Week 8 – Goddess Knowledge – The Sphinx

The Sphinx is an ancient moon goddess, the goddess of birth and death. Part animal, part human, she remains connected to her deep instinctual nature. Most stories empathize her aspect as a death goddess who carries the dead to the underworld. Often portrayed as a lion, she shares in the solar and regal symbolism of that animal. Her role as an oracular deity, given to enigma and riddles, points to her as the keeper of the great mystery. A symbol of strength, wisdom, and royal power, she reminds us that nothing comes to creation without some destruction and that sometimes to solve a mystery we must enter the darkness. This image reminds us that there is beauty even in the heart of that which terrifies.

More Information on The Sphinx Goddess

Images of Goddess The Sphinx

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Egyptian Afterlife – The Field of Reeds

If  the soul passed through the Weighing of the Heart it moved on to a path which led to Lily Lake (also known as the Lake of Flowers). There are, again, a number of versions of what could happen on this path where, in some, one finds dangers to be avoided and gods to help and guide while, in others, it is an easy walk down the kind of path one would have known back home. At the shore of Lily Lake the soul would meet the Divine Ferryman, Hraf-hef (He-Who-Looks-Behind-Him) who was perpetually unpleasant. The soul would have to find some way to be courteous to Hraf-hef, no matter what unkind or cruel remarks he made, and show one’s self worthy of continuing the journey.

To read the rest of this article copy and paste the following link into your browser: https://www.ancient.eu/article/877/egyptian-afterlife—the-field-of-reeds/

Ancient Egypt God and Goddesses Family Tree

There are many representations of Ancient Egyptian Deities family trees. Here I am showing you just one of many and it contains most of the ancient gods and goddesses.

I got this from bing.com as I have been doing with all the pictures for us to get to Know some of the Egyptian Goddesses and Gods better. Here is the link to the general search I did on there for the family tree. This link will take you to the page where they have the family trees broken down even further for each splinter family group : Ancient Egypt Gods and Goddesses Family Trees

I have enjoyed bring you more information this past week on the Ancient Egyptian Pantheon. If you would like to do more exploring on your own especially for the gods and/or goddesses not presents in the articles here are two very informative sites you should look at Ancient Egypt Online – Religion in Ancient Egypt: The Gods and Goddesses  and/or Ancient Egypt Online – The Ancient Egyptian Gods  Both links also have other information about Ancient Egypt you may find interesting.

 

 

The Places of Sun Worship in Ancient Egypt

The sun god Re, or Ra, was the predominant deity in ancient Egypt. The young sun god begins his dawn voyage in his boat over the ocean of heaven, is full-grown by the moment of the high-noon sun and sets in the west as an old man, the god Atum. By the time of the fifth dynasty, pharaohs were considered to be the divine, direct descendants of the sun god and they built cities and temples to emphasize their divinity.

Monotheism and Akehtaten

Egyptians were polytheistic, with Ra holding pride of place as the chief deity. But Amenhotep, royal consort of the legendary Nefertiti, belonged to a cult that believed the sun god created himself and then brought about the rest of creation and the other gods. Amenhotep embraced monotheism, smashed the idols of the other gods and regarded himself as a distinctive son of Ra, also known as Aten, the “Great Disc” of illumination. The pharaoh built a new capital, a city called Akhetaten, and changed his name to Akhenaten in honor of Ra. When he died, Tutankhamen, his successor, was faced with a catastrophic economic collapse and severe unrest, partly attributable to the suppressed traditional religion. King Tut restored the rest of the gods to their temples and to active worship and Akhetaten was abandoned, eventually buried under the desert sand.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Ra – Sun God

Ra

Ra is the ancient Egyptian sun god. He is the father of the gods and is usually depicted with the body of a human and the head of a falcon.

The ancient Egyptians revered Ra as the god who created everything. Also known as the Sun God, Ra was a powerful deity and a central god of the Egyptian pantheon. The ancient Egyptians worshiped Ra more than any other god and pharaohs often connected themselves with Ra in their efforts to be seen as the earthly embodiment of the Sun God.

Ra | The Sun God of Egypt

The ancient Egyptians revered Ra as the god who created everything. Also known as the Sun God, Ra was a powerful deity and a central god of the Egyptian pantheon. The ancient Egyptians worshiped Ra more than any other god and pharaohs often connected themselves with Ra in their efforts to be seen as the earthly embodiment of the Sun God.

Who is Ra?

Ra (pronounced ray) represents sunlight, warmth and growth. It was only natural that the ancient Egyptians would believe him to be the creator of the world, as well as part of him being represented in every other god. The ancient Egyptians believed that every god should illustrate some aspect of him, while Ra himself should also represent every god.

Ra’s Appearance

Ra was usually depicted in human form. He had a falcon head which is crowned with a sun disc. This sun disc was encircled by a sacred cobra named Uraeus. Ra has also been depicted as a man with the head of a beetle and also a human man with the head of a ram. The ancients also depicted Ra in full species form such as a serpent, heron, bull, lion, cat, ram, hawk, beetle, phoenix and others. His main symbol, however, is the sun disk.

To read the rest of this article please click on the blue name of RA at the beginning of this post.

Ra

Ra (Re) was the primary name of the sun god of Ancient Egypt. He was often considered to be the King of the Gods and thus the patron of the pharaoh and one of the central gods of the Egyptian pantheon. He was also described as the creator of everything. Ra was so powerful and popular and his worship was so enduring that some modern commentators have argued that the Egyptian religion was in fact a form of veiled monotheism with Ra as the one god. This seems to be somewhat of an overstatement, but underlines his primary position within religious texts throughout Egyptian history.

It is sometimes proposed that the pyramids represent the rays of light extending from the sun and thus these great monuments connected the king with Ra. The Egyptians also built solar temples in honour of Ra. Unlike the standard type of Egyptian temple, these temples were open to the sunlight and did not feature a statue of the god because he was represented by the sunlight itself. Instead the temple centred on an obelisk and altar. The most significant early solar temple is thought to be the one erected in Heliopolis, sometimes known as “Benu-Phoenix”. Its location was thought to be the spot where Ra first emerged at the beginning of creation, and the city took its name (“Iwn”) from the word for a pillar.

To read the rest of this article about Ra please click on this link: RA

Bastet or Bast

Did You Know?
While there are many lion gods and cat goddesses in ancient Egyptian religion, Bastet is the only god or goddess represented as a domestic cat.
Considered as the goddess of warfare in Lower Egypt, ‘Bast’ was known as ‘Sekhmet’ in Upper Egypt, who was also a lioness deity of warfare. However, during the Third Intermediate Period and by the 22nd Dynasty or Bubastite Dynasty (945-715 BCE), this goddess began to be depicted with the head of a cat instead of a lioness. Additionally, she came to be known as ‘Bastet’ a powerful protector deity.
For more interesting facts about Bastet please click on this link: Bastet Facts

Bastet or Bast

Bastet, or Bast, was a cat goddess and the patroness of pregnant women. She loved music and dance which made her festival at Bubastis one of the most popular festivals in Egypt. According to records, her festivals had as many as 700,000 attendees. The Egyptians regarded Bastet as the personification of the sun’s beneficial powers. Her depictions show her as either a woman with a cat’s head or as a cat and people mummified cats in her honor.

To read a general description of Bast and other important Ancient Egyptian deities lease click on the following link: Bastet