Week 45 – Goddess Knowledge – Lilith

Lilith is a Middle Eastern goddess of abundance, fertility, and fecundity, the giver of agriculture to humans. The first woman created and the first wife of Adam, she refused to be subordinate to Adam in any way. Lilith is associated with the owl, a figure of darkness and deep wisdom, for she is also the goddess of death and transformation. SHe is sometimes represented as a demonic figure, for her dark wisdom and her sexual energy can be very threatening. She is known to appear as a frightening figure in dreams. Lilith is associated with the lotus, and the symbolism of that flower tells us much about her. The lotus, an exquisite flower that grows out of dark, rank, decaying earth, represents spiritual unfolding and the blossoming of wisdom. Like the lotus, Lilith challenges us to look upon our dark side and incorporate it into our wholeness so our great beauty can blossom forth.

To read more about the Middle Eastern Goddess Lilith

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Week 44 Goddess Knowledge – Epona

Epona, from Celtic Gaul, was especially worshiped as a protectress of horses, a bringer of fecundity to mares and well-being to foals. She was the only Celtic goddess to be adopted by the Romans. A lunar goddess, Epona is often depicted with a cornucopia, a symbol of abundance and plenty. Like the symbol of the horse, she is a bringer of fertility, a source of inspiration, and a figure of death – a psychopomp on the soul’s final journey. As late as the twelfth century, Irish kings underwent a ceremony of symbolic birth from Epona in her form of a white mare part of claiming their kingship. In ancient days, a king was ritually wedded to the goddess as part of becoming king.

Comfortable in both realm of life and that of death, Epona is a strong symbol of independence, instinct, and vitality.

To read more about the Celtic Gaul Goddess Epona

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To read more about the Roman Goddess Epona

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SIDE NOTE: In modern times many pagans believe that Epona watches over all domesticated animals to help protection them

Week 43 – Goddess Knowledge – Minerva

Although Minerva, the Roman goddess of war and wisdom, is usually portrayed as equivalent to the Greek goddess Athens, she is revered as a goddess of wisdom, for the light of dawn typifies knowledge. She guides heroes in war and is patroness of all art, crafts, guilds, and medicine. Called by Ovid “the goddess of a thousand words” she was the inventor of musical instruments, numbers, and many crafts including weaving. The serpent and the owl were sacred to her. The serpent is an emblem of life energy and the creative impulse. The owl is a symbol of death and wisdom, and thus Minerva, a goddess of the dawn and wisdom, is also the goddess of death and transformation. Minerva is am incantation of wisdom in human form, an affirmation that we can use our knowledge and wisdom in pursuit of any goal we choose.

More information Roman Goddess Minerva

Images of Roman Goddess Minerva

More information on Greek Goddess Athena

Images of Goddess Athena

More information on Roman poet Ovid

 

Week 41 – Goddess Knowledge -Aphrodite

Aphrodite is most often described as radiant and shinning: when Aphrodite is present the whole world acquires a soft, golden glow. “Foam born,” she is associated with the creative, life-giving sea and represents a sense of freshness, renewal, and hope. a descendant of the prehistoric water bird goddesses of Old Europe, she is often accompanied by birds. The goddess of both spiritual and passionate love, Aphrodite joins us to one another. She is feminine being in all her dullness, and her realm is that of relationship and feeling. Aphrodite demands maturity if we are to be in a true relationship: when we embrace mature love, Aphrodite is there to bless us.

For more information on Goddess Aphrodite

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For more information on European Water Bird Goddesses

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Week 40 – Goddess Knowledge – Isis and Osiris

In Ancient Egypt Isis was among the oldest of the goddesses, the mother and giver of all life. A moon goddess, she gives birth to the sun, creates and sustains all life, and is the savior of all people. The teacher of agriculture, she is also the goddess of medicine and wisdom.

Osiris was her brother and husband. When Osiris was murdered by his brother Set, Isis searched for and found him, revived him, and conceived their son Horus. When Set again too Osiris and scattered his body in fourteen pieces, Isis hunted down each part, except for his reproductive organs, which she was unable to locate, in order to give each piece a proper burial.

Isis, the universal goddess, representing total femininity. She can overcome death itself, yet she is not above grief: one of her tears, wept when Osiris was dying, caused the Nile River to flood. She underscores the depths of emotions that even a goddess must feel.

For more information on Egyptian Goddess Isis

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Goddess Isis and Wicca Information

Images of Goddess Isis in Wicca

For more information on Egyptian God Osiris

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For more information on Egyptian God Set

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For more information on Egyptian God Horus

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Week 39 – Goddess Knowledge Card – Demeter

Demeter is an ancient Greek Great Mother goddess, a goddess of life and death. The Greeks emphasized her role as goddess of cultivated earth, the giver of fruitfulness and abundance and provider of the gift of agriculture. She and her daughter, Persephone, called by the Greeks “the Goddesses,” together represent the continuous cycles of life and death, the two phases of the vegetative power of the earth. Demeter is remembered primarily for her great love for her daughter — when Persephone was abducted by Hades, Demeter’s grief caused the whole earth to go barren. Here we see Demeter ready to give birth, to produce life.

Demeter offers a blessing of fruitfulness and possibility, of coming joy, of abundant life, and of hope.

More information on Greek Goddess Demeter

Images of the Greek Goddess Demeter

More information on Greek Goddess Persephone

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More information on Greek God Hades

Images of Greek God Hades

 

Week 38 – Goddess Knowledge – Hera

Hera is an ancient goddess who, before she appeared as wife to Zeus in Greek mythology, was powerful, matrilineal queen in her own right. Hera is the original, all-powerful, multifunctional goddess responsible for every aspect of existence, a symbol of the complete woman. Among the Greeks, Hera was the goddess of marriage, a special goddess of women who accompanies each woman through every moment of her life. Her various titles point to her roles as bringer of fertility; goddess of marriage; protector of children; of women during childbirth, and of money; and presider over all aspects of public life. She was often represented with a peacock, symbolic of beauty, luxury, and immortality. The spots on its feathers reflect the starry firmament, and the peacock has knowledge of the weather, reflecting the ancient role of the goddess as bringer of the seasons. Hera is a mature, powerful goddess, combining both practicality and nurturing, a strong image of the supremacy of the queen within.

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Week 36 Goddess Knowledge – Ishtar

Ishtar is the multilayered Babylonian creator goddess, the source of all life and embodiment of the power of nature. She is the giver of plenty, the lawgiver, a judge, the goddess of tie as well as the goddess of both love and war. Her name means “giver of light” and derives from her role as queen of heaven. She is the planet Venus as both the morning and evening star, and her girdle is the zodiacal belt. Ishtar descends to the underworld and restores the vegetation god, Tammuz, to life and thus restores fertility to earth. As she descends she removes a veil at each gate. While she is underground life on earth is depressed and nothing comes to life. Ishtar is multifaceted, powerful symbol of a forthright mode of being that is unafraid to venture into the depths of the underworld. She represents the creative feminine, active and strong.

To read more about the Babylonian Goddess Ishtar

To read more about the Babylonian God Tammuz

To see images of the Babylonian Goddess Ishtar

To see images of the Babylonia God Tammuz

 

 

Week 35 – Goddess Knowledge – Rhiannon

Rhiannon is the Great Goddess as worshiped by the Welsh.  without regeneration. She is an embodiment of life, death, and rebirth, for in her realm there is no death without regeneration. Her name derives from Rigantona, which means great “queen.” A shape-shiftier, can assume any form she want; she often appears as a white horse. She is a muse goddess and is accompanied by three sweetly singing birds who can revive the dead or put the living to sleep.The source of the King’s power derived from Rhiannon, the queen, and a candidate for knighthood met Rhiannon dressed as a stag a regal figure symbolic of rejuvenation, beauty, strength, and instinctual masculine energy. In alter myth she a or as Vivien, the Lady of the Lake. Rhiannon is a beautiful queen of the night, a reminder of the close balance between death and rebirth. She demands that we honor our instinctual and animal selves as a source of creativity, abundance, and order.

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Week 34 – Goddess Knowledge – Kaltes

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Klates is moon goddess venerated by Ugric People of western Siberia. A shape-shifter, she is shown here manifested as a hare, an animal sacred to her. This appearance shows her lunar nature, for the hare is a lunar creature; many cultures, when looking at the moon, see the outline of the hare, who lives in the moon. The hare is often seen as an intermediary between lunar deities and humans, so the appearance of Klates in this form indicates her accessibility to her people. Klates is known as a fertility goddess and a goddess of rejuvenation. She is called upon by women in childbirth, for she is especially venerated as a promoter of the beginning of the life cycle. Although she is somewhat feared because she can determine people’s destinies, she is mostly revered for her gentle wisdom, She is a compassionate guide to the mysteries of life.

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