Correspondences: Spring Flower Magic Share

(I realize we are almost into summer or winter depending on where you live but I still want to share this because many of the plants grow from bulbs which need to be planted in the fall.)

As spring arrives, our gardens begin to bud and eventually bloom. For hundreds of years, the plants that we grow have been used in magic. Flowers in particular are often connected with a variety of magical uses. Now that spring is here, keep an eye out for some of these flowers around you, and consider the different magical applications they might have.

CROCUS

This flower is one of the first you’ll see in the spring, and it’s often associated with newly blooming love.

The crocus is also known to enhance visions and bring about intuitive dreams. Author Susan Gregg recommends in The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Magical Plants, “By their very presence, crocus plants remind each of us that even at the darkest points in life, the seeds of happiness and joy live within our hearts. If you are going through a rough time in your life, hold a crocus flower or an image of one in your hand while you are meditating. Then simply open your heart and your mind to visions of what you can create.”

Daffodil

The bright petals of the daffodil are typically found in shades of white, yellow or even pale orange. This flower is associated with love and fertility — place fresh ones in your home to bring about abundance. Wear this flower close to your heart to draw love and luck. Place daffodils on your altar during workings related to love, especially if it’s a new relationship and you’re still trying to figure out how to navigate the waters.

Add potted daffodil bulbs — don’t worry if they’re blooming yet – to your altar for spring celebrations, along with other spring flowers such as forsythia, crocus, and snowdrops.

Dandelion …

For the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/correspondences-spring-flower-magic-2562472?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170404&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

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The Magical Moon Garden

Many Pagans love to garden, but a lot of people don’t realize you can grow plants and flowers that bloom at night. Cultivating a moon garden is a great way to get in touch with nature, and it provides a beautiful and fragrant backdrop for your moonlight rituals in the summer. If you plant these lovelies close to your house, you can open the windows and take advantage of their aromas as you sleep.

Many night-blooming plants are white, and give a luminous appearance in the moonlight.

If you plant them in a circle or a crescent shape, when they bloom, you’ll have the moon herself right there “as above, so below.” There are a number of plants that open at night — mix them in with silver-foliaged day bloomers.

NIGHT BLOOMING PLANTS…

For the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/the-magical-moon-garden-2562382?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170404&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Magical Gardening Around the World

Around the world, people tend to garden in different ways. Someone living on a large family farm plants their crops differently than someone on a half-acre lot in the suburbs. A resident of a big city in an advanced nation will grow things in a different fashion than a family living in an impoverished, third world country. While one person might use a large tractor and motorized equipment, another may use a simple shovel.

In the early spring, many of us who follow earth-based spiritual paths begin planning our gardens for the coming season. The very act of planting, of beginning new life…

To read the rest of the story please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/magical-gardening-around-the-world-2562458?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170404&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Magical Gardening Around the World

Around the world, people tend to garden in different ways. Someone living on a large family farm plants their crops differently than someone on a half-acre lot in the suburbs. A resident of a big city in an advanced nation will grow things in a different fashion than a family living in an impoverished, third world country. While one person might use a large tractor and motorized equipment, another may use a simple shovel.

Still another might only use a pointed stick to make a hole in the ground. Since time began, the human race has managed to find ways to make things grow where before there was nothing.

In the early spring, many of us who follow earth-based spiritual paths begin planning our gardens for the coming season. The very act of planting, of beginning new life from seed, is a ritual and a magical act in itself. To cultivate something in the black soil, see it sprout and then bloom, is to watch a magical working unfold before our very eyes. The plant cycle is intrinsically tied to so many earth-based belief systems that it should come as no surprise that the magic of the garden is one well worth looking into.

Let’s look at some of the folklore and traditions that surround gardening and planting magic.

For the rest of this interesting article by Patti Wiggington please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/magical-gardening-around-the-world-2562458?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170404&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Dangerous Herbs

Toxic and Poisonous Herbs

If you’re using herbs in your magical practice, as many of us do, it’s important to keep in mind that they may not all be safe to handle or ingest. Many herbs are fine for people, but toxic to household pets. Still other herbs can be used by anyone but pregnant women. Let’s look at some of the different herbs you may be using in magical practice, and how they can be dangerous if you’re not careful.

Do keep in mind that this is not – and is not intended to be – a list of every toxic or harmful herb. It is a list of some commonly used herbs that can be dangerous to pregnant women or household pets. If you’re using a particular plant and you’re not sure if it’s toxic or not, then do your homework and make sure it’s safe to use before you do anything with it.

HERBS DANGEROUS TO PREGNANT WOMEN

If you’re pregnant, attempting to become pregnant, or nursing, you’ll need to exercise extra caution when working with herbs. Many can cause miscarriage if ingested. Before taking any herbs internally – or, for that matter, handling them with bare hands – be sure to check with your healthcare professional to make sure they’re safe.

The following are just a few of the many herbs out there that can be harmful to pregnant women.

For the rest of this article by Patti Wiggins please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/toxic-and-poisonous-herbs-2562022?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170228&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Magical Aromatherapy

Ask any Pagan or Wiccan what they love most about working with herbs, and chances are good they’ll tell you how much they love the smell. Herbs contain small glands that hold their essential oils, and when these oils are extracted they release scent molecules. The science of aromatherapy takes advantage of this natural phenomenon and expands it just a bit — because olfactory sensation stimulates parts of the brain connected to memory and emotion.

ROMATHERAPY HISTORY

Although aromatherapy is a fairly new practice in the United States, herbal essential oils have been used for thousands of years in other parts of the world. The Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, and Chinese have all used essential oils in cosmetics, for ritual oils, and even in cosmetics.

In the modern era, lavender oil and its healing properties was one of the first essential oils to be looked at from a medical perspective. A French chemist named René-Maurice Gattefossé experienced an explosion in his laboratory, during which he sustained a burn to the skin of his hand. He applied lavender oil, and discovered that its healing properties could be used in a number of ways; specifically, he studied its efficacy on war wounds such as gangrene and chemical burns.

It should be noted that not everyone sees aromatherapy as a true scientific discipline; many believe there is simply a placebo effect.

A 2008 study done at The Ohio State University found that “an investigation on how aromatherapy affects health failed to show any improvement in immune status, wound healing, or pain control among people exposed to two scents. But results of the randomized controlled trial… did show that lemon (considered to be a stimulant) appeared to enhance mood, while lavender (thought to be a relaxant) had no effect on mood.”

For the rest of this article by Patti Wiggins please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/magical-aromatherapy-overview-2562017?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170228&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

Magical Herbal Correspondences

Even though it’s the end of February, the unseasonably warm weather in many places has gotten a lot of us thinking about spring a little bit early – and with spring comes gardening! Are you thinking about planting some magical herbs in your garden this year? Even if you don’t have a big yard, you can grow herbs in containers to use in spellwork and rituals later on. Let’s take a look at some of the most popular magical herbs to grow, so you can start planning your plantings!

 

Herbs have been used for thousands of years, both medicinally and ritually. Every herb has its own unique characteristics, and these properties are what makes the plant special. Subsequently, many Pagans use herbs as part of their regular ritual practice.

Also, be sure to read about herbal correspondences to get a feel for which herbs are useful in what types of workings: Magical Herb Use.

This first part is 29 different “pages” long. To read the other 28 information articles and see the pictures of each herb please click on this link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/herbalism/ss/Magical-Herbs.htm?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170228&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

 

Plant List

The Cosmic Cookie Trail led me to the following site.  They have a nice list of plants and the various correspondences for them.  For example: they list the Deity, Element, and Spiritual uses of the plant.

You can read the list at the following link:

http://tribeofthesun.com/plants/plant-list/

May the Cosmic Cookie Trail lead you on your own spiritual journey of discovery.

©08072016 Wolf Woman Ways

Mortar and Pestle, My Dilemma

Tonight I want to share a thought or two with you about a tool we use as Witches and simply take for granted.

I’ve recently dried my home grown herbs and am going to use these to get my Witch Cupboard started. I have also ordered quite a few herbs from an organic company, some are safe and some are toxic. I prefer to use herbs over oils because the oil scent is to strong for me and they give me a headache which makes it difficult to focus. I also like to experiment with ideas for making poppets, herbal bags, burning incense and such. To do this I need to crush herbal ingredients together, choosing the correct herb to resonate with the spell is important, for example, I don’t want any herbal residue from a previous use to counteract what I’m trying to do now. That train of thought brought to mind the possibility of becoming possibly poisoned, because I burnt a lovely rose petal  incense but some toxic herb was left in the bowl. (No this has not happened, but my paranoia runs away from me.) Immediately I researched How To Clean A Mortar and Pestle. I searched and couldn’t find anything about it. I ended up emailing the company I purchased the herbs from and the only thing they could suggest to me was to make sure I have 3 mortar and pestles, one for resin, one for toxic herbs and one for non toxic herbs. Their reasoning was because many bowls are made of porous materials which will collect in the stone. As I am a Witch on a budget I didn’t want to hear that for an answer, but I completely understand where thy are coming from.  My concern is this Sisters and Brothers In The Craft, I do not want any of you getting poisoned because of rushing into something without thinking every possible outcome through.

In Perfect Love and Perfect Trust,

SunRay Sorceress