A Chuckle to Start or Continue the Weekend Along with A Thought for Today

Remember we do not always have to be serious when doing magick. When doing crafts such as making Brigid Crosses can be a fun time for the whole family. If you are talking about positive things and/or joking around this puts more positive energy into whatever craft you are making or yummy you are cooking or baking. A little hint: be sure to have some cooking sage in your spices at all times. Bless it to help cleanse negativity from whoever eats a tiny bit of it. Then stir a pinch into anything you cook or bake, this will not change the flavor of the items but it will help cleanse someone of negativity.  Make sure to use it if there has been any arguing or other negative interactions with people in your home or if someone comes home grumpy or complaining about their day or if someone is feeling down or ….well I think you get any time someone has a negative outlook use the cooking sage to help the person or persons feel better.

Blessed be dear ones.

Some Images of Brigid or Brighid and Links to More Information

These images come from bing.com. To see more images of the goddess Brigid or Brighid please click on this link: Brigid Triple Goddess  Irish Goddess Brigid

This images com from bing.com to see more symbols related to Brigid please click on this link: Brigid Symbols

 

To learn how to make Brigid/Brighid cross please click on this link: How to Make a Brigid/Brighid Cross

To read other articles about Brigid/Brighid please click on any of these links: Brigid/Brighid and Sabbat Imbolc  Celtic Goddess Brigid/Brighid  Celtic Goddess and Catholic Saint

On the Sabbat Imbolc (Celebrated on February 2nd in the Northern Hemisphere and on August 1st in the Southern Hemisphere) also called Candlemas the Goddess Brigid is celebrated by many by making candles for home and magical usage. Here is a link to a general search for Imbolc: Imbolc a.k.a. Candlemas

If you are interested in learning some ways to make your own candles please put the word “Candle” in the search box on our Homepage. You will probably have to scroll through and click on “Older Posts” to find the information you want. Also here is a link of a general search for different ways of candle making: Candle Making at Home

Youtube videos on candle making: Candle Making Videos

WARNING: Candle making can be very dangerous. Please pick a time you will not be disturbed by anyone in the kitchen while working with the very hot wax. I recommend children under the age of 12 years old do not help with the candle making in any way as a safety precaution.

 

Brighid, the Hearth Goddess of Ireland

In Irish mythological cycles, Brighid (or Brighit), whose name is derived from the Celtic brig or “exalted one”, is the daughter of the Dagda, and therefore one of the Tuatha de Dannan. Her two sisters were also called Brighid, and were associated with healing and crafts. The three Brighids were typically treated as three aspects of a single deity, making her a classic Celtic triple goddess.

Brighid was the patron of poets and bards, as well as healers and magicians. She was especially honored when it came to matters of prophecy and divination. She was honored with a sacred flame maintained by a group of priestesses, and her sanctuary at Kildare, Ireland, later became the home of the Christian variant of Brighid, St. Brigid of Kildare. Kildare is also the location of one of several sacred wells in the Celtic regions, many of which are connected to Brighid. Even today, it’s not uncommon to see ribbons and other offerings tied to trees near a well as a petition to this healing goddess.

To read the rest of this article please click on this linkBrighid, Hearth Goddess

Celtic Goddess Brigid and the Story of the Enduring Deity

Over the centuries, the stories of two women named Brigid (or Brigit or Bride or Brighid) have become intertwined in an intricate Celtic knot of myth and miracle. The Celtic Goddess Brigid and the Catholic Saint Brigid of Kildare both personified similar spiritual practices of their times in Ireland. Many scholars believe that the two are the same mythological person. The saint was necessary to mollify the native Irish population while not falling within the realm of worship of Pagan gods and goddesses. The transition from goddess to saint allowed Brigid to survive throughout the Christianizing world. At this time, the worship of a pantheon of gods – and any religious or spiritual belief system that existed outside of Christianity – was no longer acceptable in Europe.

Celtic Goddess Brigid

The Celtic goddess Brigid is one of the most venerated deities in the Pagan Irish pantheon. The name Brigid means exalted one, while her most ancient Gaelic name, Breo-Saighead, means fiery power or fiery arrow. As a solar goddess, she embodies the element of fire and is commonly depicted with rays of light or fire emanating from her head. Irish mythology relates that she was born at sunrise of Dagda, the earth god, and Boann, the goddess of fertility. They belonged to an ancient tribe of gods, called Tuatha Dé Danann (people of the Goddess Danu), who practiced magic. After they lost their mysterious islands in the west, they traveled to Ireland in the misty clouds and settled there.

When Brigid was born she had flames shooting out from her head, and through them, she was united with the cosmos. As a baby, Brigid drank the milk of a sacred cow that came from the spirit world.

Fiery Aspects…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Celtic Goddess Brigid

Brigid: Survival Of A Goddess

I am She
that is the natural
mother of all things,
mistress and governess
of all the elements,
the initial progeny of worlds,
chief of the powers divine,
Queen of all that are in the otherworld,
the principal of them
that dwell above,
manifested alone
and under one form
of all the Gods and Goddesses.

– Lucius Apuleius

Perhaps one of the most complex and contradictory Goddesses of the Celtic pantheon, Brigid can be seen as the most powerful religious figure in all of Irish history. Many layers of separate traditions have intertwined, making Her story and impact complicated but allowing Her to move so effortlessly down through the centuries. She has succeeded in travelling intact through generations, fulfilling different roles in divergent times.

She was, and continues to be, known by many names. Referred to as Bride, Bridey, Brighid, Brigit, Briggidda, Brigantia, I am using Her name, Brigid, here. There are also many variations on pronunciation, all of them correct, but, in my own mind, I use the pronunciation, Breet.

Brigid is the traditional patroness of healing, poetry and smithcraft, which are all practical and inspired wisdom. As a solar deity Her attributes are light, inspiration and all skills associated with fire. Although She might not be identified with the physical Sun, She is certainly the benefactress of inner healing and vital energy.

Also long known as The Mistress of the Mantle,…

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Brigid: Survival of A Goddess