The Royal Mounds of Gamla Uppsala, Ancient Pagan Site of Sweden

The 11th century writer and historian, Adam of Bremen described Gamla Uppsala (meaning ‘Old Uppsala’) in Sweden as a pagan site where a temple dedicated to Thor, Odin and Freyr stood. Adam wrote descriptively, if not always accurately, of the rituals performed there and of the temple itself.

Gamla Uppsala’s Pagan Past

The temple, adorned with a golden chain, was said to be a place where “heathens” would perform animal and human sacrifices , specifically in the sacred grove next to the temple. The trees were “considered to be divine”, and sacrifices —animal and man alike— were said to have been hanged from trees and left to rot, and elaborate ritual songs were sung.

With the coming of Christianity, any temple that might have existed was destroyed, and a church was built over it. Gamla Uppsala eventually became an archbishopric in the 12th century. Still, remnants of its pagan past continued to exist in the landscape of Gamla Uppsala. The ‘Royal Mounds’ endure to this day as a national symbol of Sweden.

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General Information and Images of the Greek/Roman Healing God Asclepius/Aesculapius

Here is the link to see images of Asclepius

Here is the link to see images of Aesculapius

Here is the link for a general search on the Greek/Roman healing god Asclepius/Aesculapius

Asclepius GRECO-ROMAN GOD

Alternative Titles: Aesculapius, Asklepios
Asclepius, Greek Asklepios, Latin Aesculapius, Greco-Roman god of medicine, son of Apollo (god of healing, truth, and prophecy) and the mortal princess Coronis. The Centaur Chiron taught him the art of healing. At length Zeus (the king of the gods), afraid that Asclepius might render all men immortal, slew him with a thunderbolt. Apollo slew the Cyclopes who had made the thunderbolt and was then forced by Zeus to serve Admetus.

Homer, in the Iliad, mentions him only as a skillful physician and the father of two Greek doctors at Troy, Machaon and Podalirius; in later times, however, he was honoured as a hero and eventually worshiped as a god. The cult began in Thessaly but spread to many parts of Greece. Because it was supposed that Asclepius effected cures of the sick in dreams, the practice of sleeping in his temples in Epidaurus in South Greece became common. In 293 BC his cult spread to Rome, where he was worshiped as Aesculapius

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Asclepius GRECO-ROMAN GOD

Asklepios/Aesculapius – Greek/Roman God of Healing

Greek Name Ασκληπιος, Transliteration Asklêpios, Asclepius, Roman Name Aesculapius, Translation To Cut Open

To Cut Open

Asclepius, Greco-Roman marble statue C1st-2nd A.D., State Hermitage Museum

ASKLEPIOS (Asclepius) was the god of medicine. He was also the patron god, and reputed ancestor, of the Asklepiades (Asclepiades), the ancient guild of doctors.

Asklepios was the son of Apollon and the Trikkaian (Triccaean) princess Koronis (Coronis). His mother died in labour and when she was laid out on the pyre, Apollon cut the unborn child from her womb. From this Asklepios received his name which means “to cut open.” Asklepios was raised by the centaur Kheiron (Chiron) who instructed him in the art of medicine. He grew so skilled in the craft that he was able to restore the dead to life. This was a crime against the natural order and so Zeus destroyed him with a thunderbolt

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: ASKLEPIOS/Aesculapius

General Search for the Celtic Healing Goddess Sirona

This is the link for my first general search on google.com keywords “Goddess Sirona” : Sirona – General Seach

On this page, there are other topics you can click on for more information about the Goddess Sirona. To me, she is not only a very interesting diety she is also one of the Goddesses I work with the most often. I have worked with her and/or her through me for so long I consider Sorona a personal friend and one of my patron deities.

I am still looking for pictures that actually represents Sirona the Celtic Goddess instead of how the Romans represented her.

SIRONA Celtic Healer Goddess

Also known as DIRONA Gaulish Fertility Goddess of Hot Springs and Healing

Having fertility trouble? It’s okay, don’t be embarrassed. Just take a hot bath three times a day and you’ll feel much better.

SIRONA is associated with fellow Healing God GRANNUS — although we have yet to see a marriage certificate.

She is also associated with the sky. Her name means ‘star’ and she seems to have an interest in Astronomy too.

To read the rest of the information from this source please click on this link: Sirona

Sirona – Goddess of Healing Springs

{This is a Goddess I have work with and had her work through me for many years now. She has always come when I have called to her to help with healing myself and many other people.}

Goddess worshipped by the Treveri in the Moselle Valley. A healing deity, she was associated with healing springs; her attributes were snakes and eggs. Many of her temples and shrines were constructed around thermal springs or wells.

She was associated with the sky, her name means “star” and she is a goddess of healing, astronomy, and fertility. She was often depicted with a snake drapped over her arm for the sign of rebirth, carrying 3 eggs, and wearing a crown or diadem of stars and sometimes she is depicted with a dog in her lap.

To read more information from this source please click on this link: Sirona

Goddesses and Gods of Healing

This week I will be posting information on the different Gods and Goddesses of healing from different pantheons. we will start with a general list from Thoughts.com. I will pick a God and Goddess each day and give your more detailed information about them and some ways to use healing in your practice.

In many magical traditions, healing rituals are performed in tandem with a petition to the god or goddess of the pantheon who is representative of healing and wellness. If you or a loved one is ill or off-kilter, whether emotionally or physically or spiritually, you may want to investigate this list of deities. There are many, from a variety of cultures, who can be called upon in times of need for healing and wellness magic.

To learn more please click on this link: General List Gods and Goddesses of Healing

Modern Pagan Festivals: A Study in the Nature of Tradition

The cluster of recently appeared religions known as Paganism have developed, over the past sixty years, a distinctive cycle of annual festivals, most of which draw on long historic roots but that are grouped together in a modern framework. No study has yet been made of the manner in which this cycle developed, and potentially rich rewards may be gained from doing so. Such a project is a rare opportunity to study a religious festive tradition in the process of evolution, and also to suggest features of the nature of tradition in modern societies, and the manner in which it is perceived by scholars in different disciplines.

Introduction

During the past thirty years, scholars have gradually become aware of the existence, across the western world, of a rapidly growing complex of modern religions organised under the label of Paganism. [1 [1] In conformity with practices now becoming established in the discipline of Religious Studies, I refer to modern Pagan religions with a capital letter, but keep the lower case, “pagan,” when referring to the pre-Christian religions of Europe and the Near East, and to subsequent reflections on them. For a discussion of the rationale behind this distinction, see Hutton (2003Hutton, Ronald2003Witches, Druids and King Arthur: Studies in Paganism, Myth and MagicLondonHambledon and London. , xiii–xv).View all notes] Although they differ from each other in the nature of their deities, rites, and organisation, they have certain definitive features in common: most obviously, a veneration of the feminine principle of divinity as well as the masculine, a sense of an inherent sanctity in the natural world, an ethic of responsible individual self-expression that rejects concepts of sin and salvation, and an identification with the pre-Christian religions of Europe and the Near East. They are also more or less united by the observation of a common pattern of eight annual seasonal festivals. The study of festivity is currently a focus of considerable interest among scholars of religion, society, and culture, in several different disciplines: it is, indeed, a phenomenon encountered in all, or virtually all, human cultures. The most comprehensive and considered definition of a festival, by a social scientist, seems to have been that of Alessandro FalassiFalassi, Alessandro1987. “Festival: Definition and Morphology”. In Time Out of Time: Essays on the Festival, Edited by: Falassi, Alessandro110AlbuquerqueUniversity of New Mexico Press. : “a periodically recurrent, social occasion in which, through a multiplicity of forms and a series of co-ordinated events, participate directly or indirectly and to various degrees, all members of a whole community, united by ethnic, linguistic, religious, historical bonds and sharing a worldview” (1987Falassi, Alessandro1987. “Festival: Definition and Morphology”. In Time Out of Time: Essays on the Festival, Edited by: Falassi, Alessandro110AlbuquerqueUniversity of New Mexico Press. , 2).

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Modern Pagan Festivals: A Study in the Nature of Tradition

Happily Heathen: The Positives and Negatives of Dedicating to a Deity

As my name implies, I am dedicated to the Vanic Goddess Freya and consider myself Her daughter. My spiritual path has always been guided by a desire for a direct, personal relationship with deity (not unlike that of the Christian or Sufi mystics), so my relationship with Freya is as close as, if not closer than, my relationships with my family members and my partner.

However, my relationship with Her is also closer than my relationship with Her brother Freyr, to whom I’m also dedicated. My relationship with Him is much newer and less intense, and fills a different role in my spiritual life. There are a wide range of levels of devotion and types of devotion among devotional polytheists. (I would argue that this kind of relationship, by default, has to be one of our most idiosyncratic of practices.) Just like relationships between humans, relationships between humans and deities–even devotional or dedicated relationships–can vary greatly. Just as you can be involved in a many different friendships for a variety of reasons, so can people be devoted with the Gods in many different ways. The experiences and opinions I share here are really only reflective of me and my relationship with Freya, who has been my primary Goddess.

When I first started working for her, I was full of zeal and love for Her and I couldn’t really figure out why everyone did not want to honor Her and devote themselves to Her. (Laine deLaney of The Lady’s Quill wrote a lovely description of Her here.) ….

To read this rest of this article please click on this link: Happily Heathen: The Positives and Negatives of Dedicating to a Deity