Witchcraft with Fairies; Walking the Wild Woods

Here is no protective circle, no prayers, no names of power; we have left the strained company of the magicians and are back in the countryside where the fairies are natural company.” – K. Briggs, in The Anatomy of Puck chapter 8, discussing a folk ritual to obtain a fairy companion.

There is a long history of witches working with fairies in various ways, both learning from them and being in service to them. In modern paganism we more often see this relationship played out very differently, with the Good Folk being approached from a more ceremonial magic perspective or treated as a kind of spirit guide or ally. When we look to folklore and early modern witchcraft we see a different  picture and it is this one that I base my own personal practice on.

To continue reading……

 

Goddess Aradia

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Aradia was a Moon Goddess from Tuscany, honored by the witches of that region but not well known outside of Italy until in 1899, when the American folklorist Charles Leland published Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches   Leyland claimed the book was the religious text belonging to a group of Tuscan witches who venerated Diana as the Queen of the Witches.  Leyland was both a hero and a learned scholar educated in Germany and America.  He had a knack of being accepted by secret societies and was embraced by the Tuscan witches.  Leyland was given material for his books from a hereditary witch named Maddalena including the Vangelo or Gospel of the Witches.

To continue reading….

http://sacredwicca.com/goddess-aradia

Four Books To Learn More About Aradia

There may be no other text more debated or controversial than Aradia, or Gospel of the Witches by Charles Leland, purported to be given to him by an Italian Witch named Maddalena. However, there may be no other text that has been as influential on modern witchcraft and particularly Wicca than Aradia, or Gospel of the Witches.

To continue reading…..

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/matauryn/2018/06/22/five-books-to-learn-more-about-aradia/

 

 

Who Was Aradia? The History and Development of a Legend

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Aradia is familiar to most contemporary Pagans and Witches as the principal figure in Charles G. Leland’s Aradia, or the Gospel of the Witches, first published in 1899. Leland presents her as the daughter of Diana, the goddess of the moon, by her brother Lucifer, “the god of the Sun and of the Moon, the god of Light” (Leland, 1899, 1998:1), who is sent to earth to teach the poor to resist the oppression of the wealthy classes through magic and witchcraft. Through Leland’s work, Aradia’s name and legend became central to the Witchcraft revival. Between 1950 and 1960, “Aradia” was probably the secret name of the Goddess in Gardnerian Craft (it has since been changed), and she has also given her name to numerous contemporary Witchcraft traditions (Clifton, 1998:73).

To continue reading please go to links below.

 

http://www.google.com/amp/s/elegantshapeshifter.tumblr.com/post/171045145746/who-was-aradia-the-history-and-development-of-a/amp

 

https://elegantshapeshifter.tumblr.com/

Diana’s Moon Rays – Part II

In Part 1 of Diana’s Moon Rays I explore the goddess Diana’s importance in Italian witchcraft, and her place in Charles G. Leland’s 1899 The Aradia.  Read Part 1 first <

This article was first published in 2013 in the anthology The Faerie Queens.  I am currently revisiting some of my research on Diana, the influences on her cult and the influences her cult had on subsequent Western occultism.

To contunue reading

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/adamantinemuse/2017/01/goddess-diana-moon-rays-part-2/

 

Fairies From all Around the World

Written by Hypatia

For Coven Life

28th April 2018

Over time I have come to understand that we each connect to these beings in such different ways. They are born from the world around us at the time, and connect us to the ethereal.  Some are anthropomorphic, meaning they take human form, some in animal form, some as angels, others take their element form and yet others are all one and the same.

Throughout our childhood they are our spirit guardians and help us see through the veil that has been hung by our modern day adults.

As children we naturally accept what is around us as fact, therefore we engage in play, conversation and even moments of soothing with these beings. In some cultures with ancient origins such beings are encouraged by adults as they sever as protectors for their children. The children then take these guardians into their adult life that protect them till their final days.

As adults in modern day wester cultures we are encouraged to live in what is perceived as “reality”.  A reality that earns money, keeps house, has a family and a solid social network of other people who are also living a reality, that help us keep our reality in check. When someone says to you “Have you done a Reality check lately”? All their trying to say is: are you comparing your life to someone else’s? If it is not on someone else’s track then you better start changing.

This reality which we willingly accept throughout adulthood is what keeps us confined, keeps us chained, keeps us enslaved to this perception of how we need to be, what we need to do and how we need to act.

As soon as an adult experiences moments of visions relating to these beings, modern western society deals with it through medication.  Suppressing their imagination and calling it delusion. In cultures that still hold on to their ancient roots, a child or young adult with such “delusions” would be sent to the local medicine man not to be treated for his illness but to be trained as a Shaman for his gift!

Fairies come into our lives as adults for many reasons. One of the main ones I believe is that they allow us to question what belongs to us and what belongs to someone else. A “Reality Check on the reality check”

In other words are you living your own reality or the reality of everyone else around you?

Fairies encourage you to release your true inner being, your own elemental.

They are your true self as they are made of your very own DNA.

You cannot hide anything from them, lie to them or cheat them because you are doing all that to you. If you do, it manifests as disease, illness of the soul and the mind.

These beings are beloved, feared and revered throughout history and all over the world.

Down here the Indigenous Australians of the North have their fairy beings called Mimi and are displayed in cave paintings from more than 40- 60 thousand years ago!

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimi_(folklore)

Below is a link referencing fairies from all around the world, all four corners and from new world to ancient.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_beings_referred_to_as_fairies

 

In Ireland they have my old time favourite the Pooka. This however is not exactly on the cute sweet scale. There is no fairy more feared in Ireland than the Pooka. People’s interpretation of spiritual beings can be varied. Some have the Pooka as a beneficent spirit, one that plays tricks. Take for instance the old classic movie with Jimmy Stewart called “Harvey” in 1950. He befriends with this beneficent spirit that helps him see the true nature of human beings. Meanwhile while Jimmy is very different from the norm, in this movie he is portrayed as crazy because he takes the time to talk to his Pooka. Therefore the Pooka or Pukka is considered to bring both good and bad fortune. It is whatever we perceive it to be. No one can tell us what is real and what isn’t, this is up to us to decide.

In ancient Greece these spirit fairies came as Nymphs. Usually women, very beautiful and ready to draw in any man to them. In fact this is where the word Nymphomaniac came from.

http://www.theoi.com/Nymphe/Nymphai.html

These were elemental beings that were in the water, forest, trees, air, and even fire.

When connecting to your fairy, try connecting to it through a mediation first, indoors, in a forest, in your backyard, anywhere outdoors, with and without music, with dance, instruments, whatever it takes. When you are confident with its presence then begin to research it. In other words allow your inner being to call your Fay in rather than tarnishing your perception of what your fairy is supposed to look like, do and act. Remember they are an extension of you!

Fairies are nothing new, they have been with man since the dawn of time and hold the secrets to the beginning of the universe. Each and every fairy is unique in the most ethereal manner, why because they are part of the universal code, they are a reflection of our very self. We give them the power to appear to us and in return they share the secrets of the universe.

 

 

 

 

Willow ~ a tree witch

Willow

Willows which by water stand
Ease us to the Summerland.

 

Salix alba

Tree of Enchantment, Tree of Witcheries

Fifth month of the Celtic Tree calendar, 

April 15th – May 12th

 

Fifth consonant of the Ogham alphabet – Saille


Saille Ogham

Planet: Moon

Element: Water

Symbolism: Resonance and Harmony

Stone: Moonstone

Birds: Hawk, Snowy Owl

Color: Silver

Deity: Persephone, Hecate, Cerridwen, 

Artemis, Selene, Luna, Diana, Brigit

Sabbat: Beltane

Folk names: Osier, Pussy Willow, Saille, Salicyn Willow, Saugh Tree, White Willow, 

Witches Aspirin, Withe, Withy

 

Medicinal properties

Willow bark contains salicin, or Salicylic acid, used to make aspirin. 

Infusions from the bark have long been used as a remedy for cholls, rheumatism, and fevers. 

Willow sap applied to the skin can remedy acne, and a strong decoction of boiling 

the bark and leaves in water can be rubbed into the scalp for dandruff.

 

Magickal properties

New Moon magick, creativity, fertility, female rights of passage, inspiration, emotion, binding. Love, Love divination, protection, healing.

 

Also known as the tree of immortality because of its ability to 

re grow from a fallen branch in moist ground.

 

A wand made from Willow wood has many uses: 

sleep with it and have more vivid dreams, use it to draw down the moon, 

protection for underworld journeying

 

Magickal Brooms, witch’s brooms are traditionally bound with a willow’s branch.

 

 

There once was a Willow, and he was very old,

And all his leaves fell off from him, and left him in the cold;

But ere the rude winter could buffet him with snow,

There grew upon his hoary head a crop of mistletoe.

All wrinkled and furrowed was this old Willow’s skin,

His taper finger trembled, and his arms were very thin;

Two round eyes and hollow, that stared but did not see;

And sprawling feet that never walked, had this most ancient tree.

~Julianna Horatia Ewing, “The Willow Man” ”

Read more from the original post

Thanks to

http://www.thegoddesstree.com/trees/Willow.htm

Faeries in the Garden

Faeries in the Garden

In some NeoPagan traditions, the Fae are often welcomed and celebrated. In particular, the Beltane season is believed to be a time when the veil between our world and that of the Fae is thin.

It is important to note that the Fae are typically considered mischievous and tricky, and should not be interacted with unless one knows exactly what one is up against. Don’t make offerings or promises that you can’t follow through on, and don’t enter into any bargains with the Fae unless you know exactly what you’re getting – and what is expected of you in return.

If your tradition is one that celebrates the magical link between mortals and Faeries, you may want to take advantage of the fertile Beltane season to invite the Fae into your garden. Here are some ways you can make your outdoor space welcoming to the Fae.

  • Build small houses or caves out of stones in your yard. Tuck them into hidden places under bushes, or in your flower garden.
  • Craft small wooden chairs and tables to place outside. Paint them in bright colors, and wrap them in ivy or other vining plants.
  • Some people believe the Fae are attracted to water. Place a birdbath or a small wishing well as an inviting spot for Faeries.
  • Create a circle of stones as a magical place for the Fae.
  • Faeries are often associated with the sound of bells. Make a bell wand and place it in a spot where the breeze with catch it and draw the Fae in, or hang tiny bells from your tree branches.

Some gardeners believe that certain types of flowers are practically magnets for the faerie folk. If you’d like to attract them to your flower garden, plant things like sunflowers, tulips, heliotrope and other flowers that typically draw butterflies. Your herb garden can be a good place for faeries as well, if you include plants such as rosemary, thyme, mugwort, and members of the mint family.

If you’re partial to trees, in addition to your flower and herb gardens, you might want to consider planting tree that are associated with the Fae. Oak trees, in particular, are often linked to faeries, and in some areas it is believed that a great oak is the home of the Faerie King. Another tree to plant for the fae is the hawthorn, which is seen as a portal to the faerie realm. Along with the ash tree, known as a home for faerie clans, the oak and hawthorn form a perfect trifecta of fae-attracting trees.

To see beautiful image incuded in this article by Patti Wigington please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/welcoming-the-fae-at-beltane-2561634