Tracing the Origins of the Infamous Ouija Board

The Ouija board (known also as a Spirit board or Talking board) is a type of board commonly believed to enable its users to communicate with the spirit world. A Ouija board usually has the letters of the alphabet inscribed onto it, the numbers 0 – 9, along with words such as ‘yes’, ‘no’, and ‘goodbye’. In addition to the board itself, each Ouija includes a planchette, a teardrop-shaped device with three legs. The planchette is normally made of wood or plastic, and usually has either a hole in its middle or a kind of pointer. For the Ouija to operate, two or more people should be seated around the board, with their fingertips placed on the planchette. A question is then asked, and the planchette apparently seema to move on its own, thus providing an answer.

Spiritualism

Although the practice of obtaining messages from seemingly supernatural things is almost as old humanity itself, the Ouija board is arguably a more modern divination object. Some sources have argued that Pythagoras put forth talking boards in 540 BC and others have likened them to ancient writing devices from China, but most of these beliefs fall flat when their original sources cannot be found, or, the stories are found to have been created as a form of publicity or based on misinformation.

Talking boards are known instead to have their origins in a movement known as Spiritualism…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: http://www.ancient-origins.net/history/tracing-origins-infamous-ouija-board-005898?nopaging=1

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The Origins of the Faeries: Changes in Conscious Perception – Part II

The faeries appear in folklore from all over the world as metaphysical beings, who, given the right conditions, are able to interact with the physical world. They’re known by many names but there is a conformity to what they represent, and perhaps also to their origins.

[Read Part I]

In his 2005 book Supernatural, Graham Hancock puts forward the hypothesis that the shamanistic cultures of the Stone Age were also interacting with these beings. Around 40,000 years ago there was an explosion of symbolism in human cultures throughout the world, primarily represented by cave art. This cave art is usually located in hard to access underground spaces that must have had significant meaning for the artists and those who would have been experiencing these strange images by firelight. And strange they are. Much of the cave art represents therianthropic beings, that is half human, half animal shape-shifters.

There are also many beings that seem to be distorted humans, often similar to the faeries of folklore. And this gets to the core of the subject. Hancock makes the convincing argument that these cave paintings were produced to represent reality as perceived in an altered state of consciousness. Twenty years ago this idea was anathema to anthropologists, but since the work of the anthropologists David Lewis-Williams, Thomas Dowson and many others, the theory has tipped over to become an accepted orthodoxy. There are motifs by the hundred in the cave paintings that correlate with the visionary states of people in an altered state of consciousness, brought about most especially by the ingestion of a psychotropic substance.

The basic premise is that the shamans of these stone age cultures transported themselves into…

To read this rest of this and see the pictures please click on this link: Fairies 2

The Origins of the Faeries: Encoded in our Cultures – Part I

The faeries appear in folklore from all over the world as metaphysical beings, who, given the right conditions, are able to interact with the physical world. They’re known by many names but there is a conformity to what they represent, and perhaps also to their origins. From the Huldufólk in Iceland to the Tuatha Dé Danann in Ireland, and the Manitou of Native Americans, these are apparently intelligent entities that live unseen beside us, until their occasional manifestations in this world become encoded into our cultures through folktales, anecdotes and testimonies.

In his 1691 treatise on the faeries of Aberfoyle, Scotland, the Reverend Robert Kirk suggested they represented a Secret Commonwealth, living in a parallel reality to ours, with a civilization and morals of their own, only visible to seers and clairvoyants. His assessment fits well with both folktale motifs, and some modern theories about their ancient origins and how they have permeated the collective human consciousness. So who are the faeries, where do they come from…and what do they want?

Faerie-tales…

To read the rest and see pictures please click on this link: Fairies

History of Ostara – The Spring Equinox

MANY HOLIDAYS, MANY NAMES

The word Ostara is just one of the names applied to the celebration of the spring equinox on March 21. The Venerable Bede said the origin of the word is actually from Eostre, a Germanic goddess of spring. Of course, it’s also the same time as the Christian Easter celebration, and in the Jewish faith, Passover takes place as well. For early Pagans in the Germanic countries, this was a time to celebrate planting and the new crop season.

Typically, the Celtic peoples did not celebrate Ostara as a holiday, although they were in tune with the changing of the seasons.

According to History.com, “At the ruins of Chichen Itza, the ancient Maya city in Mexico, crowds now gather on the spring (and fall) equinox to watch as the afternoon sun creates shadows that resemble a snake moving along the stairs of the 79-foot-tall Pyramid of Kukulkan,…

To Rest the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/history-of-ostara-the-spring-equinox-2562485

Witchcraft by Encyclopedia.com

Witchcraft

The word “witchcraft” derives from the Saxon wicca, some-times translated as “wise person” but more accurately derived from an Indo-European root, “weik,” that produced words in various Western languages related to magic, religion, and divination. Currently, the word is used to designate a variety of very different but vaguely related phenomena including, but not limited to, (1) the magical/religious practitioners in a variety of third world pre-industrial societies; (2) the Satanism described in the anti-witchcraft books beginning in the late fifteenth century in Europe; (3) the Neopagan followers of Wicca,the religion started by Gerald B. Gardner in the 1940s; and (4) individuals (primarily female) who are reputed to have psychic abilities.

Interpretations of Historic Witchcraft…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Witchcraft

Bubbling Brews and Broomsticks: How Alewives Became the Stereotypical Witch

“Brewing”, “herbs,” “broomsticks,” “woman.” When one hears these words together, most often the assumption is that the person in question is a witch. Yet brewing has a very human meaning as well, one that revolves around the avarice of alcohol and its never-ending demand by consumers. It was from this alcoholic context that the trade of alewives arose, women in the Middle Ages through the early modern period who brewed and sold alcohol as a means of income. Due to the alewives’ skills in the kitchen, fashion sense, and the eventual rise of urban guilds, however, the alewife soon became a term synonymous with “witch.” It is likely from these practices that much of the modern views of the stereotypical witch began.

Brewing Was For Women

Brewing belonged to women from the medieval to early modern periods for a variety of reasons. The most obvious is the simple fact that women were tasked with proper kitchen chores, and brewing required many of them. Women kept the kitchen in order, made dough and baked bread; they planted and grew herbs, ground grains and boiled ingredients in a large black cauldron over a sweltering fire for stews. The practice, therefore, was rather economic for women to undertake. They already possessed the skills and tools needed to begin make ale and beer. Further, as there was no shortage in the need for alcoholic beverages (as it was the primary drink in a period when water was unclean), the process was beneficial to the family of the brewer as well.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Alewives to Witches

Celtic Meanings of the Five Fold Symbol

Celtic Five Fold Symbol Meaning

This page is devoted to the CelticMeanings within the Five Fold Symbol (symbol shown at top. The center green circle represents the fifth element.)

Celtic meanings surrounding the five-fold motif are fascinating and their significance far-reaching. Specifically, I’m completely enchanted by the fifth element, and how it’s translated by the ancient Celtic mind.

love the idea of integration in the five-fold symbols. The idea is not exclusivelyTo read the rest of this article please click on this link: Celtic 5 Fold Symbol

Imbolc in the Southern Hemisphere

by Jenwytch

POSTED ON JULY 20, 2010 BY JENWYTCH AT THE OTHER SIDE. THIS ARTICLE IS ALSO IN THE JULY 2010 EDITION OF THE “AXIS MUNDI”.

Imbolc is a cross-quarter day midway between the winter solstice (Yule) and the spring equinox (Ostara) and is the celebration of the banishing of winter, the imminent arrival of Spring and the stirring of new life in the earth. Imbolc recognizes the maiden aspect of the triple goddess – the fresh, the young, the naïve, the new – and is strongly connected with the Goddess Brigid. It is associated with and also known as the festivals of Oimelc, Imbolg, Imbolic (Irish), Candlemas (British), Feast of Torches, Lupercalia (Italian/Latin), Brigid’s Day, and Brigantia (Scottish).

Here in the southern hemisphere, in 21st century Australia, we are far removed from the climate and rural lifestyles of the people of ancient Europe where this festival, and others that make up the Wheel Of The Year, originated.

Due to the 6 month offset of the seasons between the northern and southern hemispheres …

To read this rest of this article please click on this link: Imbolc in the Southern Hemisphere

Wiccan Holidays in the Southern Hemisphere

What is the Wheel of the Year, or Wiccan holidays, for those in the Southern Hemisphere?

It gets a little tricky, since Wicca was created in the Northern Hemisphere. Since it’s a nature religion, an Earth religion, this makes a big difference.

After all, a Midsummer ritual in the North happens in June.

In the South, though, this is midwinter!

So what does a Southern Witch do?

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Southern hemisphere Witch’s Holidays

Southern Hemisphere Sabbat Dates

Traditional Dates ‘Exact’ Times & Dates **
Lughnasadh/Lammas February 2 February 4, 2017 1:27AM
Mabon (Autumnal Equinox) March 21 March 20, 2017 8:29PM
Samhain April 30/May 1 May 5, 2017 5:28PM
Yule (Winter Solstice) June 21 June 21, 2017 2:24PM
Imbolc August 1 August 7, 2017 5:40PM
Ostara (Vernal/Spring Equinox) September 21 September 23, 2017 6:02AM
Beltaine October 31 November 7, 2017 3:25PM
Litha (Summer Solstice) December 21 December 22, 2017 2:28AM
** Exact dates and times are from http://www.archaeoastronomy.com/2017.html – Equinox and Solstice data from the U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington DC. Cross-Quarter moments are interpolated as the midway points between the Solstices and Equinoxes measured in degrees along the ecliptic. Former NASA scientist Rollin Gillespie uses this spatial method rather than simply splitting in half the time interval between a Solstice and an Equinox.)

The Wheel of the Year…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Southern Hemisphere Holiday Dates 2017