WEEK 12 – Goddess Knowledge – The Bird Goddess/Valkyrie

The Bird Goddess is one of the most ancient goddesses, both a living-giving creator and goddess of death and regeneration. The Valkyrie, a northern European goddess, is a representation of this goddess as death wielder, The bird guise of the Valkyrie is that of a raven, long associated with death and magic. The name Valkyrie means “chooser of the slain”; the face and form of the Valkyrie are the last thing a person sees before death, Valkyries are the psychopomps who lead the soul to the afterworld. For ancient people death was part of a cyclical process leading again to rebirth; black was a positive color, a symbol of fertility and abundance, The Valkyrie represents that part of us that is unafraid of dark places; she can lead into and through them. She reminds us that seeds germinate in the darkness, that sometimes we need darkness in order to grow.

More Information on The Bird Goddess

Images of The Bird Goddess

Week 11 – Goddess Knowledge – Selene

Selene, Queen of the starlit Heavens, is the ancient Greek goddess of the moon. She carries the moon across the sky in a white chariot driven by winged horses or bulls. She is the totality of the moon, with its waxing into fullness and waning into darkness. Selene fell in love with a mortal, Endymion. When she descended to earth to join Endymion, he fell into a deep sleep from which he has never awoken, Selene continues t visit him nightly.

IN later Greek mythology Selene represented the full moon, while Artemis represented the crescent or waxing moon and Hecate the waning and dark moon; hence Selene is Phoebe, meaning “bright, shining”. She is traditionally represented with the crescent moon as a diadem. Selene represents the fullness of life, incorporating all phases of light and darkness in her shining.

More Information on Goddess Selene

Images of Goddess Selene

Week – 10 Goddess Knowledge – Sedna

SEDNA

Sedna (“the one down there”) was a once beautiful Eskimo woman who lived with her father. None of the local suitors appealed to her, and she refused to marry until a fulmar (a type of bird) from across the sea promised to take her to his home of luxury. When she found she had been deceived and was ill-treated, she begged her father to take her home. As the two were crossing the water, a flock of fulmars caused a huge storm to arise. To save his own life, Sedna’s father threw her into the ocean. As she clung to the boat, he chopped off her fingers, which turned into whales, seals, and all the mammals of the sea. Sedna descended to Adlivum, the Eskimo underworld, where she now rules the dead. To ensure that she will continue to send food to the hunters, shamans descend to visit her, comb her hair, and massage her mutilated hands. Sedna is a reminder of nourishing gifts that are to be found in the deep in the dark, cold places that we most fear.

More Information about Goddess Sedna

Images of Goddess Sedna

Who Are the Wiccan Horned God and Triple Goddess?

The Horned God and Triple Goddess are generally the deities you’ll hear people associate with Wicca, but these very same concepts generate a lot of confusion. You’ll read a lot of books that will tell you the Horned God is like this, or the Triple Goddess is like that. There are a lot of oversimplifications and generalizations going on with these descriptions. Many Wiccan sources also refer to the Lord and Lady as well, or “The” God, and “The” Goddess (the article “the” implying they’re specific deities). This leaves people to wonder— to whom, exactly, are we referring when we use these terms?

Wicca, being a 20th century religion, is fairly unique in one way: we don’t actually have our own deities. That is, our religion wasn’t built around veneration of any specific deities of our own—we worship Pagan Gods and Goddesses of other ancient cultures in a new and modern world. We do not have our own unique pantheon, nor do we believe our religion was revealed to us by deities.

So, who are these characters, then, that you’ll find peppered throughout Wiccan books and websites? Who is the Horned God or the Lord or the God? Who is the Triple Goddess, the Lady or the Goddess? Let’s have a look.

Written by:
Mackenzie Sage Wright

 A Wiccan of 25 years, Sage likes to put her background as a writer and teacher to use by helping people learn about this NeoPagan path.
To read the rest of this informative article please click on this link: Horned God and Triple Goddess

Week 9 – Goddess Knowledge – Triple Goddess

Before I share what is on the Goddess Knowledge Card I wanted to share my favorite image of the Triple Goddess. In most witchcraft traditions there is some representation of this goddess.

Triple Goddess

The Triple Goddess, the original trinity, symbolizes the three faces of the Great Goddess and its earliest representation of her division into multiplicity. The goddess with three faces is a universal motif, found worldwide.The Triple Goddess is intimately associated with changing phases of the moon; just as the moon transforms from one phase to another, the Great Goddess moves among her many rolls. Her three faces usually virgin, mother, and crone: virgin representing the strong, well-defined goddess; mother representing the nurturing goddess as source of all nourishment; and crone representing the goddess of death and transformation. This symbolism embraces the roll of the goddess in all phases of existence from birth through death to rebirth. The Triple Goddess reminds us of our sacredness regardless of our age or function in life. She reminds us that despite her many forms there is one goddess, always present and always sacred.

For More Information About Triple Godess

Images of Triple Goddess

 

Week 8 – Goddess Knowledge – The Sphinx

The Sphinx is an ancient moon goddess, the goddess of birth and death. Part animal, part human, she remains connected to her deep instinctual nature. Most stories empathize her aspect as a death goddess who carries the dead to the underworld. Often portrayed as a lion, she shares in the solar and regal symbolism of that animal. Her role as an oracular deity, given to enigma and riddles, points to her as the keeper of the great mystery. A symbol of strength, wisdom, and royal power, she reminds us that nothing comes to creation without some destruction and that sometimes to solve a mystery we must enter the darkness. This image reminds us that there is beauty even in the heart of that which terrifies.

More Information on The Sphinx Goddess

Images of Goddess The Sphinx

Week 7 – Goddess Knowledge – Eagle Woman

Despite the fact that the life-giving and death-wielding Bird Goddess is one of the oldest representations of the goddess, eagles have usually been linked with the masculine, with a few exceptions (the Sphinx of Egypt had the wings of an eagle, and the Aztec goddess Cihuacoatl was also called Eagle Woman). This Eagle Woman shows a new marriage of the feminine and the eagle. SHe represents all an eagle stands for: spirit, valor, majesty, renewal, accuracy of sight, spiritual aim, and the ability to soar to the heights. She also holds in her hands a vessel, the traditional symbol for the feminine, for that which receives, contains, and nourishes. Here both sets of values are joined, emblematic of a different combinations of strengths that are part of women-born.

Eagle Woman is a joyful affirmation of our ability to break out of millennia-old stereotypes and find new definition the embraces our entire continuum of being alive. She teaches the women can express qualities of the eagle while continuing to contain and nurture.

For more information about the Goddess Eagle Woman please click on this link: Informaton about Eagle Woman

To see images of Eagle WOmen please click on this link: Images of Eagle Woman

Week 6 – Goddess Knowledge – Pele

Pele is the fiery Hawaiian volcano goddess. The daughter of the earth goddess Haimea, Pele came to Hawaii on a boat. Killed in a fight with her sister, the ocean, sho took refuge in the glowing cauldron of Mount Kilauea (this is the volcano that had the major eruption in July 2018 – a link will be below) where she receives the souls of the dead and regenerates them with fire. In a tempestuous relationship with Kamapua`a the ferocious pig god,  she is portrayed as a jealous goddess, her rages manifesting as volcanic eruptions. Revered by Hawaiians even today, she carries the force of the volcano, with its molten lava flow, which even in destrud=ction creates new land. Pele stands for the molten, fierce aspect of life that is unable to do anything halfway. She reminds us that even in the midst of fiery eruption there s creation and new life.

More Information About Pele

Images Of Pele

More Information on Pele’s Home – Mount Kilauea, Hawaii

Week 5 – Goddess Knowledge – Flora

Flora, “Flourishing one,” was the Roman goddess of flowers, gardens, and spring. She is the embodiment of all nature; her name has come to represent all plant life. She is especially a goddess of flowers, including the flower of youth. Her festival of unrestrained pleasure, the Floralia, was celebrated at the end of April and beginning of May; this festival was probably the orgin of the maypole dance and the gathering of bouquets of flowers, symbolizing the bring of spring and new life into the world. She gives charm to youth, aroma to wine, sweetness to honey, and fragrance to blossoms.

Flora teaches us to honor growing things, both inside and outside us, She is a reminder to pay attention to pleasure, to the beauty of spring, and to new life, where it is found.

For more information about Flora click on this link for a general search: Information about Goddess Flora

To see images of the Goddess Flora click on this link: Images of Goddess Flora

A Thought for Today

As Witches or Pagans we do not need four walls, a roof, doors, and Windows to make our church. All we need is a quite place in nature be it our yard, a forest, by a body of water even if it is just a small trickling creek, etc. Or a place in our home to sent up a permanent or even a non-permanent altar to ask a Goddess and/or God to hear our prayers, help us work a magickal spell and/or ritual.

We do not need a book of specific songs to sing to or about our deities. All we need is our voice and to allow ourselves to sing or chant whatever words come to us to let a Goddess or God or both know what they mean to us as an individual. We do now need another book that tells us how we should be living.

We do not need to show off to other people we are a “put your choice of a main stream religion here.” We live our chosen spiritual path and walk in all aspects of our lives every day.

We do not need one specific day of the week to go into a building to “worship” our God. We can do it any day and place; although we do not worship our deities like main stream religions instead we ask them for help and give them an offering, as simple as pouring some water onto the ground, to thank the God and/or Goddess and/or the Element(s) for their help. We do not need a specific God to ask to save our immortal soul after committing a ‘sin’ and because we asked and it was forgiven by him weare are free from whatever wrong we did including murdering another person. We take the responsibility when we haves wronged another living being on Mother Earth an we go directly to the human, Animal,bird, etc and ask for giveness.

We do not need a specific religious dogma to follow. We have many pagan spiritual paths that We many just one to follow or we many pick and chose from more then one path to incorporate as our spiritual and magical path. The way we chose to practice The Old Ways or the more modern Neo-Paganism may change and evolve over time the only constant thing in your Magickal and Spiritual path is YOU!

Just a few things to think about until we meet again. Blessed be dearn

Continue reading “A Thought for Today”