Yule/Winter Solstice December 21st

At Samhain we honoured, celebrated and welcomed the descent into, and return of, the dark – the beginning of the New Year, acknowledging that all beginnings emerge from darkness. At the Winter Solstice we reach the depth of that darkness with the longest night of the year. Darkness has reached its peak.

“Now we start to wonder: will this continue? Will the Earth grow darker and colder as the Sun disappears into the south until only darkness is left? But at Yule a wonderful thing happens. The Sun stops its decline and for a few days it rises in about the same place. This is the crucial time, the cusp between events. The Sun stands still, and everyone waits for the turning.

In our heads we know the light will return. But in the darkness of Winter, can we…

To read the rest of this article please click on the following link: https://www.goddessandgreenman.co.uk/yule

Litha/Summer Solstice June 21st.

Here we are, we have arrived at the longest day and the shortest night of the year. The Goddess is now full and pregnant with Child, and the Sun God is at the height of His virility. This is the peak of the Solar year and the Sun is at the height of its life-giving power. The Earth is awash with fertility and fulfillment and this is a time of joy and celebration, of expansiveness and the celebration of achievements.

Yet within this climax is the whisper and promise of a return to the Dark. As the Light reaches its peak so this is also the moment when the power of the Sun begins to wane. From now on the days grow shorter and the nights grow longer and we are drawn back into the Dark to complete the Wheel of the Year.

At this time the God, as Oak King, is rich in abundance, but he…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.goddessandgreenman.co.uk/litha

Types of Pagan Deities

Many Pagan deities are associated with various aspects of the human experience – love, death, marriage, fertility, and so forth. Still others are connected to different phases of the agricultural cycle, the moon, and the sun. Here is an index of the various gods and goddesses that we discuss here at About Pagan/Wiccan, with links to more detailed information contained within.

How Do I Know if a Deity Is Calling Me?

Question: How Do I Know if a Deity Is Calling Me?

A reader writes in, “There’s been some weird stuff going on in my life, and I’m beginning to notice things happening that make me think a god or goddess is trying to contact me. How do I know that this is the case and that it’s not just my brain making things up?

Answer:

Typically, when someone is “tapped” by a god or goddess, there is a series of messages, rather than a single isolated incident.

Many of these messages are symbolic in nature, rather than actual “Hey! I’m Athena! Lookit, me!” kind of things.

As an example, you might have a dream or vision in which you are approached by a human figure who has something different about them. You’ll probably know it’s a deity, but they are sometimes evasive when it comes to telling you who they are — so you could do some research, and figure out who it was based upon appearance and characteristics.

In addition to a vision, you might have an experience in which symbols of this god or goddess appear randomly in your…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/how-do-i-know-if-a-deity-is-calling-me-2561952?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170321&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

HEKATE (or Hecate)

HEKATE (Hecate) was the goddess of magic, witchcraft, the night, moon, ghosts and necromancy. She was the only child of the Titanes Perses and Asteria from whom she received her power over heaven, earth, and sea.

Hekate assisted Demeter in her search for Persephone, guiding her through the night with flaming torches. After the mother-daughter reunion became she Persephone’s minister and companion in Haides.

Three metamorphosis myths describe the origins of her animal familiars: the black she-dog and the polecat (a mustelid house pet kept by the ancients to hunt vermin). The dog was the Trojan Queen Hekabe (Hecuba) who leapt into the sea after the fall of Troy and was transformed by the goddess. The polecat was either the witch Gale, turned as punishment for her incontinence, or Galinthias, midwife of Alkmene (Alcmena), who was transformed by the enraged goddess Eileithyia but adopted by the sympathetic Hekate.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: http://www.theoi.com/Khthonios/Hekate.html

13 Things You Don’t Need to Know About the Triple Goddess (but are kind of interesting) by John Halstead

1. Gerald Gardner did not worship the Triple Goddess. Gerald Gardner, the father of Wicca, did not mention a Triple Goddess in his “Book of Shadows”.  Nor does Gardner mention a Triple Goddess in Witchcraft Today, which was published in 1954.  He does mention a Triple Goddess in his book, The Meaning of Witchcraft, published in 1959, but only briefly.  Similarly, Raymond Buckland, who is credited with bringing Gardnerian witchcraft to America does not mention the Triple Goddess in Witchcraft from the Inside (1971) or his book, Tree: The Complete Book of Saxon Witchcraft (1974). The Triple Goddess is mentioned only briefly in his best-selling Buckland’s Complete Book of Witchcraft (1986), published twelve years later, and with no exposition.

2.  Gerald Gardner visited Robert Graves.  In 1961, Idries Shah brought Gardner to visit Graves at his home on the island of Majorca.  (Fred Adams, the founder of Feraferia, also visited Graves in 1959.)  Gardner did write an essay about the Triple Goddess entitled “The Triad of the Goddess”.  (I am grateful to Morgan Davis of geraldgardner.com for drawing my attention to this essay.  I’ll be glad to email a .pdf of the document to anyone who requests or you can download it here.)  The essay was found among Gardner’s papers which were purchased by Ripley’s from Gardner’s Witchcraft Museum.  Unfortunately, the essay is undated.  (I have seen someone else give it a date of 1958, but in any case, it appears to have been written after Gardner read Graves.)  In the essay, Gardner describes the “triad of the Goddess” as “LOVE:DEATH:REBIRTH” and compares it to the Christian Trinity and to the triad of “Vrahmin, Vishnu and Siva”.  Gardner argues that the death aspect is misinterpreted as a “Hag aspect” (here he seems to be responding to Graves), and that the true death aspect is not frightening, but comforting.  This is consistent with Gardner’s conception of the Goddess as “light” and the God as “dark”.

3.  Robert Graves wrote about the Triple Goddess before he wrote The White Goddess.  Many Pagans will know that Robert Graves described the Triple Goddess in his book The White Goddess, published in 1948.  But four years earlier, in Hercules, My Shipmate, or The Golden Fleece, which describes the ascendancy of the Olympian gods over the Triple Goddess, he described the Goddess as Maiden, Nymph and Mother, corresponding to the New Moon, Full Moon, and Old Moon.  Then, in 1946, Graves published King Jesus, where he described a Great Triple Moon Goddess of birth, love, and death.  In the narrative, the Triple Goddess takes the form of Miriam (Jesus’ mother), Mary of Cleopas (Jesus’ potential wife), and Mary Magdalene (a witch who is a disciple of the old goddess religion).

4.  The Triple Goddess was not always Maiden-Mother-Crone…

To read the rest of this article please click on or copy and paste this link into your browser: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/allergicpagan/2014/11/19/13-things-you-dont-need-to-know-about-the-triple-goddess-but-are-kind-of-interesting/

The Triple Goddess The Original Holy Trinity

The Triple Goddess is a term first popularised by the poet and scholar Robert Graves in the 20th century. He depicted the triplicity as Maiden, Mother and Crone and many neo-pagans have followed this imagery. While some scholars attributed the idea to the lively imagination of the poet, recent archaeology has made it abundantly clear that “Goddess Triplicities” are to be found throughout ancient Europe.

In Hinduism today, the triplicity of the Goddess in Shakta worship is of cardinal importance, and outside the Indo-European world the Triple Goddess is found in Africa and Asia.

How should the devotee of Our Mother God understand this universal image?

While many of us contemplate the single image of Our Mother, there has always been an important Trinitarian aspect to Her worship. Ironically the great Christian theologian, St. Augustine, mocked the pagans for their belief that the Triple Goddess could be One and also Three. After his conversion he found himself defending the masculinised version of the same doctrine!

There are, as usual, various patriarchal stumbling-blocks to avoid. The most prominent is the attempt to assimilate all three aspects of Dea to the moon. This, of course, comes from the early patriarchal phenomenon that archaeologists call “solarisation” – the process of re-assigning the higher (Solar and Celestial) symbolism to the masculine image and leaving the feminine with the lower (Lunar and Earthly) aspects.

Actually, the lunar aspect of the Trinity is the Daughter, and the contrast between the Solar Mother and Lunar Daughter is one of the beautiful and powerful aspects of Trinitarian Déanism.

The Thealogy of the Triple Goddess…

To read the rest of this article please click on or copy and paste this or into your browser:   http://www.mother-god.com/triple-goddess.html

The Great Horned God

The Great Horned GodThe consort of the Goddess and symbol of male energy in the form of the divine, The Horned God reigns. He is the lord of the woodlands, the hunt and animals. He provides for the tribe through the hunt and is honored or rewarded for his deed by being permitted to copulate with the Goddess through the Great Rite. The Horned God is is the lord of life, death and the underworld. And is the Sun to the Goddess’ Moon. He alternates with the Goddess in ruling over the fertility cycle of birth, death and rebirth. He is born at the winter solstice, unites with the Goddess in marriage at Bealtaine, and dies at the summer solstice to bring fertility to the land as the Sacred King. He is not just a Celtic representation of the God, nor does he solely belong to Wicca, as he has been associated with many deities throughout the world.

  • Cernunnos, The Celtic God of fertility, animals and the underworld.
  • Herne The Hunter, a specter of Britain.
  • Pan the Greek god of the woodlands,
  • Janus the Roman god of good beings.
  • Tammuz and Damuzi, the son, lover and consorts to Ishtar and Inanna.
  • Osiris, the Egyptian Lord of the underworld.
  • Dionysus, the Greek god of vegetation and vine.
  • The Green Man, the lord of vegetation and the woodlands.

The History Of The Horned One…

To read the rest of this please click on this link: https://www.paganspath.com/magik/hornedgod.htm

 

Who Are the Wiccan Horned God and Triple Goddess?

By Mackenzie Sage Wright – A Wiccan of 25 years, Sage likes to put her background as a writer and teacher to use by helping people learn about this NeoPagan path

The Horned God and Triple Goddess are generally the deities you’ll hear people associate with Wicca, but these very same concepts generate a lot of confusion. You’ll read a lot of books that will tell you the Horned God is like this, or the Triple Goddess is like that. There are a lot of oversimplifications and generalizations going on with these descriptions. Many Wiccan sources also refer to the Lord and Lady as well, or “The” God, and “The” Goddess (the article “the” implying they’re specific deities). This leaves people to wonder— to whom, exactly, are we referring when we use these terms?

Wicca, being a 20th century religion, is fairly unique in one way: we don’t actually have our own deities. That is, our religion wasn’t built around veneration of any specific deities of our own—we worship Pagan Gods and Goddesses of other ancient cultures in a new and modern world. We do not have our own unique pantheon, nor do we believe our religion was revealed to us by deities.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link or copy and paste this link into your browser: https://exemplore.com/wicca-witchcraft/Wicca-for-Beginners-Who-Is-the-Horned-God-and-the-Triple-Goddess

Working With Pagan Gods and Goddesses By Patti Wigington (Part 2)

Appropriate Worship – Honoring the Gods the Right Way

One issue that comes up often for people learning about modern Pagan spirituality is the concept of appropriate worship. There tends to be some question about what, exactly, is the right offering to make to the gods or goddesses of one’s tradition — and how we should honor them when making those offerings.

NOT ALL GODS ARE THE SAME

Let’s imagine that you have two friends. First, we have Jill. She likes French cuisine, Meg Ryan movies, soft music and expensive wine.

She’s someone who lets you cry on her shoulder when you’re feeling blue, and she offers some wise and thoughtful insight when you can’t solve a problem on your own. One of her best qualities is her ability to listen.

You also have a friend named Steve. He’s a lot of fun, and sometimes shows up at your house at midnight toting a six-pack. Steve likes watching movies with lots of explosions, took you to your first Metallica concert, and can rebuild a Harley with his eyes closed. He eats mostly bratwurst and Funyuns, enjoys picking up strippers at bars, and is the guy you call when you want to have a good time.

When Jill comes over, are you going to have a nice quiet dinner with a glass of wine and Josh Groban playing in the background, or are you going to hand her a cheeseburger and a beer, pull out the Wii for a round of God of War, and stay up until 3 am seeing who can burp and fart the loudest?

Likewise, if Steve shows up, are you going to do things that he enjoys, or are you going to say, “Hey, Steve, let’s watch Steel Magnolias and talk about our feelings?

WHAT DO YOUR GODS WANT?

((remember this is only one person’s suggestions if you feel another way is apropreite then do it that way) To read the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/appropriate-worship-honoring-the-gods-2561946?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170321&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan