Link to General Search for the Threefold Law

If you would like to learn more from different standpoints concerning the Threefold Law, which is also known as The Rule of Three, please click on the following link: General Search for the Threefold Law

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THE WICCAN THREEFOLD LAW

Also known as “the Rule of Three,” the Threefold Law is part of many, but not all Wiccan traditions. It states that every magical act sent out into the Universe—whether positive or negative—will be returned to the Witch three times. This is somewhat akin to the concept of karma found in some Eastern religions, but with a Western twist, as it applies a specific equation (“three times”) to the return of the energy sent out by the practitioner.

Just what does “three times” mean, however? Some people believe that the magical work will be returned in three individual instances. For example, if you worked a harmful spell against someone you dislike, you could end up experiencing bad luck on three different occasions (a car breakdown, a horrible day at work, and burning your dinner, to name three random possibilities). Others interpret “three times” to be a multiplier, meaning that the consequences for you will be three times stronger than the intention you sent out. So you might end up with far worse luck than car trouble or a bad day!

The origins of the Threefold Law are a bit murky, but the idea is generally traced back to Gerald Gardner, who raised it in his early fictional work about Witchcraft, but did not include it as a major part of his teachings. Later Witches who learned from Gardner’s initiates—most notably Raymond Buckland—brought the concept into more widespread awareness. It is also referred to in the long poem known as the Wiccan Rede, which contains adages and advice regarding magical traditions and spiritual beliefs.

Nonetheless, there were many others involved in the origins of Wicca who did not encounter teachings on …

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Threefold Law

The Wiccan Three-Fold Law

“Ever mind the rule of three,
What ye send out comes back to thee.”

The Three-Fold Law is not only a Wiccan law. And it’s not dependent on an All-Knowing God watching and meting out punishment.Far worse than that! It is one of the essential threads of the universe … the very fabric of which life is made.So no matter what you do, you can’t sidestep it.Best to really understand it, then, so you can use it to your advantage and get the Universe working for you. After all, don’t you want to be on the Divine’s good side? Be aware of the Three-Fold Law and you can get — and keep — the Universe on your team!

Religious Rule or Universal Law?

The Three-Fold Law is one of the basics of Wiccan belief.Despite the name, the Three-Fold Law isn’t a Wiccan law, exactly, but rather a universal spiritual principle. We call it a law, I think, because in our respect-deficient culture we associate laws with punishment, and ….

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Three Fold Law

 

Paganism & Neo-Paganism

The words ‘Paganism’ and ‘Pagan’ come from the Latin ‘paganus,’ meaning ‘country dweller. In simplest terms – Paganism is a religion of place, or a native religion, for example the Native American’s religion is Pagan, Hinduism is a form of Paganism. All Pagan religions are characterized by a connection and reverence for nature, and are usually polytheistic i.e. have many Gods and/or Goddesses.

Paganism is a religion of nature, in other words Pagans revere Nature. Pagans see the divine as immanent in the whole of life and the universe; in every tree, plant, animal and object, man and woman and in the dark side of life as much as in the light. Pagans live their lives attuned to the cycles of Nature, the seasons, life and death.

Unlike the patriarchal religions (Christianity, Islam, Judaism) the divine is female as well as male and therefore there is a Goddess as well as a God. These deities are within us as well as without us (immanent); they are us.

To read the rest of this article please either copy and paste this link into your browser or click on the link: http://www.crystalinks.com/paganism.html

Áine – Midsummer’s Celtic Faerie Goddess

Áine was both a Celtic Goddess and a Faerie Queen. She has been known by other names, such as the Lady of the Lake, the Goddess of the Earth and Nature, and the Goddess of Luck and Magick. As well, there are some people who actually believe that she might be an aspect of The Morrigan.

Áine was one of the most beautiful, feminine, and powerful Celtic goddesses and was one of the many goddesses that the Christian monks sought to do away with, mostly because of her many relations with men. Because of this Aine is not heard much of in the bardic literature, but she is still very prominent in the folk-lore of the neighborhood. She is known in some parts of Ireland as the Fairy Queen of Munster. Also, in the Irish legends we find in her son Earl an archetype of Lancelot in the later Arthurian legends, while Aine Herself is the Lady of the Lake.

In Celtic mythology, Áine (“awnya”) is a goddess of summer, wealth, sovereignty, love, growth and cattle. She is a Sun Goddess and the feast of Midsummer Night was held in her honor, for at midsummer, farmers would walk through their fields and wave their torches, in the hope that Áine and her sacred fire might grant them an abundant harvest. They also burnt flowers and straw, as another way of honoring Áine, in the hope that she might grant them freedom from illness and evil throughout another turn of the Wheel of the Year. She is sometimes represented by a red mare.

Áine is symbolized by brightness, glow, joy, radiance, splendor, glory, magic, popularity and even fame. She is sometimes mistakenly equaled to Danu, because her name is somewhat similar to Anu. However, these are not the same Goddess.

To read the rest of this article please click on the following link: Áine – Midsummer’s Celtic Faerie Goddess

Áine, the Faery Goddess

Áine of Knockainy, Ain Cliach, Ain of the Light, Áine N’Chliar, Ain Cliar the Bright

  • Áine (ON-ya) is an Irish Goddess of summer, love, protection, fertility, wealth and sovereignty.
  • In her role of Moon Goddess, she guards livestock, crops, and cattle.
  • In her role as Sun Goddess, she could take the form of ‘Lair Derg’, a red mare that no one could outrun, in order to walk among her people.
  • Also known as a Faery Queen and Love Goddess, she has been known by other names such as the Lady of the Lake, the Goddess of the Earth and Nature, the Goddess of Luck and Magick, and Leanan Sidhe (“Sweetheart of the Sidhe”)
  • Áine is thought to mean “brightness, glow, joy, radiance, splendour, glory, fame”.
  • She is associated with Midsummer (Litha, Summer Solstice), however also has sacred days following Lughnasadh.
  • She is associated with the Sun and Moon, the element Air, the direction South West, and one of the sacred herbs of Druids, Meadowsweet.
  • Her sacred animals are the red mare, rabbit, and swan.
  • She is associated with the Irish Province of Munster, specifically County Limerick, where the hill of Knockainy (Cnoc Áine) is found.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Aine – Fairy Goddess

Images Of and More Information on The Dagda

The Dagda is known in different ways to the different tribes of Celtic people. I only scratched the surface when reading about him. So if he interests you I would definitely click on the general search link to find out more because he is an interesting god capable of many things.

Here is the link for the general search I used for information on this God: The Dagda – General Search

Here is the link to bing.com to see more Images of The Dagda: The Dagda – Images

The Dagda, Father of All

  • The Dagda is a powerful Irish god, also known as Eochaid Ollathair (“All Father”), Ruad Rofhessa(“Lord of Great Knowledge”), or Lord of the Heavens.
  • His name means “good”, and is known as the god of protection, warriors, knowledge, the arts, magic, music, initiation, prophecy, weather, reincarnation, death, fire, the sun, healing, regeneration, prosperity and plenty.
  • Sources vary in terms of his family members.  In some sources, his father is Elatha and his mother is Ethniu/ Eithne.  Also Danu is either seen as his mother or his daughter, probably due to his association with Brigid.
  • The Dagda is thought to be the father of Bodb Dearg, Aed Minbhrec/Aed Cáem, Cermait Milbél, Midir, and daughters Áine, and Brigid.  He was also the father or brother of Oghma.
  • Through his affair with Bóand/ Bóann, he fathered a daughter Breg and son Óengus/Aengus /Angus Óg.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: The Dagda, Father of All

The Dagda, Father God of Ireland

In Irish legend, the Dagda is an important father figure deity. He is a powerful figure who wields a giant club that can both kill and resurrect men. The Dagda was the leader of the Tuatha de Danaan, and a god of fertility and knowledge. His name means “the good god.”

In addition to his mighty club, the Dagda also possessed a large cauldron. The cauldron was magical in that it had an endless supply of food in it — the ladle itself was said to be so large that two men could lie in it. The Dagda is typically portrayed as a plump man with a large phallus, representative of his status as a god of abundance.

The Dagda held a position as a god of knowledge as well. He was revered by many Druid priests, because he bestowed wisdom upon those who wished to learn. He had an affair…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: The Dagda, Father God of Ireland