The People to Thank for Letting Me Keep Lady Abyss’ Legacy Alive

Witches Of The Craft®

Lady Abyss once told me she use to have a page that listed the name of the people who made donations to WOTC but took it down so those who couldn’t donate didn’t feellike bad. I agree to keep a page on the website all the time for that is unfair but I am making an exception because these donations were for a very special reason. Please do not feel bad if you wanted to help but were unable to. I totally understand not having even $1.00 extra to help. That is the position I’m in right or I would have covered all the costs for the death certificate, overnight snail mail, getting a paper notarized, domain name yearly fee to get the domain name and website switching over into my name. So those of us who could not donate to help cover the cost still have a very important…

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Lady Abyss’ Legacy is Able to Continue

Thank you for your help. I’m very proud of how Coven Life stepped up to help me and our community out. If it wasn’t for people from CL donating the goal would not have been reached!

Witches Of The Craft®

My deepest gratitude to the  7 people who made the donations for me to get Lady A’s death certificate and have another paper that has too be notarized, plus the cost for overnighting the request for the death certificate to Kentucky possible. Dear Sisters and Brother remember the Threefold Law what you send out comes back to you three times as strong so look for a lot of love and positive energy coming your way!

I will be printing off and filling out all the paperwork after I get off of work to night.  Than walking to the post office to mail paperwork off with that done I will be going directly to my bank to get the other paper notarized. When I’m done with that I will immediately email WordPress that all the paperwork they want will be in before the expiration date.

Be true to my word I…

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We’re Almost There

Witches Of The Craft®

Thank you so much for the donations that have come in. I am going to get the paperwork printed out when I gget home from work. Than I will go to the post office tomorrow and send it off. Thanks to a few peoples generosity we just need about $20.00 to pay for another year of having the domain name created by Lady Abyss. This is the only year that whole domain name and website thing will be a problem.

Again a huge thank you to those who donated!!! With the Threefold Law you will be in for receiving something grand.

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Please Help Me Save Lady Abyss’ Legacy

Witches Of The Craft®

In order to be able to keep WitchesofTheCraft.com domain name that has been tied to the WOTC website for almost 20 years WordPress said need a copy of her death certificate. Now that someone I know was able to find her middle name today I can apply for it. I am working on a deadline that is only 11 days away and I am broke. I humbly ask if some of the 3, 500 + followers of WOTC could even donated only $1.00 USD by midnight 12:00 AM CST I would very grateful. Since I bought WOTC I have never asked you to donate some of you hard earned money until now.

PLEASE HELP ME SAVE LADY of the ABYSS’ LEGACY.

The total cost for the death certificate is $55.00 USD

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Week 36 Goddess Knowledge – Ishtar

Ishtar is the multilayered Babylonian creator goddess, the source of all life and embodiment of the power of nature. She is the giver of plenty, the lawgiver, a judge, the goddess of tie as well as the goddess of both love and war. Her name means “giver of light” and derives from her role as queen of heaven. She is the planet Venus as both the morning and evening star, and her girdle is the zodiacal belt. Ishtar descends to the underworld and restores the vegetation god, Tammuz, to life and thus restores fertility to earth. As she descends she removes a veil at each gate. While she is underground life on earth is depressed and nothing comes to life. Ishtar is multifaceted, powerful symbol of a forthright mode of being that is unafraid to venture into the depths of the underworld. She represents the creative feminine, active and strong.

To read more about the Babylonian Goddess Ishtar

To read more about the Babylonian God Tammuz

To see images of the Babylonian Goddess Ishtar

To see images of the Babylonia God Tammuz

 

 

Angel/Tarot Advice for the week of 18 November 2019

Hi!  It’s a new week!  Yeah baby yeah!  Be sure to check out your Angel/Tarot Advice for the entire week of 18 November 2018, because you definitely aren’t alone!

Also, please follow the Silver Sage Witch Blog.

If you got something that you can use from the information in my video, please subscribe to my YouTube channel. Thank you.  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCopeuk53MA1yZp32xlP_DQg

Santeria

Luna Llena

When I began to explore Wicca, I wondered how Santeria, saint worship, would fit into what I was learning about the Craft. Seeking clarification for this dilemma, I consulted an online Wicca blog. I wanted discussion, instead I received admonition, and warning that traditions should not be mixed because the Gods and Goddesses would not like it. I listened and considered, but continued to seek feedback because I knew I was on the track of something powerful. Then I found a diagram in Higginbotham (2012), placing Santeria under the umbrella of paganism, which also included Wicca, Druidism, and eclectic traditions. I was delighted. Here was inclusion of different traditions and perhaps there was room for a looser more accepting interpretation of paganism! Reading Cunningham (1996), he seemed to imply one could blend traditions but the protocol for Wicca rituals needed to be respected. Things were now starting to fall into place. As I continued to read, study, explore and learn, my solitary practice evolved to intertwine the tradition of Santeria with those of the Craft.  

My experience with Santeria

Growing up in a NYC working class neighborhood of Catholics and mixed ethnicities I was surrounded by saint statues and candles in the homes of friends and neighbors, Puertoriqueños, Dominicanos, Cubanos, Italians, Irish. My friends were first and second generation Americans, the grandmothers and some of the parents still spoke their ethnic language and played their old- country music. It was an interesting way to grow up. At that time Catholicism was all I knew, seeing it practiced in various ways.

My parents, from Mexico were not outwardly religious. My paternal grandmother however, maintained what I interpreted as an ancestral altar, with offerings of flowers, candles, candy bars, glasses of water, sometimes food, given to the santos, saints, like Santa Clara, and to my grandmother’s deceased sister, Celia. Some of my mother’s Puertoriqueña and Cubana friends also kept elaborate altars that included fruit, sometimes cigars, shot glasses of rum, and statues of Catholic saints and African Orishas, deities. I was fascinated by these altars.  

Sometimes, during a walk through the more wooded areas of Central Park, I would see remnants of what appeared as ritual animal sacrifices and offerings. And, while I experienced simultaneous fear and attraction to what I was seeing, until I began to read about Santeria, I was not sure what I was observing.

The trappings of Santeria were not uncommon when I was growing up. There were a number of botanicas, herbal shops, in my neighborhood; an essential part of Santeria rituals is the use of herbs, roots, flowers and plants. Santos and Deities, both Catholic and African were displayed in the shop windows, along with collares/elekes, necklaces. The inside of some botanicas had a strong energy felt from the moment one stepped inside. One thing that always attracted me though, were the statues of African Deities, dressed for battle or emerging from the water with dolphins swimming about. My favorite, was la sirena, the mermaid, later I learned that she was Yemaya, Goddess of the oceans, and my special Goddess as I am a Pisces.

During my high school years, I traveled around the city, learning more about Santeria, the Orishas, the use of the elements in healing rituals, different types of magick, and the role of the Santero, the shaman, to whom I could go should I need a problem resolved.

Many years later in San Francisco, as I browsed in a bookshop, I came across a book on Santeria, written in Spanish by Migene Gonzalez-Wippler (1973). It was meant to be on that shelf for me, and for years I would read it many times, practicing what I had learned.  I had become a solo Santeria adherent with no formal training. Just Migene’s book and continued research. My altar grew with Catholic saints and African Gods. Little did I know that I was now on the pagan path.

So what is Santeria?

The Orishas venerated in Santeria are of West African and Congo basin origin, specifically from the Yoruba culture of southwestern Nigeria. Yoruba speaking slaves were brought to the isles of the Caribbean in the 16th century by the Spanish to work the plantations. Slaves were forced to convert to Christianity and their beliefs in Yoruba Deities were forbidden by the Spanish. But as conquered people will do to ensure cultural survival, the slaves superimposed the Catholic Saints on their Yoruba Deities, and in this way continued to honor for example, Shango under the guise of Santa Barbara, Saint Barbara.

Santeria, is an Afro-Caribbean religious cult, a blend of African religion and Christianity, a tradition handed down verbally from generation to generation. Santeria developed through  descendants of Yoruba African slaves, and today the cult has adherents throughout the Americans, in particular the Caribbean. One could say that because of the number of slaves brought to Cuba, a former colony of Spain, and the high numbers of Afro-Cubans on the island, Santeria is more prevalent than Catholicism, remaining the primary religion of mestizos –  products of intermarriage between the colonizers, Africans, and the indigenous who remained on the island — and black working class Cubans (Clark, 2007).   Santeria is also very much alive in areas in the U.S. with large populations of Puertoriqueños and Cubanos, in for example, New York City, and Miami.

Santeria is part of the pagan world, and anyone observing or practicing Santeria rituals can see the overlap with other pagan traditions — honoring of pre-Christian Deities, the use of the elements in its rituals, and solitary practice with each person discovering  his or her personal Orisha.  So, my persistence paid off, I have added Orishas to the pantheon of Saints, Gods and Goddesses that are very much part of my daily life, worship, and protection. I am also fortunate in being part of a Coven that accepts diversity, without admonishment.

References

Clark, M.A. (2007). Santeria: Correcting the myths and uncovering the realities of a growing religion. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Cunningham, S. (1996). Wicca: A guide for the solitary practitioner. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn.

Gonzalez-Wippler, M. (1973). Santeria: Magia Africana en Latinoamerica. Bronx, NY: Original Publications

Higginbotham, J. & R. (2012). Paganism: An introduction to earth centered religions.  Woodbury, MN: Llewellyn.

Luna Llena is a writer and eclectic solitary practitioner residing in New Mexico.

Printables For Children

If your child is older then preschool and you would like us to post some age appropriate please leave a comment below with the age of your child and some idea of what kind of printables you would like to see. I cannot guarantee we can find exactly what you are looking for but we will try to.

A Suggestion for parents: Get a folder or something your child can put the printables and other writing on what you are teach them and help them to bless it as their first Book of Shadows. Even a 3-ring binder would work if you have a hole punch.

These will be bigger once you print them out.

Pagan kids A

Pagan Kids B