Introduction to Ogham – First Aicme

Witches Of The Craft®

First Aicme

The most familiar Ogham system in use today is the Tree Ogham. The Tree Ogham is split up into; eight Chieftain Trees, eight peasant trees and eight shrub trees. In lessons two through five we will take a look at each group of five and their associations. We can develop a deeper understanding of each letter by understanding its connections with each tree.

1st Aicme

Ogham Symbol Sound/Letter Name Associated Tree


Beith – pronounced (BETH)        Birch (Betula pendula Roth)

Beth (BEH), birch – The silver birch is the most common birch in much of Europe. It is one of the first trees to colonize an area after a mature forest is harvested; this is probably a large part of its symbolic connection with new beginnings. It grows up to 100 feet high, but is more often found in spreading clumps on sandy soils. The common…

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Introduction to Ogham – Second Aicme

Witches Of The Craft®

Second Aicme

hÚath (OO-ah)      Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.)

Huath (HOO-ah), hawthorn – Like willows, hawthorns have many species in Europe, and they are not always easy to tell apart. All are thorny shrubs in the Rose family (Rosaceae), and most have whitish or pinkish flowers. The common hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna)
and midland hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata) are both widespread.

They are common in abandoned fields and along the edges of forests. Both are cultivated in North America, as are several native and Asiatic hawthorns.

Hawthorn is a druid sacred herb which is associated with the Summer Solstice.

Hawthorn is the classic flower used to decorate a maypole as it is considered to be a herb of
fertility. At one time Beltain was once reckoned as the day the hawthorn first bloomed.

Hawthorn is sacred to the fairies, and is part of the tree fairy triad of Britain “Oak, Ash and…

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Introduction to Ogham – Third Aicme

Witches Of The Craft®

Introduction to Ogham – Third Aicme

Muin (MUHN)                    vine (Rubus fruticosa)

Muin (MUHN, like “foot”), blackberry* In Ireland Muin refers to the Bramble or Blackberry shrub, which grows wild along every hedgerow in Ireland it has a prickly spreading vine system and fruits in September a rich fruity wine can be made from the fruits.

The Vine is considered one of the Chieftain trees of the Ogham. Its attributes involve Inner
development. Vine is considered a tree of reincarnation and eternal life due to the spiraling
pattern of its growth. The Blackberry vine is often used in healing and money spells.

Gort (GORT)                Ivy (Hedera helix)

Gort (GORT), ivy – Ivy is also a vine, growing to 100 feet long in beech woods and around
human habitations, where it is widely planted as a…

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Introduction to Ogham – 4th. Aicme

Witches Of The Craft®

Introduction to Ogham – 4th. Aicme

Ailm (AHL-m)              Silver Fir (Abies spp.)

Ailm (AHL-m) elm * In Ireland Ailm refers to the elm (Ulmus procera) which grows all
over Ireland.

The Silver Fir is known as the Birth Tree. It was the original Christmas tree from central Europe. The needles are burned at childbirth to bless and protect the mother and baby.

Burn Silver Fir for Happiness; Harmony; Peace; Inspiration; and Wisdom.

To a witch, the cones, warn of wet weather and foretells when a dry season approaches. Its
cones respond to the environment by opening with the sun and closing with rain.

It offers a clear perception of the present and the future, its wood is used for shape-shifting
and magic involving change.

Onn (UHN) Furze, or Gorse (Ulex europaeus)

Onn (UHN), furze – Furze, or gorse, is a thorny shrub growing to…

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