Dragons from Animal Magick The Art of Recognizing and Working with Familiar

The Dragon in one form or another was known to the majority of the world cultures in both the Old and New Worlds. It was one of the early symbols of the Great Mother Goddess of the matriarchies. Until the arrival of patriarchal societies, the dragon was considered to be a sacred, benevolent creature; its serpent body symbolized matter and life-giving water of creation, its wings spirit and the breath of life.

It was used as an emblem for divinity and royalty in Babylon, Egypt, China, Japan, Greece, and Rome. The Chinese Manchu dynasty, the Phoenicians, and the Saxons all showed it as enthroned, a symbol of the power of the ruler. The Chinese dragon symbolized the masculine yang power, very high spiritual power, and the emperor himself. This connection with imperial power carried over to England and Wales.

The dragon was known as the Ling of Larger Serpents to medieval writers. Dragons and bulls in the Western world were fought by such Sun-heroes as Mithras, Sigfried, Hercules, Jason, Hours, and Apollo.

In Hindu myth, Vitra, the Dragon of Waters, was killed by Indra so that the waters could be released upon the Earth. The dragon was also the emblem of Aruna and Soma.

There are two major categories of physical appearance of dragons: those of the East and those of the West.

The Oriental or Chinese dragon looked terrible and fierce, but was a symbol of prosperity, rain, wisdom, and hidden secrets. Oriental dragons did not have wings, but were shaped more like huge serpents with four legs. The early Chinese worshiped the dragon, and at one time had its image on national flags. Using the symbol of the five-toed imperial dragon was reserved for emperors. The guardian of the mansions of the gods was the Chinese Celestial Dragon, T’ien Lung; he also prevented the deities from falling out of their heavenly realm. Oriental heroes did not hunt dragons, as Western heroes. The Oriental dragons were said to leave their mountain caves or watery homes in the spring to bring fertilizing rains.

Both Chinese and Japanese believe that dragons can turn themselves into birds. The three-clawed dragon of Japan symbolized the Mikado, the imperial and spiritual power. Most Japanese dragons were said to live in lakes and springs.

Ancient Western writers wrote all kinds of terrifying things about the Western dragon. These creatures were built like enormous lizards with wings, their bodies were thicker than those of the Oriental dragons. Their throats and back legs were like those of an eagle, the grasping front legs like those of a reptile, and a tail that ended in an arrow-point. Western dragons were considered to be enemies of the humans, and heroes were always hunting them down and killing them. Under the circumstances, its no wonder that Western dragons stopped trying to get along with humans. They liked to live in dark caves, a few of them in water. They breathed fire, and their breath was supposed to spread plagues.

The dragon in alchemy had a number of meanings. If several dragons were shown fighting each other, it meant separating out the Elements, or psychic disintegration. A dragon biting its tail symbolized cyclic processes and time; this particular dragon was known to the Gnostics as Ouroboros. A winged dragon represented a volatile Element, while the wingless dragon stood for a fixed Element.

In spiritual definitions, the dragon represents the supernatural, infinity itself, and the spiritual powers of change and transformation.

Magickal Attributes: Protection, instruction in the spiritual, Element magick. Using the spiritual to transform life. Protection. Adding extra power to magick.

Chant

         Dragons strong and dragons bright,

Dragons full of wisdom old,

        Teach to me the spiritual light,

         Let me walk in knowledge bold,

         Dragon fire, lift me higher!

Animal Magick Copyright D. J. Conway 1995 Pages 242-243

 

 

Advertisements

Share Your Campanion and/or Familar(s) With Us

Many of us have familiar companion that is also our familiar that we share a spiritual and magickal bond with. A few of us our blessed and lucky to have more than one in our life at the same time.

I am blessed with two campanoins/familiars in my life for the last almost four years.

First is a birthday present from my husband, my almost nine year old Miniature Pinscher, Drama Queen Cleopatra JAWS. Better know as Cleo. Who protects my home and land. Gives me energy on days I have to get things done and lack the energy to do it. She also helps protect my physically body from harm by other dogs or when I am traveling to Other worlds ( Celtic term for Astral Planes). Her birthday is February 11, 2009.

Second is a rescue dog my almost six year old Chihuahua, Princess Starbabie. Better know as Star. We got Star just before her second birthday and her sister welcomed her with open paws. Star is my constant companion. She attends every gathering and private circles I do. She lends me calmness and helps me be more level headed. She joins with Cleo in protecting my physically body from harm when I am traveling in Otherworlds. Star is who I turn to for calling energy when I am upset or angry. Her birthday is March 30 2012.

Both of my girls are boys to have as companions and familiars. One of both give me a reason to laugh hardy and sometimes long at funny things the do. I have found when I am down or depressed the antics increase causing me to laugh more and feel better.

Please tell us about your animal companion and/ or familiar. If you want to share a picture with us please send the photo, animals name, and your first in the body of an email to ladybeltane@aol.com Subject line should say “My Animal”. If you want to share about a companion that has crossed The Raibow Bridge please do.

I  am looking forward to reading your stories and seeing you pictures.

What is an Animal Familiar? by Patti Wigington

In some traditions of modern Paganism, including the various Wiccan paths, the concept of an animal familiar is incorporated into practice. Today, a familiar is often defined as an animal with whom we have a magical connection, but in truth, the concept is a bit more complex than this.

HISTORY OF THE FAMILIAR

During the days of the European witch hunts, familiars were “said to be given to witches by the devil,” according to Rosemary Guiley’s Encyclopedia of Witches and Witchcraft.

They were, in essence, small demons which could be sent out to do a witch’s bidding. Although cats – especially black ones – were the favored vessel for such a demon to inhabit, dogs, toads, and other small animals were sometimes used.

In some Scandinavian countries, familiars were associated with spirits of the land and nature. Fairies, dwarves, and other elemental beings were believed to inhabit the physical bodies of animals. Once the Christian church came along, this practice went underground — because any spirit other than an angel must be a demon. During the witch-hunt era, many domestic animals were killed because of their association with known witches and heretics.

To read the rest of this please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-an-animal-familiar-2562343?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170509&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan