Áine – Midsummer’s Celtic Faerie Goddess

Áine was both a Celtic Goddess and a Faerie Queen. She has been known by other names, such as the Lady of the Lake, the Goddess of the Earth and Nature, and the Goddess of Luck and Magick. As well, there are some people who actually believe that she might be an aspect of The Morrigan.

Áine was one of the most beautiful, feminine, and powerful Celtic goddesses and was one of the many goddesses that the Christian monks sought to do away with, mostly because of her many relations with men. Because of this Aine is not heard much of in the bardic literature, but she is still very prominent in the folk-lore of the neighborhood. She is known in some parts of Ireland as the Fairy Queen of Munster. Also, in the Irish legends we find in her son Earl an archetype of Lancelot in the later Arthurian legends, while Aine Herself is the Lady of the Lake.

In Celtic mythology, Áine (“awnya”) is a goddess of summer, wealth, sovereignty, love, growth and cattle. She is a Sun Goddess and the feast of Midsummer Night was held in her honor, for at midsummer, farmers would walk through their fields and wave their torches, in the hope that Áine and her sacred fire might grant them an abundant harvest. They also burnt flowers and straw, as another way of honoring Áine, in the hope that she might grant them freedom from illness and evil throughout another turn of the Wheel of the Year. She is sometimes represented by a red mare.

Áine is symbolized by brightness, glow, joy, radiance, splendor, glory, magic, popularity and even fame. She is sometimes mistakenly equaled to Danu, because her name is somewhat similar to Anu. However, these are not the same Goddess.

To read the rest of this article please click on the following link: Áine – Midsummer’s Celtic Faerie Goddess

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