Magic in Ancient Greece: Necromancy, Curses, Love Spells, and Oracles

The magical traditions of ancient Greece encompassed spells, curse tablets, drugs, potions, poisons, amulets, and talismans. For many cultures of the past, there was a very fine line between magic, superstition, religion, and science. The ancient magicians were seen as symbols of wisdom, keepers of secrets, and masters of the arts, mathematics and science, particularly chemistry. Because magicians were believed to be individuals with access to supernatural powers, they were both feared and respected.

Spells and incantations had been used by the Egyptians for thousands of years and the Greeks carried this tradition forward, as evidenced by surviving Greek papyri containing magic records that date back to the 4th and 3rd century BC.

To read the rest of this article please copy and paste this link into your browser: https://www.ancient-origins.net/history-ancient-traditions/magic-ancient-greece-necromancy-curses-love-spells-and-oracles-007348/page/0/1

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General Information and Images of the Greek/Roman Healing God Asclepius/Aesculapius

Here is the link to see images of Asclepius

Here is the link to see images of Aesculapius

Here is the link for a general search on the Greek/Roman healing god Asclepius/Aesculapius

Asclepius GRECO-ROMAN GOD

Alternative Titles: Aesculapius, Asklepios
Asclepius, Greek Asklepios, Latin Aesculapius, Greco-Roman god of medicine, son of Apollo (god of healing, truth, and prophecy) and the mortal princess Coronis. The Centaur Chiron taught him the art of healing. At length Zeus (the king of the gods), afraid that Asclepius might render all men immortal, slew him with a thunderbolt. Apollo slew the Cyclopes who had made the thunderbolt and was then forced by Zeus to serve Admetus.

Homer, in the Iliad, mentions him only as a skillful physician and the father of two Greek doctors at Troy, Machaon and Podalirius; in later times, however, he was honoured as a hero and eventually worshiped as a god. The cult began in Thessaly but spread to many parts of Greece. Because it was supposed that Asclepius effected cures of the sick in dreams, the practice of sleeping in his temples in Epidaurus in South Greece became common. In 293 BC his cult spread to Rome, where he was worshiped as Aesculapius

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Asklepios/Aesculapius – Greek/Roman God of Healing

Greek Name Ασκληπιος, Transliteration Asklêpios, Asclepius, Roman Name Aesculapius, Translation To Cut Open

To Cut Open

Asclepius, Greco-Roman marble statue C1st-2nd A.D., State Hermitage Museum

ASKLEPIOS (Asclepius) was the god of medicine. He was also the patron god, and reputed ancestor, of the Asklepiades (Asclepiades), the ancient guild of doctors.

Asklepios was the son of Apollon and the Trikkaian (Triccaean) princess Koronis (Coronis). His mother died in labour and when she was laid out on the pyre, Apollon cut the unborn child from her womb. From this Asklepios received his name which means “to cut open.” Asklepios was raised by the centaur Kheiron (Chiron) who instructed him in the art of medicine. He grew so skilled in the craft that he was able to restore the dead to life. This was a crime against the natural order and so Zeus destroyed him with a thunderbolt

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Agathos Daimon

Agathos Daimon means “good spirit” and is a religious observance held on the second day of each lunar month, immediately following the Noumenia.  It is the third celebration of a trio of household monthly observances.  A good spirit usually refers to a type of divine being that is less powerful than a God, is personal to each family, and can bring the family good luck, protection, or some type of assistance.  Household spirits are usually seen as either snakes or a s a young man with a horn of plenty in hand.  

I celebrate the Agathos Diamon by pouring a libation to the spirit and asking for his continued blessings on our family.  If there is something in particular that our family wishes help with, I may give an additional offering to our family’s protective spirit.  Although I know I can always approach the Gods directly, the Agathoi Diamones are seen to be helpful intermediaries between the Gods and man.  

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Hekate and August: Celebrating The Harvest, Storms, Witchcraft, Keys, and Children

There is a multitude of Hekatean celebrations during August. We can celebrate her connections with the harvest, witches, storms, keys, and children during this month. Here’s a summary of each of them with suggestions for practices and rituals. 

To continue reading…..

 

The Witches of Thessaly

By Hypatia

Written for Coven Life

4th June 2018

 

Thessaly was a region in antiquity that was mentioned in Homers Odyssey. There he described the already infamous witches of Thessaly that were active from the 1st to the 3rd Century BCE. Before him both Plato and Socrates spoke of them. These women were both feared and revered.

So who were the Thessalian Witches?

In the centre of it all was the Goddess Hecate. Servants and priestesses of Hecate were already famous for their witchcraft. Thessaly was located in the northern region of Greece that bordered Macedonia. It was considered to be the home of witchcraft and magic, a place where the first known historical Witch-Cult was recorded.

The Thessalian Witches had incredible Magickal abilities, sayings, prayers and incantations mentioned in Homers Odyssey that are still till this day used by modern practitioners of Magick to draw down the moon.

“If I command the Moon it will come down: and if I wish to withhold the day, night will linger over my head: and again, if I wish to embark on the sea, I need no ship, and if I wish to fly through the air, I am free from my weight”.

Wow, it looks like witches have been flying through the air since the 2nd century BC according to this extract from a Greek text.

The red headed women of Thessaly would use the magical powers of the moon. The Magickal concept of the moon was that it had the ability to perspire Magickal sweat, which in the hand of a witch revealed truly wondrous powers. There was a Magick called virus lunare, through which the moon could be invoked and a liquid secreted from it and then dropped on the herbs. This was the ambrosia that was acquired during the waxing period of the moon and was part of some of the most famous potions ever created throughout history.

The Thessalian Witches were mainly women, however there is also indication of male members as well.

These servants and priestesses of the Goddess were attributed for their all-powerful Love Potions and their aphrodisiacs, ones that rarely come without consequence. Some of these preparations could “make someone crazy” and even impotent, so as legend has it .

Some of the less desirable traits of the Witches of Thessaly included, cannibalism and traits of scatological nature. I can see similarities where the trickling down of descriptive and I believe deceptive characteristics that were adopted for the persecution of witches in European “Christendom” held steadfast from the ancient times.

One of the famous Witches of Thessaly included Aglaonike, a natural philosopher in c 200 BC. She was a master of the arts predicting Lunar cycles that included lunar eclipses. Armed with this knowledge, she was able to, what others believed to control the moon. This power gained her both respect and fear from not only the everyday person but heads of state and country. Now that’s wisdom in all it’s glory!! It’s no wonder these women and men were so feared.

Throughout history the Witches of Thessaly have endured much literary criticism that was written from a range of perspectives, interpretations and even theoretical structures. Either way their stories that were once fact adorning the temples of Hecate, soon became history, then legend and finally mythology. The Priestesses and servants of the Great Goddess have left us with their incredible legacy, one that till this day connects the feminine aspect of humanity with the moon and spans globally throughout generations. Take what you may from the historical interpretations and stories of the Thessalian Witches, they were and are legendary. They were Priestesses and servants of the Great Goddess, a Goddess that was venerated and worshiped throughout the world in many different aspects . Remnants of their legacy is evident in our modern understanding of the historical concepts of earth based religions. Ones that are clearly still needed and yearned from humanity till this day.

Magic in Ancient Greece: Necromancy, Curses, Love Spells, and Oracles

The

magical traditions of ancient Greece encompassed spells, curse tablets, drugs, potions, poisons, amulets, and talismans. For many cultures of the past, there was a very fine line between magic, superstition, religion, and science. The ancient magicians were seen as symbols of wisdom, keepers of secrets, and masters of the arts, mathematics and science, particularly chemistry. Because magicians were believed to be individuals with access to supernatural powers, they were both feared and respected.

Spells and incantations had been used by the Egyptians for thousands of years and the Greeks carried this tradition forward, as evidenced by surviving Greek papyri containing magic records that date back to the 4th and 3rd century BC.

to read the rest of this article please copy and paste this link into your browser: http://www.ancient-origins.net/history-ancient-traditions/magic-ancient-greece-necromancy-curses-love-spells-and-oracles-007348/page/0/1

The Witches library

 

content

Witch medicine is wild medicine. It does more than make one healthy, it creates lust and knowledge, ecstasy and mythological insight. In Witchcraft Medicine the authors take the reader on a journey that examines the women who mix the potions and become the healers; the legacy of Hecate; the demonization of nature’s healing powers and sensuousness; the sorceress as shaman; and the plants associated with witches and devils. They explore important seasonal festivals and the plants associated with them, such as wolf’s claw and calendula as herbs of the solstice and alder as an herb of the time of the dead–Samhain or Halloween. They also look at the history of forbidden medicine from the Inquisition to current drug laws, with an eye toward how the sacred plants of our forebears can be used once again.

Really loved this book and would recommend it anyone, from novice to long time established practitioners. Happy reading and blessings.

HEKATE (or Hecate)

HEKATE (Hecate) was the goddess of magic, witchcraft, the night, moon, ghosts and necromancy. She was the only child of the Titanes Perses and Asteria from whom she received her power over heaven, earth, and sea.

Hekate assisted Demeter in her search for Persephone, guiding her through the night with flaming torches. After the mother-daughter reunion became she Persephone’s minister and companion in Haides.

Three metamorphosis myths describe the origins of her animal familiars: the black she-dog and the polecat (a mustelid house pet kept by the ancients to hunt vermin). The dog was the Trojan Queen Hekabe (Hecuba) who leapt into the sea after the fall of Troy and was transformed by the goddess. The polecat was either the witch Gale, turned as punishment for her incontinence, or Galinthias, midwife of Alkmene (Alcmena), who was transformed by the enraged goddess Eileithyia but adopted by the sympathetic Hekate.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: http://www.theoi.com/Khthonios/Hekate.html