THE WITCHES’ REDE OF CHIVALRY – Found on Witches of The Craft

Adapted from Rites From The Crystal Well)

Insofar as The Craft Of The Wise is the most ancient and most honourable creed of humankind, it behoves all who would be witches to act in ways that give respect to the Old Gods and Goddesses, to their brothers and sisters of The Craft, and to themselves

Chivalry is a high code of honour, which is of most ancient Pagan origin and must be lived by all who follow the Old Ways.

Know well that thoughts and intent put forth will wax strong on many planes of existence and return, bringing into creation that which has been sent forth. For this reason the adept must exercise discipline over his or her thoughts. Remember, ” as you sow, so shall you harvest”

It is only by preparing our minds to be as Gods that we may one day unite with the Godhead.

“This above all … to thine own self be true…”

A witch’s word must have the validity of a signed and witnessed document. It is only by developing such mental discipline that great power may be controlled and directed

It is well to refrain from speaking ill of others for not all truths of the matter may be known

Pass not unverified words about another. For the most part hearsay is a thing of falsehoods

Be honest with others. Have them know that honesty is likewise expected of them

The fury of the moment plays havoc with the truth. Strive always to keep your head

Harm not another. Think always of the consequences of your actions

Dignity, a gracious manner, and a good humour are much to be admired

As a witch you wield much power. Therefore exercise much discretion in its use

Courage and honour endure forever.

Offer friendship only to those worthy of it. To associate with younger souls will only pull you down

Those who follow the mysteries must be above reproach in the eyes of the world

Keep pride in thyself. Seek perfection in body and in mind

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Southern Hemisphere Beltane October 31st

Most Pagans coincide with the seasons.  While October the 31st is Samhain in the Northern hemisphere, it is time to celebrate the coming of summer and the Great Rite here in the Southern Hemisphere. Feasting and celebrations give opening to this wonderful festival of fertility. Our spring carnival (Melbourne Cup) held on the first Tuesday of November showcases some of the most beautiful rose gardens that Melbourne has to offer.

Below is a link of the Pagan Festivals and their locations held Australia wide for those interested.

http://wildhunt.org/2015/11/column-australias-pagan-festivals.html

 

Another link below identifies the Southern Hemisphere dates.

http://spheresoflight.com.au/index.php?page=sabbat

 

In the beginning it all seemed a little confusing, however as I become more and more in tune to the rhythms of Mother Nature I allowed myself to listen while she spoke to me. Now I  wait and listen for her call. She will let me know when and where. There is only one rule and that is her rule, as without this rhythm that she has gifted us, all would cease to exist.

Blessings to the Earth Mother, The Great Goddess of Fertility and the union that she has with The God, as without either we would be nothing.

Many Blessings to all

Hypatia

Runes of Odin / 2. URUZ/

 

Please, check the links so can can find more information about URUZ.  You should only read the part about URUZ because the  three links below will be available with each different rune I describe in my posts.

Galdr :  http://www.sunnyway.com/runes/galdr.html

Shamanic Journey with the Rune : http://www.northernshamanism.org/pathwalking-with-runes.html

Meanings : http://www.runemaker.com/futhark/uruz.shtml

URUZ

Strength

Element : Earth

Gemstone : Garnet

Colour : dark green, dark grey

Tree : Birch tree

Plant : Iceland Moss

God : Thor

http://www.runes.info/runepiece10.htm

http://runesecrets.com/rune-meanings/uruz

 

Divinations :  You have the strength to make your dreams come true but do not forget the responsibilities that come with this. Your strength is not imposing your will on others , this is  a strength for overcoming the attempts of the others to impose their will on you, a strength that does not allow interference into your choice.  Use this noble strength to stay focused on your goal. Do not allow you to be led astray. Do not allow negative people to upset you. Control your Ego and you will succeed.

This is a rune of changes. It requires control over whatever will be released in risky initiations, it draws new situations in life.

Reverse meaning :  you are unable to think clearly; bad health. Pay attention to the signs of your weakness or to the threats against you. You should become aware of your hidden strength.

Use : Uruz can be used on anything that needs strength, including yourself.  It can be used on objects or for healing.

The Rune can be drawn directly on parts of your body that need strength. It can also be drawn onto the main chakras, especially Solar Plexus chakra for strengthening the will. Draw it with your thumb and inhale deeply to take the Rune into yourself.

Power to stand for your will.

Change that requires courage facing new responsibilities and challenges.

Good health, vitallity, energy for overcoming or success.

Fertility

Magickal Use : it strenghtens the will and the muscles. Uruz stabilises the chaotic situation or state of mind. It is used in the Craft for drawing off unwanted control, for cutting off restrictions and breaking of barriers. It encourages confidence and courage. It can be used for restoration of hope, for increasing of the sexual desire, for strenghtening the mind.

Uruz is not safe when it is magically used. If not used correctly, it can bring disbalance and it can reverse the result , thus it can do harm.

Mythology : Here is a description of Thor given in the book by Neil Gaiman “ Norse mythology “

Thor, Odin`s son, is the thunderer….Huge he is, and red-bearded, and strong, by far the strongest of all the gods. His might is increased by his belt of strength, Megingjord:when he wears it, his strength is doubled….Thor`s mother was Jord, the earth goddess. Thor`s sons are Modi, the angry , and Magni, the strong. Thor`s daughter is Thrud, the powerful.

His wife is Sif, of the golden hair. She had a son , Ullr, before she married Thor…Ullr  is a god who hunts with bow and with arrows, and he is good with skis.

Thor is the defender of Asgard and Midgard”.

 

 

 

Brutal witch hunts in Papua New Guinea tied to jealousy

AP

12:44 a.m. CDT June 10, 2013
Story Highlights
  • Hundreds of cases of violent witch hunts have been documented
  • The violence appears to be spreading across the island
  • Some attribute the violence to economic %27jealousy%27

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — On a tropical island in Papua New Guinea where most people live in huts, a mob armed with guns, machetes and axes stormed a wooden house by night. They seized Helen Rumbali and three female relatives, set the building on fire and took the women away to be tortured. Their alleged crime: Witchcraft.

After being repeatedly slashed with knives, Rumbali’s older sister and two teenage nieces were released following negotiations with police. Rumbali, a 40-something former schoolteacher, was beheaded.

Her assailants claimed they had clear proof that Rumbali had used sorcery to kill another villager who recently died of sickness: The victim’s grave bore the marks of black magic, and a swarm of fire flies apparently led witch hunters to Rumbali’s home.

Violence linked to witch hunts is an increasingly visible problem in Papua New Guinea — a diverse tribal society of more than 800 languages and 7 million people who are mostly subsistence farmers. Experts say witch hunting appears to be spreading to parts of the country where the ruthless practices never took place before.

There is no clear explanation for the apparent uptick in killings in parts of the South Pacific nation, and even government officials seem at a loss to say why this is happening. Some are arguing the recent violence is fueled not by the nation’s widespread belief in black magic but instead by economic jealousy born of a mining boom that has widened the country’s economic divide and pitted the haves against the have-nots.

“Jealousy is causing a lot of hatred,” said Helen Hakena, chairwoman of the North Bougainville Human Rights Committee, which is based in the area Rumbali was killed. “People who are so jealous of those who are doing well in life, they resort to what our people believe in, sorcery, to kill them, to stop them continuing their own development.”

She said the witchcraft accusation against Rumbali was just an excuse.

“That was definitely a case of jealousy because her family is really quite well off,” Hakena said.

She said villagers were envious because Rumbali’s husband and son had government jobs, they had a “permanent house” made of wood, and the family had tertiary educations and high social standing.

The United Nations has documented hundreds of cases of sorcery-related violence in Papua New Guinea in recent years and many more cases in remote areas are thought to have gone unreported. It found the attacks are often carried out with impunity.

Until last month, the country’s 42-year-old Sorcery Act allowed for a belief in black magic to be used as a partial legal defense for killing someone suspected of inflicting harm through sorcery. The government repealed the law in response to the recent violence.

“There’s no doubt that there are really genuine beliefs there and in some circumstances that is what is motivating people: the belief that if they don’t kill this person, then this person is going to continue to bring death and misfortune and sickness on their village,” said Miranda Forsyth, a lawyer at Australian National University who has studied the issue.

But she said recent cases in Papua New Guinea don’t appear to be motivated by a genuine belief in the occult, but instead are a pretext under which the wealthy can be attacked by poorer neighbors, and, many times, get away with it.

She and other experts on witchcraft in the Melanesia region believe Papua New Guinea’s newfound prosperity and the growing inequality in its traditionally egalitarian culture is a significant cause of the violence. Neighboring Vanuatu and the Solomon Islands, where belief in black magic is also widespread, haven’t seen the same level of extreme violence against accused witches.

The difference, they say, is that Papua New Guinea has had the fastest economic growth.

A wealth of mineral resources and natural gas has transformed the nation’s long-stagnant economy into one of the world’s fastest growing over the past decade, increasing on average almost 7 percent annually from 2007 to 2010. Growth peaked at 8.9 percent in 2011 before slowing to 8 percent last year.

The Asian Development Bank reported last year that Papua New Guinea has one of the highest levels of inequality, if not the highest, in the Asia-Pacific region.

These socio-economic problems have inevitably played into a cultural landscape that includes a belief in witches and black magic, said Kate Schuetze, a regional researcher for Amnesty International.

“There is always a reason for the accusation, whether it’s jealousy, wanting to access someone else’s land, a personal grudge against that person or a previous land dispute,” Schuetze said.

Papua New Guinea Deputy Public Prosecutor Ravunama Auka doesn’t buy that jealousy has been behind a significant number of the sorcery-related slayings he had dealt with. While he did not have statistics, he said most victims were slain due to a genuine belief that they had killed through sorcery.

Auka had no doubt sorcery-related slayings were increasing, but could not explain why.

“There are all sorts of reasons, not only because some people are wealthy and some are not,” Auka said.

Another possible explanation is the spread of particularly vicious sorcery beliefs that before were just seen in the highland province of Chimbu, said anthropologist Philip Gibbs, a sorcery specialist and Roman Catholic priest who has lived in the wilds of Papua New Guinea for the past 41 years.

In Chimbu, people bury their dead in concrete so that the bodies will not be eaten at night by small demonic animals that they believe can possess the living. Villagers pay witch doctors to divine who among them are possessed by these demons, which they believe leave the person’s body at night and take on the form of any small animal.

Gibbs said those suspected of being possessed are often tortured to make confessions and are sometimes killed.

“That form is spreading to other provinces where it’s never existed before and we’re asking the question why,” Gibbs said.

Accused families abandon their small farms in a hurry, usually taking only what they can carry in a bag. The villagers must then decide who occupies the vacant land.

“That’s where the jealousy and the greed can come in,” Gibbs said.

Papua New Guinea is under growing international pressure to respond to the violence after a series of high-profile cases made world headlines.

In February, a mob stripped, tortured and bound a woman accused of witchcraft, then burned her alive in front of hundreds of horrified witnesses in Mount Hagan, the country’s third largest city. In July, police arrested 29 people accused of being part of a cannibal cult in Papua New Guinea’s jungle interior and charged them with the murders of seven suspected witch doctors.

In the case of Rumbali, which took place in April, no arrests have been made, but police said they are treating it as “first degree murder.”

Police Senior Inspector Cletus Tsien would not speculate on the motive for the crime.

“We know that this family was wealthy. We know that maybe there were bits and pieces of jealousy. We know they were accused of sorcery … but there’s no concrete evidence as to which factor contributed to the death of the late woman,” Tsien said.

12:44 a.m. CDT June 10, 2013

A 21st Century Witch Hunt

Witch hunts increase in Tanzania as albino deaths jump

TONNY ONYULO | Special for USA TODAY

Updated 7:45 a.m. CST Feb. 27, 2015

TABORA, Tanzania — Many women are living in fear in this rural part of northwestern Tanzania because they are increasingly being targeted by witch hunts — literally.

This East African country is grappling with an upswing in vigilante justice as villagers attack women they believe are witches responsible for the murders of albinos, whose white skin some believe possess magical powers.

Last month, some 200 angry villagers — mostly youths carrying axes, machetes and knives — grabbed Jane Faidha Bakari, 58, in Tabora, hacked her with sharp weapons and burned her alive while her helpless husband watched.

“They came around midnight banging on the door,” said Moses Bakari, her husband. “They broke into the house and hacked my wife with machetes and knives. They burned the body of my wife and later set fire on my house. They claimed that my wife was practicing witchcraft and killing albinos.”

The villagers believed the woman was using body parts from albinos — people born with the absence of pigment in their skin, eyes and hair — to practice witchcraft. Bakari fled with his three children and took refuge in a neighbor’s house.

“I neither knew nor heard that my wife was practicing witchcraft,” Bakari said. “I still don’t believe that I lost my wife to such a painful death. I will only heal if justice is done, because she was innocent.”

The murder of Bakari’s wife isn’t uncommon. Frightened neighbors-cum-vigilantes lynched, stoned or hacked more than 1,000 women to death last year, according to the Center for Advocacy in Rural Development, a Kenyan development group, and the Dar es Salaam-based Legal and Human Rights Center. The groups estimate more than 3,000 suspected witches, usually late middle-age and older women, were killed in the past six years alone.

“The government has failed to apprehend witch doctors who kill our innocent people,” said Wilson Asida, a Tabora resident. “They have killed many albinos to help them gain magical powers. We’ll kill them ourselves to get justice.”

Asida accused the government — which banned witchcraft in January — of relying too much on the courts to prove whether women were practicing witches. “They pretend as if they don’t know witchcraft exists,” he said.

Attacks against those with albinism also seem to be on the rise, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein said in a statement last week, citing at least three incidents in the past two months. The statement was in response to the “horrific murder and mutilation” of a 1-year-old baby with albinism earlier this month.

The agency worries the killings will only rise in the run-up to October’s Tanzanian presidential elections as political campaigners seek the help of seers who use albino body parts to foretell the future.

In the past 15 years, at least 75 albinos have been killed in Tanzania, but prosecutors have convicted just 10 people in those murders, according to the U.N. Albino organs fetch hundreds of dollars in illegal trading. Around 33,000 people out of a population of about 50 million have albinism, according to the Tanzanian Albinism Society.

Older women are suffering from the backlash against witches as a result of the albino deaths, said Erick Wandera Omwami, chief executive of the Center for Advocacy in Rural Development, who is pushing the government to expand its education campaign against killing albinos to include admonitions against harming alleged witches.

“It’s unlucky for older persons to live in this region, but we should know that every older person has a right to life like anyone else,” he said. “We’ll work together to help communities understand the rights of others and avoid retrogressive and barbaric actions on other human beings.”

Tanzanian police admit witchcraft-related killings are common in the country’s northwest but say catching the culprits is difficult. The lynchings tend to occur after someone dies unexpectedly in the community or when albinos go missing, said police spokesman Ignas Mtana.

Often, he said, sorcerers identify other witches as the perpetrators of the misfortunes. Because the same people who attack witches often consult with other enchanters and potentially also deal in albino body parts, it’s hard to get to the bottom of the cases, Mtana said.

The family members will go to soothsayers to find out the cause of death and the responsible person,” Mtana said. “The soothsayers will say the name of a witch as the cause of death.”

Mtana said police intervene in lynchings they witness and arrest anyone attacking a suspected witch on sight, but forces are spread thin throughout the region, which includes the great plains of the Serengeti.

In the meantime, women are hiding out of fear of being attacked.

“Someone dropped leaflets bearing my name” on a list of suspected sorceresses, said Rosemary Aziza, 76, who lives near Tabora. “I will hide until the things go back to normal.”

 

For a Water Cremation Ask a Mortician – Article from the Washington Post

This article may seem out of place on this website but I thought it a good one to share as we approach Sanhaim. If it is offensive to any reader I appologize. I feel it is important to consider and know other cultures biews on how to honor those who cross the veil into the Summerlands.

Article written by Tara Bahrampour in the October 20, 2017 issue of the Washington Post

In some Indonesian villages, families live with and care for the bodies of their loved ones for months or years after they die. In Japan, relatives of the deceased use chopsticks to remove large bone fragments from cremated ashes. In Mexico, mummified babies and children were once revered, and people would hold parties and games for them.

If those practices sound alarming, Caitlin Doughty would like to remind you that injecting a body with formaldehyde might seem appalling to people in some parts of the world. Recently, she crisscrossed the globe looking at how diverse, and even healing, death can be. Her new book, “From Here To Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death,” published this month, underlines how subjective our views on death are.

Doughty, 33, is a mortician in Los Angeles but, as she says, “that doesn’t really describe it.” She is an activist for a view of death that offers a lot more choices than Americans have traditionally been given. Doughty believes that what happens after a person dies can be much more personal, transcendent, and comforting than the mainstream funeral industry would have us believe.

By exploring death rituals around the world, her goal was to open the door to new possibilities.

“Even things that we find strange or repulsive or disrespectful can actually be quite beautiful when you break them down and tell the stories,” she said. “I was hoping to prove that change is possible and that even when I’m standing there with a son brushing off his father’s mummified corpse or I’m seeing a body being pulled off a compost pile, there’s so much respect there and it’s such a human process. You could be surrounded by mummies and still feel completely comfortable … because there are children running around and playing and laughing and it just feels like a family has gotten together to be happy and perform this ritual.”

Doughty, who has written a memoir about her profession and also hosts “Ask A Mortician,” a series of video shorts that discuss such phenomena as coffin births (when built-up gases cause a recently deceased pregnant woman’s body to expel a fetus) and what happened to the bodies of those who died on the Titanic. Some of the videos boast hundreds of thousands of views, perhaps testimony to a transformation Doughty says is underway as more Americans consider alternatives to the standard funeral package.

“People are going to funeral homes and going to ‘traditional’ services and they’re more and more not satisfied with them,” she said. “They see Mom and she looks kind of waxen, and they’re like, ‘This isn’t for me. There must be another way.’ ”

This attitude reflects a generational change, she said. “The people who are really dying right now are in their 80s and 90s, the Greatest Generation. I think they’re going to be the last generation to embrace the embalming the body, putting it on display, the wake, the Catholic ritual. Baby boomers, Generation X and Millennials are more open to these new ideas, to these green ideas, to these participatory ideas.”

The new ideas include allowing loved ones to attend a cremation, or doing a water cremation, in which the body is dissolved in very hot water and lye (avoiding the use of natural gas and the release of toxins).

Doughty got interested in death as a child after witnessing another child suffer a fall that was likely fatal. The experience made her afraid of death; she confronted her fear by entering a field in which death is commonplace.

But once there, she felt something was missing.

“It was always my instinct that we weren’t doing enough for our families, that we weren’t giving them enough emotional space to really grieve and have feelings,” she said. “Nothing makes me more angry when I hear about someone asking a funeral director, ‘Do you think that I could come in and fix Mom’s hair and fix Mom’s lipstick, because she liked to wear it this way,’ and they say no. It’s like their self-esteem is so wrapped up in them being the professionals.”

By contrast, many other cultures encourage intimate physical contact with the deceased, resulting in a warmer, less forbidding experience. “When you’re in Mexico the whole cemetery is just glowing as they interact with the memories of the dead,” she said.

For the book she also traveled within the United States to visit people who are promoting alternative methods, such as a North Carolina group that experiments with composting human remains and a mobile funeral pyre operation in Colorado.

To Doughty there’s no right or wrong way to do things, including the standard American way, but she would like people to have access to a wider range of choices — such as burying a loved one’s remains on private property, or setting them on a mountaintop for the vultures.

“These things aren’t available and you should be angry about that, because the American funeral system has a lobby,” she said. “There are regulations in place that make it incredibly hard to enter the funeral industry or have any new type of disposition become available.”

Recently, the cremation rate surpassed the burial rate in the United States for the first time. Still, embalming, which is particularly lucrative for funeral homes, is more common here than in any other country, and it is often done even when a body is going to be cremated, Doughty said. Twenty-nine states require funeral homes to be ready to embalm, meaning that even if a mortician serves only clients who don’t embalm, such as Muslims, “the state is going to say, ‘You need to go to mortician school and set up a $100,000 embalming room.’ ”

For herself, Doughty wants to be buried close to the surface of the earth, “in that really rich topsoil full of microbes and fungi. I want my body to decompose. As women we’re taught to be contained and clean and not have control over our bodies. … There’s something about the messiness of the process — the oozing and stretching out into the dirt and the earth, and that my organic matter is merging with other organic matter, that is what’s really attractive to me and really brings me comfort.”

Sacred Circle, Sacred Sphere: Mapping Consciousness with Seven Directions

by Selena Fox

Honoring the directions of the Sacred Circle is a widespread spiritual practice in ancient and contemporary Nature wisdom traditions. For many practitioners, honoring the directions is an essential component of all rituals. It is a way to create and to connect with sacred space. It also is a way of communing with Nature. Furthermore, it can be a way of mapping consciousness and viewing life.

The Sacred Circle with its directions is called by some, the “Magic Circle,” and by others, the “Medicine Wheel.” Some traditions emphasize the four compass directions of the Circle. Others work with the four compass points plus a central point representing unity. Some also include two additional directions in the center, up and down, to create a Sacred Sphere as well as the Sacred Circle. Qualities, images, colors, and other symbolic associations with the directions vary from path to path, but the idea of Sacred Circle as a place of balancing, healing, and wholeness extends across traditions.

I work with seven directions in my personal spiritual practice, in doing healing and counseling0…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Sacred Circle

Imbolc in the Southern Hemisphere

by Jenwytch

POSTED ON JULY 20, 2010 BY JENWYTCH AT THE OTHER SIDE. THIS ARTICLE IS ALSO IN THE JULY 2010 EDITION OF THE “AXIS MUNDI”.

Imbolc is a cross-quarter day midway between the winter solstice (Yule) and the spring equinox (Ostara) and is the celebration of the banishing of winter, the imminent arrival of Spring and the stirring of new life in the earth. Imbolc recognizes the maiden aspect of the triple goddess – the fresh, the young, the naïve, the new – and is strongly connected with the Goddess Brigid. It is associated with and also known as the festivals of Oimelc, Imbolg, Imbolic (Irish), Candlemas (British), Feast of Torches, Lupercalia (Italian/Latin), Brigid’s Day, and Brigantia (Scottish).

Here in the southern hemisphere, in 21st century Australia, we are far removed from the climate and rural lifestyles of the people of ancient Europe where this festival, and others that make up the Wheel Of The Year, originated.

Due to the 6 month offset of the seasons between the northern and southern hemispheres …

To read this rest of this article please click on this link: Imbolc in the Southern Hemisphere

Wiccan Holidays in the Southern Hemisphere

What is the Wheel of the Year, or Wiccan holidays, for those in the Southern Hemisphere?

It gets a little tricky, since Wicca was created in the Northern Hemisphere. Since it’s a nature religion, an Earth religion, this makes a big difference.

After all, a Midsummer ritual in the North happens in June.

In the South, though, this is midwinter!

So what does a Southern Witch do?

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Southern hemisphere Witch’s Holidays