Pantheon- People never really stopped believing.

March 24th 2018

Written By Hypatia Of Alexandrea for Coven Life


I started to think back to when I first started observing the different Gods and Goddesses in their glory. Coming from a Christian religion and believing that there was only one God it was difficult for me to truly grasp the Many.

Slowly converting from the monotheistic strict religious guidelines I come to realize that the One was once Many. In other words before monotheism came along there was of course many God’s observed, especially by the very creators of the now dominant monotheistic religions.

The Gods of the Pantheons became rolled into one and most others were given the titles of angels and saints. This is evident in the Orthodox Christian religion where some Gods and Goddesses have the title of saints such as Athena, Apollo, Aphrodite, Artemis and the list goes on!

These Gods never ceased to be observed, they were merely converted into saints and most of the time celebrated accordingly to their healing qualities that are connected to their ancient roots.

Being a practitioner of health I of course am drawn to the healing powers of the God’s. In ancient times entire temples were built where people would flock in dedication to be healed by the God’s of health. Even such greats as Hippocrates the father of Medicine adorned these temples.

On the 27th of March, the 147th day of  the new year one of such Gods is celebrated and Her name was Hygeia.


She was the Goddess of healing powers and medicine. The health bringer, the preserver of humanity from sickness and protecting all those from dangers on land and sea. This is where the very word hygiene was taken from. Along with Her father, Their temples were spruced along the Mediterranean helping those in need. Her father was Asclepius and her siblings were Goddesses also connected to health and well-being. Her symbol just like her father is the serpent. In ancient times the serpent was considered the healer sent from the God’s themselves. It was not until later that monotheistic religions turned the serpent into the villain.



Interestingly in medicine the serpent is still used as a symbol of medicine!


Hygeia’s bowl with the serpent used in pharmacology today.



Her Fathers Rod, The Rod of Asclepius used as a symbol of medicine today.

These Gods have been ingrained into the modern Orthodox Christians DNA, and as you can see above also into our western modern day life. Somehow throughout history clearly the people of the Pantheon were not willing to let go so easily and found ways to weave their God’s into their currant way of life. For instance if you are familiar with the Greek Greeting of Yiasou, or (Γειά σου) stin Igia sou, all that translates to is, “ To your Health or , Hygeia”, as the very Goddesses name now days actually still translates as health or hygiene. So Modern Greek Orthodox are still hailing to the Goddess Hygeia unawares, so much so they have Her in their greetings, in their departures and of course in salutations to their actual health. Western society revers these God’s enough to have them as their symbol.

I myself take great interest in observing the religions and cultures of the world. I not only observe and call upon my ancestral God’s but those that I connect with in my soul. Throughout history one God gets converted into the next, same God’s different names, cultures and times. There is no one more right or wrong, however it is important to recognize rather than deny. Denying and insisting that only you’re God or God’s exist is mere ignorance of the structure of creation. Recognize where our faith, our belief systems and our structures originated from.  Traveling the world you see time and time again the similarities of religious observations throughout all different cultures. Learning to embrace all of humanity together with your own religious path is true spirituality, this is the path of an enlightened healer for the self and others. As a witch, a healer, a sage, a shaman call it what you will you are the Earth keeper, the Keeper and guardian of all that is dear to Her. Respect all that she has granted to humanity, breath her in with utmost gratitude, she is your healer, your Hygeia or call her what you may, she who comes by many names and is still the same and the One.

Happy healing and Γειά σου!

Blessings to you and yours


Ceridwen, The Mother of Poetry and Wisdom



Marc Choyt 10/29/2013

The steam still rises from Ceridwen’s cauldron. She is the mother of poetry, wisdom and prophecy, the triple goddess of Maid, Mother and Crone, shape shifting between life and death. Long, long ago, when the gods and goddesses roamed about the earth, visible to men and women, the White Crafty One, Ceridwen was married to Tegit Foel, the giant deity of a Bala lake.

They had two children—first a beautiful daughter and then, a son. That son was named Morfran. He was so repulsive to gaze upon, so ugly, that he was called Afagddu (“utter darkness”). Ceridwen would give him special powers. She would make him wise, overflowing with poetry and inspiration and for this, she needed a potion. Morda, a blind man, was to tend the fire, while Gwion Bach, a young boy, stirred this gift called, Awen.

Perhaps the cauldron was brimming with the oily light of stars, seasoned with the heart of regenerative joy, the labyerinths of infinite black nights, the sweet and bitter songs from rock and water, the elixir of spirit that can shred and make whole again. Life with all its paradoxes inherit in light and darkness, the seeds of wisdom that spring from the mysteries of contradiction—needed to cook a good long time—a year and a day to be exact. When it was ready, three drops would bring you wisdom but even a drop more than that would kill you. After many days of attentive care, three drops spilled on to Gwion’s thumb.

The pain from the boiling liquid was sharp and he immediately put it in his mouth—thus gaining the wisdom that Ceridwen had intended for Morfran. He knew Ceridwen would be in rage and he fled, using the powers of the elixir to change himself into a hare. Ceridwen shape-shifted to a greyhound, in pursuit. He turned into a fish, jumping into a river; she, an otter. He, a song bird; she, a hawk. Finally, he turned into a kernel of corn and she became a hen, finding him and eating him with little effort.

Yet soon, Ceridwen became pregnant, immediately knowing Gwion was in her belly. Though she was resolved to kill him, when he was born, he was so beautiful that infanticide was impossible. Instead, she sewed him in a leather bag and tossed him into the ocean. In Wales, near Aberdyfi, Wales, by Prince Elffin ap Gwyddno was walking along the shore and found the bag. He opened it up and saw the magic child whose forehead was white, like his mother’s. Immediately, the baby recited this poem:


Fair Elffin, cease your weeping! Despair brings no profit. No catch in Gwyddno’s weir Was ever as good as tonight’s. Let no one revile what is his; Man sees not what nurtures him. Gwyddno’s prayers shall not be in vain. God breaks not his promises. Fair Elphin, dry your cheeks!It does not become you to be sad.Though you think you have no gainUndue grief will bring you nothing, Nor will doubting the miracles of the Lord.Though I am small, I am gifted. From the sea and the mountain, from rivers’ depths God sent bounty to the blessed.Elphin of cheerful disposition— Meek is your mind. You must not lament so heavily. Better God than gloomy foreboding. Though I am frail and littleAnd wet with spume of Dylan’s sea, I shall earn in a day of contention Riches better than three score for you. Elphin of the remarkable qualities, Grieve not for your catch. Though I am frail here in my bunting, There are wonders on my tongue. You must not fear greatly While I am watching over you. By remembering the name of the TrinityNone can overcome you.

He was given the name of Taliesin and was raised by Elphin and his wife with great love and happiness. Their wealth increased through all the days. Taliesin grew up to be greatest of all bards, and sang the ancient and true songs of wisdom in the court of King Author. You can still hear his songs if you put your ear to heartbeat of the earth and feel the steam rising from Ceridwen’s cauldron. For Taliesin and Ceridwen, the mother of poetry, wisdom and prophecy, the triple goddess of Maid, Mother and Crone, lives on even now, shape shifting between life and death.


Building a Home Shrine

I spent the weekend building a home shrine. All this time and I’ve never really had one, at least not intentionally. There are plenty of sacred spaces in the house, don’t get me wrong. I have special tabletops and shelves that tend to accumulate meaningful objects, and I have a working altar in my bedroom. Our coven’s altar is erected fresh every time we have circle. I also maintain an altar to Freya, so it’s not that I’m necessarily lacking in sacred space.

But I wanted something that actually does something for the household, even when I’m not actively working magic or in worship. I want to come home from work, light the hearth (so to speak), and know that good things are coming our way. This season is all about beginnings, growth, and setting down new roots and I’ve been looking to rebuild my personal practice. My coven, Foxfire, is self-sufficient enough now that everyone has their own projects and curiosities to pursue without me or my working partner having to step in nearly as frequently. Part of it is that I’ve also relaxed a bit. When you’re first starting a group—at least, if you’re a type A person like me, and especially if it’s a traditional group—it’s easy to feel like you have to control every little thing or else something’s going to blow up in your face. I don’t feel that way anymore.

One of the first steps to building a solitary practice, according to many practitioners and introductory books, is to construct an altar or shrine at home. You may collect elemental symbols, deity representations, or other objects sacred to your personal tradition. It becomes a focal point, and eventually just spending time their can trigger the mental shift required for magic.


It’s a lot of fun going through this process all over again as an old hand, and way more challenging than I thought it would be. The thing is, I didn’t want a lot of holdover from my previously stagnant practice. At some point, clutter just stops being meaningful. The altar I’d had wasn’t flowing the way it should be, and some of the things I’d been carrying around for decades just didn’t carry much meaning anymore beyond the nostalgia.

So I cleared and cleaned the table I wanted to use, which sits in the main room of our covenstead. I dug out a piece of green cloth, one that’s been in my fabric stash for years but I’ve never used for anything. I knew I wanted lots of green and gold, because I was stuck on the idea that part of the home shrine’s job would be to foster wealth, health, and happiness. I made a brand new pillar candle out of palm wax, dyed in layers of green and yellow. I also wanted to use a candle that one of my initiates had given me for Yule, because it reminds me of our relationship, which is one of the most important to me. A censer for incense, too, because that’s an important magical trigger for me. I also added a print of a fox from Wolfsisters Creations, which I picked up at PantheaCon. Fox is our coven symbol, but also a significant personal symbol, and he needed to be part of any home shrine a might build.

I hesitated before adding deity statues. On the one hand, this is a Wiccan household, and the gods of the Wica are central to my personal practice. On the other hand, no statue adequately expresses this, and mine in particular have been carted around for so long that they definitely don’t match up with things in my head, years later. I’ve included them for now, because they do make me feel at home. That may change. I also added one of the altar-sized prints from Laura Tempest Zakroff, made from a recycled hunk of very pointy wood. This image hits me viscerally in a way that the statues don’t.

In the middle, surrounded by the candles, I set a piece of tourmalinated quartz. I’ve actually never used crystals or stones in my magical practice, but I’ve always collected and loved them. Crystals always felt a little too New Agey, so this is very much an experiment. My friend Ari said something to me in February about imagining the tourmaline in the quartz functioning as little roads jutting out in all directions and carrying the energy of the spell along with it. I really dug that image, especially for prosperity and money magic. So if using crystals makes me New Agey, then I guess I’m New Agey. I find that I’m caring less and less about labels these days, anyway.

This morning I lit the candles for the first time, set a fresh bouquet of flowers, and otherwise said hello to the spirits of this household. Things already feel fresher and more open, so I’m really looking forward to maintaining this space over time. I’ve set out an offering bowl, which I intend to keep full of clean water and whatever treats I wrangle as the months pass.

Do you keep a home shrine? Is it separate from your working altar the way mine is? How has it impacted your Craft practice?

Interesting Video Explaining “What is Witchcraft?”

I found this little over 3 minute YouTube video explanation of what Witchcraft is very interesting. The woman explaining it puts it in a way that I would have. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.–HN9bzZAhURuVkKHZyUDY0QtwIILTAC&usg=AOvVaw0G7wrFjI6yZ4MQFg3K4puk

What is Paganism? A Factual Overview

A simple, factual explanation of what Paganism actually is. It is pure information written for anyone who is non Pagan or who is Pagan but wants to know more. It is not meant to impress or proselytize.

NOTE: I have had some letters from Christians who claim this essay is anti-Christian. That is not the case. The comparisons with Christianity are objective and without any harmful intent.

In simplest terms Paganism is a religion of place, or a native religion, for example the Native American’s religion is Pagan, Hinduism is a form of Paganism. All Pagan religions are characterized by a connection and reverence for nature, and are usually polytheistic i.e. have many Gods and/or Goddesses.

Modern Paganism as practiced in the west is particular to the native peoples of the west and although there are many forms most are descended from Celtic origins. Modern Paganism or ‘neo-Paganism’ has the following characteristics:

1. Paganism is a religion of nature, in other words Pagans revere Nature. Pagans see the divine as immanent in the whole of life and the universe; in every tree, plant, animal and object, man and woman and in the dark side of life as much as in the light. Pagans live their lives attuned to the cycles of Nature, the seasons, life and death.

2. Unlike the patriarchal religions (Christianity, Islam, Judaism) the divine is female as well as male and therefore there is a Goddess as well as a God. These deities are within us as well as without us (immanent); they are us. They are not simply substitutes for the Muslim or Judeo-Christian God. This is because the Gods of the major religions tend to be super-natural i.e. above nature whereas Pagan deities are natural, symbolizing aspects of nature or human nature. Having said that God and Goddess are split from the Great Spirit or Akashka which probably equates to the God of

the patriarchal religions.

3. The Goddess represents all that is female and the God represents all that is male. But because nature is seen as female the Goddess has a wider meaning. Often called Mother Earth or Gaia she is seen as the creatrix and sustainer of life, the mother of us all which makes all the creatures on the planet our siblings.

4. There are sub-groups of named Gods and Goddesses called Pantheons, drawn from the distant past, for example Isis and Osiris from Egypt or Thor, Odin, Freya et al from Norse religion and mythology. Ancient Pagans would have worshipped one or a small number of Gods and Goddesses, whilst often recognizing the validity of other people’s deities. The concept of an overall, un-named Goddess and God, the sum totals of all the others, appears to be a recent one but individual named deities represent particular human qualities or archetypes and are often used as a focus for celebrations and spiritual rites.

5. Paganism has developed alongside mankind for thousands of years; as cultures have changed so has Paganism, yet it is grounded in deep rooted genetic memories that go back to neolithic times and before. Thus Paganism is not just a nature religion but a naturalreligion.

6. Paganism in the west takes a number of forms including Wicca, Druidism, and Shamanism.

7. To Pagans the four ancient elements, Earth, Air, Fire and Water have special significance. The importance of these is hard to define because they have so many correspondences, for example they are associated with the four directions, North, East, South and West. Each element is a kind of spiritual substance from which all things are made especially ourselves and at the same time are Guardians both of ourselves and of the Goddess and God, and guarding the gateways between this world and the other world.

8. Many Pagans believe in reincarnation in some form. It gives Pagans a substantially different view of life. Early Christians saw Karma as a kind of treadmill, trapping people in endless reincarnations, never free. But Pagans see reincarnation as, at best, a chance to improve or to continue unfinished work, and at worst just a simple re-cycling of souls.



The re-emergence of Paganism

The revival of Western Paganism is mainly due to the creation of Wicca, the nice modern name for Witchcraft. However Paganism is not Wicca; Wicca is an Occult form of Paganism.

The old religion was virtually wiped out by the church of Rome using a combination of propaganda, torture and genocide. Some people held on to the old religion.

These were often the wisemen and women or Witches, the root ‘wit’ meaning ‘wise’. The church became impatient and began a purge beginning around 1484 involving the burning of Witches and wholesale slaughter of thousands of people across Europe just on suspicion of being Witches. Not surprisingly, in the face of such oppression the old religion went ‘underground’ and Witches dedicated to preserving the religion formed themselves into secret groups called covens.

Christianity’s purge was so successful that the old religion was virtually extinct by the 1900s but in 1899 a book was published by Charles Leland called ‘The Gospel of Aradia’ about Witches in Northern Italy who practiced ‘La Vecchia Religione’ – the Old Religion.

In 1921 an English historian, Margaret Murray published a book, ‘The Witch Cult in Western Europe’ in which she maintained that Witchcraft had been a religion. A British ex colonial administrator called Gerald Gardner supposedly revived Witchcraft and called it Wicca. In 1951 the laws against Witchcraft in Britain were repealed and he published a milestone book on the subject, ‘Witchcraft Today’.

Since that time Wicca has grown in popularity and has encouraged the revival of the original Pagan roots and the re-emergence of other Pagan branches such as the Northern tradition and the modern Druids. Wicca itself has become more eclectic and has absorbed elements of other systems such as the Qabala and elements of Hindu. While Wicca is relatively new, Paganism is as old as mankind and its traditions are still being rediscovered.

What do Pagans do?

Pagans revere the cycles of Nature through rituals or ceremonies of various kinds. Pagans of the western traditions celebrate up to eight festivals or Sabbats each year (not all Pagans celebrate all the Sabbats). They comprise the four solar quarters i.e. the two solstices (longest and shortest days) and the two equinoxes (day and night are the same length) plus four Celtic ‘fire’ festivals. All these mark important events in the cycle of life and also symbolise changes in the Goddess and God. They are:

Samhain(pronounced “sowain”), 31st October: the feast of the dead; remembrance of ancestors and people, now dead, who were important to us. It marks the end of the Celtic year and the start of the spiritual new year. Also known as All Hallows day, the night before being All Hallows Eve (Halloween) or all souls night.

Yule, the winter solstice, 21st December approx.: rebirth of the sun and the gradual lengthening of the days towards springtime and new life.
Imbolc or Bride’s day: start of spring and the return of the Goddess to the land.
Ostara (Easter), the spring equinox, 21st March: Return of the sun from the south, springtime proper. Some celebrate a holy union between God and Goddess.
Beltane (starting on May day): Summertime begins celebrating new life and the holy marriage of God and Goddess.

Midsomer (Midsummer) or Litha, the summer solstice, 21st June approx.: Everything is green thanks to the…

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Making Your Pentacle Your Own

My pentacle that I wear daily is approximately 1 1/2 inches in diameter. On the front of it is the Goddess with her arms raised. I apologize for the quality of the picture but I did not want to disturb Cleopatra or Starbabie, my two canine familiars, who are using me as their pillow. You can see part of Cleopatra’s head in the picture.

(This style pentacle and others are available from Magickal Necessities. See their link on the top left side of our Homepage)

My pentacle is one thing that I wear close to my Heart Chakra on the cord is also a Unicorn pendant given to me about 15 years ago by my husband, a green Adventurine to help with my back problems, and a heart pendant the containg clear quartz made for me by my dearest sister (the one I went to Germany to visit in 2016).

I have worn a pentacle blessed to help protect me from metaphysical as well as physical assault of any kind. But the one felt different after I cleansed and blessed it. So I asked my guides why and then meditated waiting for answer. I learned that not only did the points on this pentacle represent the five elements, Spirit, Air, Fire, Earth, and Water, they also each represented a deity I work with or works through me. Starting at the top and going clockwise the points represent many different aspects of the Horn God, Mary Magdalalene who is one of my guides, Ra my patron god, Kwan Yin/Sirona healing goddesses that with through me to help others, Mother Earth my matron goddess. The goddess on the front is the Great Mother and the horseshoe shape thing she is holding above her head a creative muse that helps me immensely Collopie. By finding out this information truly made this MY pentacle as I seriously doubt anyone else would have the same beings at the same points as I do.

To make your pentacle your own you could do it the way I did or however you are inspired to turn a pendant you bought as a symbol of your spiritual path into a one of a kind personal amulet. Continue reading “Making Your Pentacle Your Own”

Voodoo History Basic Principles Background

I have decided it is appropriate to bring you history and what I can find on histories and practices of different Earth based religions beside the mostly commonly brought to you in this site. Since this is a site that was made to teach and bring you information outside of main stream Wicca. The first articles are on Vodun or in some parts of the world referred to as Voodoo.

Ask a hundred different voodoo priest about voodoo and you will get a hundred different answers.

The word ‘vodun’ — the Haitian word ‘Voodoo’ is derived from — comes from the African Fon Language which is still spoken today in Benin. Vodun means “divinity” or “Idol”.

The history of voodoo does not start, as many people believe around 1500 AD in Haiti, but about 15,000 years before Christ in Africa. Thus, the real source of voodoo is the Egyptian pyramids. These people would later come to be called ‘Yoruba’. They were slaves to the Pharaohs and Kings. These people were later released however they never forgot the unbelievable things that they saw. They had a profound admiration for God and desired to know him.

At This time the Yoruba crossed into Africa from Egypt, using a route which crossed over into Afica from the Nile …

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Religions of the world Vodun (a.k.a. Voodoo) and related religions

Vodun is sometimes called Voodoo, Vodoun, Vodou.
Religions related to Vodun are: Candomble, Lucumi, Macumba, and Yoruba)

General background:

Vodun (a.k.a. Vodoun, Voudou, Voodoo, Sevi Lwa) is commonly called Voodoo (vû’dû) by the public. The name was derived from the god Vodun of the West African Yoruba people who lived in 18th and 19th century Dahomey. Its roots may go back 6,000 years in Africa. That country occupied parts of today’s Togo, Benin and Nigeria. Slaves brought their religion with them when they were forcibly shipped to Haiti and other islands in the West Indies.

Vodun was actively suppressed during colonial times.

“Many Priests were either killed or imprisoned, and their shrines destroyed, because of the threat they posed to Euro-Christian/Muslim dominion. This forced some of the Dahomeans to form Vodou Orders and to create underground societies, in order to continue the veneration of their ancestors, and the worship of their powerful gods.” 1

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Dates and Times For December Solstices

Because of the 17 hours difference between Chicago, Illinois, USA and Sydney, Australia the peak of the solstices are happening at the exact same time. When I first started this web site my vision was to bring information out about the Wheel of the Year for anyone living anywhere on Mother Earth. Although I have missed some of the dates and information for the Southern Hemisphere I am going to try to make sure I am on top of getting it done this year.

Southern Hemisphere Summer Solstice 2017

Friday, December 22nd at 3:27 AM AEDT

Northern Hemisphere Winter Solstice 2017

Thursday, December 21st at 10:27 AM CST

May your holiday be blessed with positive energy, joy, laughter, family, and friends!

Love Lady Beltane and the CL Staff

Share Your Campanion and/or Familar(s) With Us

Many of us have familiar companion that is also our familiar that we share a spiritual and magickal bond with. A few of us our blessed and lucky to have more than one in our life at the same time.

I am blessed with two campanoins/familiars in my life for the last almost four years.

First is a birthday present from my husband, my almost nine year old Miniature Pinscher, Drama Queen Cleopatra JAWS. Better know as Cleo. Who protects my home and land. Gives me energy on days I have to get things done and lack the energy to do it. She also helps protect my physically body from harm by other dogs or when I am traveling to Other worlds ( Celtic term for Astral Planes). Her birthday is February 11, 2009.

Second is a rescue dog my almost six year old Chihuahua, Princess Starbabie. Better know as Star. We got Star just before her second birthday and her sister welcomed her with open paws. Star is my constant companion. She attends every gathering and private circles I do. She lends me calmness and helps me be more level headed. She joins with Cleo in protecting my physically body from harm when I am traveling in Otherworlds. Star is who I turn to for calling energy when I am upset or angry. Her birthday is March 30 2012.

Both of my girls are boys to have as companions and familiars. One of both give me a reason to laugh hardy and sometimes long at funny things the do. I have found when I am down or depressed the antics increase causing me to laugh more and feel better.

Please tell us about your animal companion and/ or familiar. If you want to share a picture with us please send the photo, animals name, and your first in the body of an email to Subject line should say “My Animal”. If you want to share about a companion that has crossed The Raibow Bridge please do.

I  am looking forward to reading your stories and seeing you pictures.