Flashback 2003 Beltane

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Beltane

IN ancient times, people extinguished all their fires on Beltane and then lit a single new fire. They relit all the extinguished fires from this “need fire.”

To create your own need fire ritual, you’ll need to gather the nine sacred woods: birch, rowan, ash, alder, willow, hawthorn, oak, holly, and hazel. If you are unable to all the different types, try to make sure you have at three: oak, ash, and hawthorn.

If you don’t have any open fires to put it, use candles to symbolize your fires. Take either three or nine tapers set them in a row. Light the candles and allow them to burn a while, then put them out, thinking of those things you wish to put out of your life. Now prepare the need fire of nine woods in a fireplace, an outdoor fire ring, or even in a grill on a balcony or patio. Make s wood  bow (as described in the Boy Scout handbook, for example) or get a magnifying glass to set fire to the tinder. The should be allowed to the oak wood first, then to the others. While you light the fire, and as you watch it burn, think of those things you wish to “catch fire” in you life.

Copyright Magenta Griffith Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2003 Page 67

Flashback 2003 Samhain

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Samhain/Halloween

Samhain is the night when the veil between worlds is thinnest. It is a good time to communicate with those who have past away, using a mirror. You will need a large mirror for this. It ought to be big enough to show your whole face at once, and preferably part of your upper body.

At least three days before Samhain, cover the mirror. If possible, fast all day on October 31. If you smoke refain from smoking after sunset.

At midnight, sit or stand before the mirror. Have a small bowl or cup of salt water close to hand. Uncover the mirror, and, several times, softly call the name of the person you wish to contact. Concentrate. After a while you may feel contact with that person, and can speak to him or her and ask questions. You can also invoke your younger or older self with this method. When you are done, thank the person, or yourself, say farewell, then dip your fingers in the salt water and draw a pentagram on the mirror to seal the veil. If at any time the communication becomes troublesome, you can break contact in this manner also.

Copyright Magenta Griffith Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2003 Page 67

Flashback 2001 Beltane

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Beltane honors the sacred marriage of the God and Goddess, whos union will produce the harvets to come. It also celebrates the start of summer in full bloom. For this ritual, gather or purchase wildflowers. With raffia, twine, or string tie the flowers together in long garlands; ten feet in length or longer is perfect. These don’t have to look professionally crafted. They only need to hold together for the purpose of your ritual. When you have completed the garlands, go out to a park or wooded area. Touch the land and its plants and trees with your hands, allowing yourself to connect with the pulsing lifeforce of the area. Look around for items that are either feminine or masculine in their energy, and begin to linking them together with the flowery garlands to honor the union of the divine female and male energies. For example, you can link stones to oak trees, riverbanks to abandoned fire pits, or flowering plants to spikey ones.

Copyright Edain McCoy Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2001 Page 67

Flashback 2001 Samhain

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Samhain/Halloween

In many traditions, Samhain marks the spiritual New Year, a time when we want to focus on our connection to the past and the future. To ancient peoples, stones represent the link between ourselves and those who walked our Earth before us and would do so after us. This is still seen today in the New Year’s rituals in the South Pacific islanders and Jewish cemeteries the world over. To honor those who came before us, gather some interesting stones—large, but small enough to carry comfortably—and take them to any place that makes you feel connected to your ancestors. Graveyards, at home, or a piece of land are all appropriate. Speak out loud your desire to connect with those who once walked in this place and invite them to link more closely with you. Place the stones firmly into the ground, knowing that they will be there always, connecting you to eternity of your family tree from oldest roots to newest buds.

Copyright Edain McCoy Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2001 Page 119

Angel Messages + Goddess Message For the week of 19 October 2020

Goddess power in yo house baby! That’s right!! YEAH! Do you know what this means for you? If you don’t, it’s time to find out! WHOOOP!!

*Hey yall, do something nice today – like and share my videos and then SUBSCRIBE to my YouTube channel 🙂 Thanks for helping me grow this YouTube channel that means so much to me.

🙂 Contact me at v.baltimore@web.de
to get my quality, HAND-MADE, jewelry from Germany for a specified donation, payable through PayPal! Here’s the link: https://witchcraftandmore.com/hand-made-jewelry/

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+ Mantra for this week: I AM Goddess powerful!

Bright Goddess Blessings to you and yours,
The Silver Sage Witch of
Witchcraftandmore.com
PS If you or your loved one needs healing, please let me know and I will send long-distance healing at no cost to you. Let us spread LOVE EVERYWHERE!!

PS. PS. Sorry for my tardiness with your weekly video…the internet in our area was out and I was totally _______________! You can fill in the blank 😉

The Origin of Halloween by Sliver Raven Wolf – Part 6

[This article will alternate days between CovenLife.co and WitchesOfTheCraft.com]

All Saints’ Day / All Hallows Eve / Hallowmas

All Saints’ Day and All Hallows Eve (Halloween) were first introduced in the seventh century CE. This date was changed to November 1 to supplant Pagan beliefs because those pesky Pagans just refused to cough up their original Samhain. The day was to honor God and all his saints, known and unknown All Saints’ Day later became Hallowmas, a mass to honor the dead. The Eve of All Hollow’s Eve, October 31, became All Hollow’s Eve, which evolved in to the word Hallowe’en. Although the church wished this time to be one of somber prayer and quiet custom, the Celts continued their customary bonfires and fortune telling.

All Saints’ Day is a bit different. The festival falls on November 2, a day to offer prayer and alms to assist the souls of those departed that managed to get stuck in purgatory, an in-between place that is neither heaven or hell. Over the succeeding centuries, Halloween like Christmas, picked up various customs and discarded others, depending on the complex socialization of the times and religious dictates.

Copyright Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 1999 Pages 24 to 29

May Day by Jami Shoemaker – Part 2

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Roman Influence

The month of May takes its name from the goddess Maia, who appears in both Greek and Roman mythologies. In Greece, she was “grandmother,” “midwife,” or “wise one” and she was known as the mother of Hermes. The Romans associated her with their fire goddess of the same name who, along with Flora and Feronia, ruled growth and warmth, including sexual desire. Maia’s day was the first of May, and the associations with growth can still be seen in the Christian dedication of the month to Mary, Queen of Flowers.

When Romans came to Britain, they brought with them their own ancient spring rites. The goddess Flora was worshiped as the embodiment of the flowering of all of nature, including human. She was the queen of plants, the goddess of flowers, and the patron of Roman prostitutes. Flora was honored during a week-long festival from April 28–May 3. The Floralia included the gathering of flowers, used in processions, dances, and games. Young raced to see who could be the first to hang a wreath on Flora’s statue, and wrap garlands around the columns of her temple. The female body was especially6 honored at this time. Graphic, erotic medallions were distributed, and public orgies celebrated the fruitfulness of the earth. The “festival of nude women” was celebrates until the third century CE, when Roman authorities demanded the celebrants be clothed. The sense of unrestrained freedom was even enjoyed by Roman slaves on this day, with the stipulation that they return to their mater’s houses that night.

Copyright Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2001 Pages 21 to 25

May Day [Beltane] by Jami Shoemaker – Part 1

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When I was a little girl, my sister and I would celebrate the first of May by making little paper baskets and filling them with candy. We would then sneak around the neighborhood to our friend’s houses, leave them on the doorsteps, ring the bells, and run away, screaming with laughter. The trick was never to reveal your identity to the recipient of the gift. Little did I know at the time that we were celebrating an old custom that harkened back to ancient times.

Origins

Like any celebration based on ancient agricultural practices, it is impossible to know the exact origin of out May Day. Celebrations of spring are found in cultures all over the world, with similar themes of renewal, planting and growth, the gathering of flowers, and playful celebrations.

However, much of the meaning behind modern Pagan custom can be traced to Celtic origins, or at least with attribute to the Celts. We know that they divided the year into two seasons: summer and winter, the dark and life halves of the year. Within this they honored four major turning points, Samhain, Imbolc, Beltane, and Lughnasadh, with fire festivals.

These festivals coincided astrologically with the Sun at 15 degrees Scorpio, Aquarius, Taurus, and Leo, respectively. This made these pivotal points each a type of “moveable” feast originally, like the solstices and equinoxes, which vary by a day or two from year to year. But due to changes in calendars over time, eventually the first day of the months of November, February, May, and August were earmarked for these festivals, evolving into what Witches call the Great Sabbats, with the celebrations commencing at sunset the eve before.

The flexibility in the actual date is followed by some Pagans today, and May Day, or Beltane, celebrations calculated this way are called “Old Beltane.” This explains the custom in ancient Ireland of celebrating the first day of summer on May 6. This day was given to Inghean Bhuidhe, the Yellow-Haired Girl, one of the three sister-goddesses who brought in the seasons: the First of Spring, the First of Summer, and the First Harvest.

The return of the light was called Cetsamhain (“opposite  Samhain”) or Beltaine in Ireland, Galan-Mai in Wales, and in Scotland, Beaultiunn, on the Isle of Man, it was known as Day of Summer and in Germany, Walpurgisnatch. The medieval church renamed the holiday Roodmas, hoping to shift the emphasis from the phallic Maypole to the Holy Rood, or Cross, and celebrations once marked by Pagan frivolity were usurped by festivities held in churchyards.

Copyright Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2001 Pages21 to25

The Origins of Halloween by Silver Raven Wolf – Part 4

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The Advent of Christianity

By the fourth and fifth centuries , Celtic Christianity had oozed into Ireland. St. Patrick has his hands full, and here is where the kettle starts to boil. At, first, the Pagans openly welcomed Christianity, but as Christianity filtered into the Celtic system, church officials had a few problems—mainly the Celtics didn’t want up their holidays or folk practices. The people were not willing to throw out traditions that were ingrained into their social structure. If you can’t get someone to completely change, what do you do? Compromise. And that’s exactly what happened. Samhain was changed to All Hollow’s Eve. To make the Pagan peoples adhere more closely to this new religion of Christianity, the clergy of the day taught the peasants that fairies were really demons and devils (remember, a concept totally unknown to Celtic belief or history) and their beloved dead were horrid ghosts and ghouls. The early Christian erroneously associated the Celtic land of the dead with the Christian concept of Hell.

To help the belief in Christianity along, Druids priestess were systematically murdered. Early Christians also taught the area peasants that their Lord of the Underworld was in fact Satan, which is ridiculous, as the two mythos don’t have anything in common. It appears that Christians misunderstood what the word Samhain meant: because the peasants use this celebration to honor the dead, Christians assumed that Samhain was the incorrect pronunciation of a Pagan deity in the Bible, recorded as Samuel, from the Semitic Sammael, meaning God of the under world.

Copyright Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 1999 Pages 24 to 29

The Origins of Halloween by Silver Raven Wolf – Part 2

(This article will be posted on an alternate day basis between Coven Life and our affiliated website WitchesOfThCraft.com)

The Celts

Many historians feel that the greatest strength in the Celtic people lies in their collective mythos. Wading through the romanticism to find unmodified information can prove a tricky endeavor. The earliest archaeological evidence we have of the Celts rest in France and Western Germany.  The Celtic people moved into Spain, Britain, and Switzerland between the fifth and first century BCE. They even ransacked Rome in 390 BCE.

The Celtic peoples celebrated four festivals called fire festivals–commonly know today as Samhain, Oimelc (Imbolc), Beltane, and Lughnasadh. Samhain (pronounced sow-in, sow rhymes with now) was the first and foremost a harvest festival relating to animal husbandry and preparations for the winter months. Fire is an element of cleaning, a vehicle of eradication, so it is not unlikely that fire would work itself into any type of religious celebration. Fire among the ancient peoples often represented an aspect of the divine.

What does the word Samhain mean? Well, we know what it doesn’t mean. There is no archeological or literary evidence of a Celtic god by the name of Samhain. This little slip of fact appears to have begum in the 1700s and continues in some misinformed publications today. The word Samhain actually means “summers end”.

So, where did this Lord of the Dead thing come in? Over time, Samhain took on a religious significance through ministrations of the Druids (the clergy of the Celt’s). Legends indicate that on Samhain all the hearth fires in Ireland were doused and then lit again from a central fire maintained by the Druids at Tlachtga. To the Celts, Samhain was a turning point from light into darkness, and it was thought that this break or fissure created easier access to their land of the dead, Tir nan Og.

The Druids

We need to know a little bit about the Druids to continue with our history of Halloween. The Druids were versed in all learning and were considered to have the gift of prophecy. They functioned as judge, ambassadors, healers, and religious leaders. The Druids first named the holiday Samhain.

Copyright 1999 Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook Pages 24 to 29