The Sacred Sex and Death Rites of the Ancient Mystery Groves

In most of the civilised world, at least as far back as 5,000 years ago, there were women shamans or priestesses who represented the godhead in sacred sex rites and, in ancient Greece, they were known as hierodules.

A hierodule would have skills similar to the shaman in that she could journey, in trance, into other dimensions, and merge with her spirit lover  there.  Part of the hierodule’s role was to spend the night with a newly crowned king or queen, and while embodying her spirit lover, she would transfer the Sovereignty of the Land to the royal personage in sexual initiation.

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The Meaning of the Four Directions in Native American Culture

As part of the Lakota culture, when people pray or do anything sacred, they see the world as having Four Directions. From these Four Directions — north, east, south, west — come the four winds. The special meanings of each of the Four Directions are accompanied by specific colors, and the shape of the cross symbolizes all directions. Like many Native American beliefs and traditions, specific details regarding colors associated with directions varies.

East (Yellow)

The direction from which the sun comes. Light dawns in the morning and spreads over the earth. This is the beginning of a new day. It is also the beginning of understanding because light helps us see things the way they really are. On a deeper level, east stands for the wisdom helping people live good lives. Traditional people rise in the morning to pray facing the dawn, asking God for wisdom and understanding.

To read about the rest of the directions please click on this link: Native American 4 Directions

Medicine Ways: Traditional Healers and Healing (Native American)

The Medicine Wheel and the Four Directions

The Medicine Wheel, sometimes known as the Sacred Hoop, has been used by generations of various Native American tribes for health and healing. It embodies the Four Directions, as well as Father Sky, Mother Earth, and Spirit Tree—all of which symbolize dimensions of health and the cycles of life.

The Medicine Wheel can take many different forms. It can be an artwork such as artifact or painting, or it can be a physical construction on the land. Hundreds or even thousands of Medicine Wheels have been built on Native lands in North America over the last several centuries.

Movement in the Medicine Wheel and in Native American ceremonies is circular, and typically in a clockwise, or “sun-wise” direction. This helps to align with the forces of Nature, such as gravity and the rising and setting of the Sun.

Meanings of the Four Directions

To read this rest of this article please click on this link: Native American Medicine Wheel and 4 Directions

Witchcraft with Fairies; Walking the Wild Woods

Here is no protective circle, no prayers, no names of power; we have left the strained company of the magicians and are back in the countryside where the fairies are natural company.” – K. Briggs, in The Anatomy of Puck chapter 8, discussing a folk ritual to obtain a fairy companion.

There is a long history of witches working with fairies in various ways, both learning from them and being in service to them. In modern paganism we more often see this relationship played out very differently, with the Good Folk being approached from a more ceremonial magic perspective or treated as a kind of spirit guide or ally. When we look to folklore and early modern witchcraft we see a different  picture and it is this one that I base my own personal practice on.

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Sprites, Faeries and Pixies

The BeginningThey are called the Fae, fay, faeries, sprites and pixies. Are they the same thing? Are there separate variations or species? What are they exactly? Where do they live? Who believes in them and how do they communicate with them? The best place to start this topic is with spellings and definitions. There are several spellings used throughout the world and spiritual community for faeries. Fairy and faerie are the two most common, but they can also be described as fay or fae. Pixie, leprechaun, faerie, brownie, sprite are all terms for these supernatural beings, thought to be helpful or harmful to people.

To read the rest of this authors opinoins on Fea Folk please click on this link: Fea Folk

When Artemis Aims, When Artemis Calls

Artemis was the first goddess to call to me. She was between the branches and in the shuffle of leaves. And she called to me to a lake in British Columbia.

She called me in story and song and clear night sky.

Artemis inspired me during a Reclaiming Witchcamp in 2015. And I saw Orion in the space above my house before I left to join the group of teachers.

To join the witches.

To join the space between and beyond time.

To join the hunt for our hearts.

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Hearth of Hellenism: How Are We Equals with the Gods?

The article I wrote in August, Freedom from Spiritual Slavery,left a bad taste in the mouths of some of my readers. I was charged with being hubris when I wrote that we “approach the gods as equals” in worship. The article was a complaint against contemporary Orthodox Christian behavior and its incompatibility with Hellenism. In Orthodox Christianity, humans are called servants/slaves (δοῦλος/doulos) of God. This is against the principles of Hellenism to think of yourself as a slave to any God because of your human nature.

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CHOOSE YOUR DEITY: THE GODS & GODDESSES OF SNOW

We had our first snowfall in the Chicagoland area of Illinois, USA. So I figured it was time to introduce a variety of SNow or Frost Goddesses and Gods. Has anyone else gotten snow yet? If you have please tell us whereby country or an area of the state you live in. Please do not put your exact town/village/city in the comment for safety reasons. Thank you! HAppy snowperson building!!! The list below is from many different countries and traditions. I will post some pictures of our snowfall here as soon as I get them from cell/mobile phone to my computer. Mother Earth looked like a beautiful wonderland to me this morning :0}

Posted by  | Aug 23, 2016 

It’s the end of August, and the gods and goddesses of snow are starting to stir in their beds. This past weekend snow was in the forecast for the higher elevations of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado. Yes, boys and girls, it’s coming.

‘Gods and goddesses?’ you say. ‘I thought it was all about Ullr!’

Well, not really. Sure, the Nordic deity is the one who gets all the press. Even the most staunch unbelievers aren’t shy about trying all sorts of things to get him to deliver snow during ski season. But Ullr isn’t the only god of  snow out there. Plenty of other cultures have them, too. So if you want to hedge your bets, here are a few others you might want to direct your attention to:

Chione (Khione): The goddess of snow in Greek mythology. Chione was a daughter of Boreas, god of the wintry north wind. She was also the consort of Poseidon, god of the sea.

Itztlacoliuhqui, Aztec god of snow.

Itztlacoliuhqui: No, I have no idea how this is pronounced, but the Aztecs had a god of snow, who was also the god of frost, ice, cold, winter, sin, punishment and human misery. Illustrations show his face as a piece of finely curved black obsidian. Some say this reflects his blindness to the hardship inflicted on farmers by a bad, crop-destroying frost. According to legend, Itztlacoliuhqui started off life as the god Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli (Lord of the Dawn, Venus) who, after a shooting match with the Sun God Tonatiuh, was punished and transformed into Itztlacoliuhqui, the god of stone and coldness — which is why it’s always cold at dawn.

To look at the rest of the list this author shared please click on this link: Goddesses and Gods of Snow

Salem & The Magick of Halloween Costumes

There is perhaps no other holiday so closely tied to wearing costumes as Samhain or Halloween. In Mickie Mueller’s Little Book of Halloween, she traces the tradition of costume wearing and trick-or-treating and how they were introduced by Pagans and kept alive despite the Christian Church’s transformation of Samhain into All Souls’ Day in an attempt to divert the people’s attention from pagan practices of honoring the deceased ancestors. She writes that:

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