolized by the Moon, enter her body and speak through her. The High Priestess may be aided by the High Priest, who invokes the spirit of the Goddess. During her trance, the Goddess speaks through the High Priestess.

The name most likely comes from a depiction of two women and the moon on an ancient Greek vase, believed to date from the second century BCE.

In classical times of ancient Greece, ancient Thessalian witches were believed to control the moon, according to the tract: “If I command the moon, it will come down; and if I wish to withhold the day, night will linger over my head; and again, if I wish to embark on the sea, I need no ship, and if I wish to fly through the air, I am free from my weight.”

To continue reading….

The Orphic hymn to Selene (Moon)

One of these songs is the Orphic Hymn to the goddess Selene, namely the Moon. The text could be also considered as a spell one could address to the Blood Moon that is going to appear in the skies tomorrow.

“Hear, Goddess queen, diffusing silver light, bull-horn’d and wand’ring thro’ the gloom of Night.

With stars surrounded, and with circuit wide Night’s torch extending, thro’ the heav’ns you ride:

Female and Male with borrow’d rays you shine, and now full-orb’d, now tending to decline.

Mother of ages, fruit-producing Moon [Mene], whose amber orb makes Night’s reflected noon:

Lover of horses, splendid, queen of Night, all-seeing pow’r bedeck’d with starry light.

Lover of vigilance, the foe of strife, in peace rejoicing, and a prudent life:

Fair lamp of Night, its ornament and friend, who giv’st to Nature’s works their destin’d end.

Queen of the stars, all-wife Diana hail! Deck’d with a graceful robe and shining veil;

Come, blessed Goddess, prudent, starry, bright, come moony-lamp with chaste and splendid light,

Shine on these sacred rites with prosp’rous rays, and pleas’d accept thy suppliant’s mystic praise.”

Hear, Goddess queen, diffusing silver light, bull-horn’d and wand’ring thro’ the gloom of Night.

With stars surrounded, and with circuit wide Night’s torch extending, thro’ the heav’ns you ride:

Female and Male with borrow’d rays you shine, and now full-orb’d, now tending to decline.

Mother of ages, fruit-producing Moon [Mene], whose amber orb makes Night’s reflected noon:

Lover of horses, splendid, queen of Night, all-seeing pow’r bedeck’d with starry light.

Lover of vigilance, the foe of strife, in peace rejoicing, and a prudent life:

Fair lamp of Night, its ornament and friend, who giv’st to Nature’s works their destin’d end.

Queen of the stars, all-wife Diana hail! Deck’d with a graceful robe and shining veil;

Come, blessed Goddess, prudent, starry, bright, come moony-lamp with chaste and splendid light,

Shine on these sacred rites with prosp’rous rays, and pleas’d accept thy suppliant’s mystic praise.

To continue reading…..

 

Week 2- Goddess Knowledge Medusa

When Medusa was slain, the winged horse Pegasus sprang from her blood. The Greeks pottery Medusa as a horrifying gorgon, an ugly woman with snakes for hair; anyone who looked at her face was turned to stone. Yet her name has the same root as medicine and measure, and derives from a Greek word meaning “to protect, to rule over.” Medusa is a moon goddess, the triple-headed Great Goddess in her death aspect. She is associated with blood, so to meet her is to meet the mysteries of moon-blood or menstrual blood, sacred and terrible, in many mythologies the source of life. Medusa is serpent energy, enlivening, terrifying, impersonal. Somehow Medusa, a symbol of growth and generation that dies so that from death may come life, became a symbol of fear, for to look directly upon the divine is to face a terrifying reality.

Pegasus is instinct, wisdom, imagination, life force, and intuitive understanding.

For more information about the Goddess Medusa here is the link for a general search: Information about Medusa

To see images of Medusa please use this general search link: Images of Medusa

When Artemis Aims, When Artemis Calls

Artemis was the first goddess to call to me. She was between the branches and in the shuffle of leaves. And she called to me to a lake in British Columbia.

She called me in story and song and clear night sky.

Artemis inspired me during a Reclaiming Witchcamp in 2015. And I saw Orion in the space above my house before I left to join the group of teachers.

To join the witches.

To join the space between and beyond time.

To join the hunt for our hearts.

To continue reading… .

 

Magical Protection and Uncrossing Rituals: When You Need It, How To Do It

If you’ve been following the last two blog posts, I’ve been covering how to determine whether or not you’re dealing with any hexes/curses/psychic attacks against yourself, and best practices for both psychic and magical hygiene. Now it’s time to cover “how to protect yourself 101”.

First of all, the two best books I’ve found on this topic are by Jason Miller, which is Protection and Reversal Magick. The second is Magickal Protection by Damon Brand. Both are super useful and will go into this topic in far greater detail than I possibly could in a single blog post.

To continue reading..  .

Magic in Ancient Greece: Necromancy, Curses, Love Spells, and Oracles

The magical traditions of ancient Greece encompassed spells, curse tablets, drugs, potions, poisons, amulets, and talismans. For many cultures of the past, there was a very fine line between magic, superstition, religion, and science. The ancient magicians were seen as symbols of wisdom, keepers of secrets, and masters of the arts, mathematics and science, particularly chemistry. Because magicians were believed to be individuals with access to supernatural powers, they were both feared and respected.

Spells and incantations had been used by the Egyptians for thousands of years and the Greeks carried this tradition forward, as evidenced by surviving Greek papyri containing magic records that date back to the 4th and 3rd century BC.

To read the rest of this article please copy and paste this link into your browser: https://www.ancient-origins.net/history-ancient-traditions/magic-ancient-greece-necromancy-curses-love-spells-and-oracles-007348/page/0/1