A Happy Ending for an Endangered Animal

This article appeared in the news feed on AOL.com it is in a slideshow type presentation but worth reading from beginning to end as it has to do with one of our fellow creatures that inhabit Mother Earth. I applaud the Singapore students for caring enough about this fellow creature to do the right things. The animal’s species is called Pangolin.

Here is the link to the article I am referring to Pangolin Rescue

For more information on exactly what a Pangolin is here is a link to a general search I did on Google.com More Information about Pangolins  I had never heard of this animal before seeing it in the AOL newsfeed. But as it is an endangered animal I want to learn more about it. I hope you do too.

Please leave a thought or two about how you think and/or feel about the trafficking of animals just for the price tag they have on them, especially those on the endangered list.

 

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Omens & Oracles: Ouroboros-Mysteries of the Snake

Few animals are so steeped in mystic lore as the snake or serpent. Simultaneously feared, revered, worshipped and shunned, the snake has an archetypal power over the human psyche that bridges cultures and tunnels back through time. The repulsive yet mesmerizing power of the snake exists in full force today, in people’s phobias of, and fascination with, these ancient reptiles. In the Garden of Eden, the snake was a symbol of evil and temptation, a mouthpiece for the devil himself, hissing encouragement of sin and carnal knowledge to Eve and Adam.

To continue reading…  

 

 

Spirit of White Buffalo

 

Native American myths and culture have always been my inspiration. The first approach to the mysteries of Shamanism in my life was through the  Native American ways of spiritual work. Then I learned about the Scandinavian Shamanism and I discovered the many common things in both paths. My studies and research led me to the knowledge that in its essence the pagan ways are quite alike in the different parts of the world as are the Old religions,too. They all seem to have one origin that is very old and points towards the beginning of human history on Earth.

Here is a wonderful article I found online about the White Buffalo Spirit . This is the Spirit who walks between the worlds and connects the Red Road/ the path of incarnation and physical life / and the Blue Road / the path of the Spirit /.

When you think of Celtic tradition these are Dragons who walk between the worlds and open new realms, in Native American traditions it is White Buffalo Spirit  who connects the worlds.

Read about this here

http://www.crystalwind.ca/animal-totems/spirit-of-white-buffalo

and a powerful meditation with Native American Flute sound

 

 

 

 

 

Native American calling/prayer

Four Directions Prayer

Creator, it is I. Thank you for today’s sunrise, for the breath and life within me, and for all of your creations. Creator, hear my prayer, and honor my prayer.

As the day begins with the rising sun, I ask, Spirit keeper of the East, Brother Eagle, Be with me. …

Spirit keeper of the South, Wolf, Be with me. Help me to remember to love and feel compassion for all mankind. …

Spirit Keeper of the West, Brown Bear, Be with me. Bring healing to the people I love and to myself. ….

Spirit Keeper of the North, White Buffalo, Be with me….

Mother Earth, Thank you for your beauty, And for all you have given me. Remind me never to take from you more then I need, and remind me to always give back more than I take.

Read the original article here

http://aktalakota.stjo.org/site/News2?page=NewsArticle&id=8582

Dragons from Animal Magick The Art of Recognizing and Working with Familiar

The Dragon in one form or another was known to the majority of the world cultures in both the Old and New Worlds. It was one of the early symbols of the Great Mother Goddess of the matriarchies. Until the arrival of patriarchal societies, the dragon was considered to be a sacred, benevolent creature; its serpent body symbolized matter and life-giving water of creation, its wings spirit and the breath of life.

It was used as an emblem for divinity and royalty in Babylon, Egypt, China, Japan, Greece, and Rome. The Chinese Manchu dynasty, the Phoenicians, and the Saxons all showed it as enthroned, a symbol of the power of the ruler. The Chinese dragon symbolized the masculine yang power, very high spiritual power, and the emperor himself. This connection with imperial power carried over to England and Wales.

The dragon was known as the Ling of Larger Serpents to medieval writers. Dragons and bulls in the Western world were fought by such Sun-heroes as Mithras, Sigfried, Hercules, Jason, Hours, and Apollo.

In Hindu myth, Vitra, the Dragon of Waters, was killed by Indra so that the waters could be released upon the Earth. The dragon was also the emblem of Aruna and Soma.

There are two major categories of physical appearance of dragons: those of the East and those of the West.

The Oriental or Chinese dragon looked terrible and fierce, but was a symbol of prosperity, rain, wisdom, and hidden secrets. Oriental dragons did not have wings, but were shaped more like huge serpents with four legs. The early Chinese worshiped the dragon, and at one time had its image on national flags. Using the symbol of the five-toed imperial dragon was reserved for emperors. The guardian of the mansions of the gods was the Chinese Celestial Dragon, T’ien Lung; he also prevented the deities from falling out of their heavenly realm. Oriental heroes did not hunt dragons, as Western heroes. The Oriental dragons were said to leave their mountain caves or watery homes in the spring to bring fertilizing rains.

Both Chinese and Japanese believe that dragons can turn themselves into birds. The three-clawed dragon of Japan symbolized the Mikado, the imperial and spiritual power. Most Japanese dragons were said to live in lakes and springs.

Ancient Western writers wrote all kinds of terrifying things about the Western dragon. These creatures were built like enormous lizards with wings, their bodies were thicker than those of the Oriental dragons. Their throats and back legs were like those of an eagle, the grasping front legs like those of a reptile, and a tail that ended in an arrow-point. Western dragons were considered to be enemies of the humans, and heroes were always hunting them down and killing them. Under the circumstances, its no wonder that Western dragons stopped trying to get along with humans. They liked to live in dark caves, a few of them in water. They breathed fire, and their breath was supposed to spread plagues.

The dragon in alchemy had a number of meanings. If several dragons were shown fighting each other, it meant separating out the Elements, or psychic disintegration. A dragon biting its tail symbolized cyclic processes and time; this particular dragon was known to the Gnostics as Ouroboros. A winged dragon represented a volatile Element, while the wingless dragon stood for a fixed Element.

In spiritual definitions, the dragon represents the supernatural, infinity itself, and the spiritual powers of change and transformation.

Magickal Attributes: Protection, instruction in the spiritual, Element magick. Using the spiritual to transform life. Protection. Adding extra power to magick.

Chant

         Dragons strong and dragons bright,

Dragons full of wisdom old,

        Teach to me the spiritual light,

         Let me walk in knowledge bold,

         Dragon fire, lift me higher!

Animal Magick Copyright D. J. Conway 1995 Pages 242-243

 

 

A ‘one in a million’ yellow cardinal is dazzling the Internet with its sunshiny feathers

Jeremy Black, an Alabama wedding and wildlife photographer, recently spent five hours in a friend’s back yard in the hope of capturing an image of what he called “the most captivating cardinal in Alabaster, Alabama.”

But that description sells this bird too short. The northern cardinal that Black ended up photographing was not the usual deep red of males but dazzlingly yellow. It could easily claim to be the most captivating bird in the nation — or at least on the Internet. Black’s photo, which was shared on the Facebook page of the Naturalist’s Notebook, promptly went viral.

“As soon as it landed, I was star-struck,” Black told National Geographic. “It kind of took my breath away a little bit.”

To read the rest of this article please click on the link or copy and paste it into your browser: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2018/02/26/a-one-in-a-million-yellow-cardinal-is-dazzling-the-internet-with-its-sunshiny-feathers/?utm_term=.f3c412cd2fa2&wpisrc=nl_rainbow&wpmm=1

Let’s honor our ancestors.

The Festival of the Dead or Feast of Ancestors is held in many cultures around the world. For centuries people globally have been honoring their ancestors. The reverent devotion expressed by their deceased forbears through a culturally prescribed set of rules and observances.  From Japan, China, Korea to Nepal, Peru, Mexico, India, Scotland, Ireland and Cambodia are to name just a few.

The ancient Greeks, Romans, Persians, the Pacific and Tongan Islands, Africa and Native America till this day continue to recognize the honoring. These religious traditions have remained steadfast and are usually practiced among cultures who have strong ancestral reverence.

I take this time of the year to remember all the people in my life gone. I build a little remembrance alter, give them an offering, light a candle and allow myself to slip between the veil.

Happy all Hallows Eve.

A link with an insight on how people around the world celebrate their ancestors.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/festivals-dead-around-world-180953160/

Hypatia

Hypatia Of Alexandrea

Legends and Lore of Bees

In the middle of spring, a magical thing begins to happen outside. In addition to the greening of the earth, we notice a change in the local wildlife. Suddenly, squirrels and chipmunks are everywhere. Birds are twittering away madly in the trees, worms are popping up right and left in the soil, and everywhere you look, life has returned. In particular, you’ll see bees buzzing around your garden, partaking of the rich pollen in your flowers and herbs.

The plants are in full bloom at this time of the spring, and the bees take full advantage, buzzing back and forth, carrying pollen from one blossom to another.

In addition to providing us with honey and wax, bees are known to have magical properties, and they feature extensively in folklore from many different cultures. These are just a few of the legends about bees:

  • In some areas of New England and Appalachia, it was believed that once…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: https://www.thoughtco.com/legends-and-lore-of-bees-2561655?utm_campaign=list_paganwiccan&utm_content=20170404&utm_medium=email&utm_source=exp_nl&utm_term=list_paganwiccan

NATIVE AMERICAN LEGENDS – Native American Totem Animals & Their Meanings (From One Source)

A totem is a spirit being, sacred object, or symbol of a tribe, clan, family or individual. Native American tradition provides that each person is connected with nine different animals that will accompany him or her  through life, acting as guides.

 

Different animal guides, also called spirit guides and/or power animals, come in and out of our lives depending on the direction that we are headed and the tasks that need to be completed along our journey.

 

Native beliefs further explain that a totem animal is one that is with you for life, both in the physical and spiritual world. Though people may identify with different animal guides throughout their lifetimes, it is this one totem animal that acts as the main guardian spirit.

 
With this one animal, a connection is shared, either through interest in the animal, characteristics, dreams, or other interaction.

 

This Animal Guide offers power and wisdom to the individual when they “communicate” with it, conveying their respect and trust. This does not necessarily mean that he or she has actually touched or spent time with this animal, more that, they are open to learning its lessons.

 

For some, knowing what is their totem animal is almost an innate process. It’s as if they’ve always known, inexplicably drawn to the animal or having a special feeling for the animal’s energy. For others, they wonder how to tell what their animal totem is.

 

Here are some questions to ask yourself if you’re wondering what your animal totem is:

To read the rest oof this article please click on this link: http://www.legendsofamerica.com/na-totems.html