This Is Witchcraft: That Which Cannot Be Named

Something Worth Witching For.

To attempt to define witchcraft is like trying to capture smoke or bottle moonlight.  It is constantly changing, shifting and evading definition.  Just when we think we have captured its essence another veil is lifted only to reveal a deeper mystery.  The answer to this question will never suffice to capture what witchcraft is in its entirety.  Any verbal or written definition will be superficial; a finite container attempting to contextualize something infinite.  Even the most eloquent descriptions of the art of witchcraft leave something to be desired.  Human language, especially English, does not have the nuance to capture something that can only be experienced.

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The Practice of Esoteric Herbalism

When many people begin exploring the world of magic, myth and legend one of the first places they turn to is plant magic.  There are hundreds of resources on plant based practices, herbalism, and the creation of botanical preparations for both healing and ritual.  Some people are interested in the chemical components of plants, others look to their astrological and elemental correspondences or the large body of plant folklore.  There are numerous authors that write on the many different facets of plant based practices, and there are still many that are yet to be explored.  New ways of working with ancient plants are being revealed and practitioners are finding that there are new plants waiting to be discovered and worked with.  The practice and process of esoteric herbalism is about exploring the subtle nature of plants and how they can be worked with in a ritual setting.  Plants can open us up to new insights about ourselves and the world around us, and act as magical catalysts that enhance our own working through their unique combination of energies.

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Lunar Herb: Evening Primrose

Plants of the Moon

Lunar herbs help us connect with the energy of the Moon, bringing its influence into magic and rituals.  The moon plays a prominent role in the spiritual practices of Pagans and Witches alike.  It is described as being feminine in nature due to its connections to water and the subconscious, as well as its correlation to the twenty-eight day cycle of the menstrual period.  The moon has a major influence over men and women here on Earth, its waxing and waning tides directly influencing how we feel, the way we express our emotions, and how we relate to others.  The moon also represents mystery, occultism, the sub-conscious and the dream world.  Mythologically it is associated with a number of goddesses both dark and light.  The moon also has this dual nature, during its waxing cycle its energy is building making it a powerful time to manifest our desires and reflect our light back out into the world around us.

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What if Love is Not the Law?

I’ve heard the phrase “love is the law” thrown around a lot in Witchcraft and Pagan circles. I’ve never really understood why we Witches hold on to this phrase. It doesn’t really feel like it belongs here. For a long time I’ve wondered what if love is not the law? Does that change the practice of Witchcraft?

Whose Law?

“Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law” and “Love is the Law, love under will” are the original phrases coined in the writings of Aleister Crowley. These concepts don’t originate in Wicca, and really, they don’t originate with Crowley either, but he did bring them to the forefront of esoteric teaching in this writings Liber AL. These concepts are the main beliefs in Thelema. And, perhaps unsurprising, there are years and years of debate on what these ‘rules’ actually mean.

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Ancient Egypt God and Goddesses Family Tree

There are many representations of Ancient Egyptian Deities family trees. Here I am showing you just one of many and it contains most of the ancient gods and goddesses.

I got this from bing.com as I have been doing with all the pictures for us to get to Know some of the Egyptian Goddesses and Gods better. Here is the link to the general search I did on there for the family tree. This link will take you to the page where they have the family trees broken down even further for each splinter family group : Ancient Egypt Gods and Goddesses Family Trees

I have enjoyed bring you more information this past week on the Ancient Egyptian Pantheon. If you would like to do more exploring on your own especially for the gods and/or goddesses not presents in the articles here are two very informative sites you should look at Ancient Egypt Online – Religion in Ancient Egypt: The Gods and Goddesses  and/or Ancient Egypt Online – The Ancient Egyptian Gods  Both links also have other information about Ancient Egypt you may find interesting.

 

 

The Places of Sun Worship in Ancient Egypt

The sun god Re, or Ra, was the predominant deity in ancient Egypt. The young sun god begins his dawn voyage in his boat over the ocean of heaven, is full-grown by the moment of the high-noon sun and sets in the west as an old man, the god Atum. By the time of the fifth dynasty, pharaohs were considered to be the divine, direct descendants of the sun god and they built cities and temples to emphasize their divinity.

Monotheism and Akehtaten

Egyptians were polytheistic, with Ra holding pride of place as the chief deity. But Amenhotep, royal consort of the legendary Nefertiti, belonged to a cult that believed the sun god created himself and then brought about the rest of creation and the other gods. Amenhotep embraced monotheism, smashed the idols of the other gods and regarded himself as a distinctive son of Ra, also known as Aten, the “Great Disc” of illumination. The pharaoh built a new capital, a city called Akhetaten, and changed his name to Akhenaten in honor of Ra. When he died, Tutankhamen, his successor, was faced with a catastrophic economic collapse and severe unrest, partly attributable to the suppressed traditional religion. King Tut restored the rest of the gods to their temples and to active worship and Akhetaten was abandoned, eventually buried under the desert sand.

To read the rest of this article please click on this link: Ra – Sun God

Ra

Ra is the ancient Egyptian sun god. He is the father of the gods and is usually depicted with the body of a human and the head of a falcon.

The ancient Egyptians revered Ra as the god who created everything. Also known as the Sun God, Ra was a powerful deity and a central god of the Egyptian pantheon. The ancient Egyptians worshiped Ra more than any other god and pharaohs often connected themselves with Ra in their efforts to be seen as the earthly embodiment of the Sun God.

Ra | The Sun God of Egypt

The ancient Egyptians revered Ra as the god who created everything. Also known as the Sun God, Ra was a powerful deity and a central god of the Egyptian pantheon. The ancient Egyptians worshiped Ra more than any other god and pharaohs often connected themselves with Ra in their efforts to be seen as the earthly embodiment of the Sun God.

Who is Ra?

Ra (pronounced ray) represents sunlight, warmth and growth. It was only natural that the ancient Egyptians would believe him to be the creator of the world, as well as part of him being represented in every other god. The ancient Egyptians believed that every god should illustrate some aspect of him, while Ra himself should also represent every god.

Ra’s Appearance

Ra was usually depicted in human form. He had a falcon head which is crowned with a sun disc. This sun disc was encircled by a sacred cobra named Uraeus. Ra has also been depicted as a man with the head of a beetle and also a human man with the head of a ram. The ancients also depicted Ra in full species form such as a serpent, heron, bull, lion, cat, ram, hawk, beetle, phoenix and others. His main symbol, however, is the sun disk.

To read the rest of this article please click on the blue name of RA at the beginning of this post.

Ra

Ra (Re) was the primary name of the sun god of Ancient Egypt. He was often considered to be the King of the Gods and thus the patron of the pharaoh and one of the central gods of the Egyptian pantheon. He was also described as the creator of everything. Ra was so powerful and popular and his worship was so enduring that some modern commentators have argued that the Egyptian religion was in fact a form of veiled monotheism with Ra as the one god. This seems to be somewhat of an overstatement, but underlines his primary position within religious texts throughout Egyptian history.

It is sometimes proposed that the pyramids represent the rays of light extending from the sun and thus these great monuments connected the king with Ra. The Egyptians also built solar temples in honour of Ra. Unlike the standard type of Egyptian temple, these temples were open to the sunlight and did not feature a statue of the god because he was represented by the sunlight itself. Instead the temple centred on an obelisk and altar. The most significant early solar temple is thought to be the one erected in Heliopolis, sometimes known as “Benu-Phoenix”. Its location was thought to be the spot where Ra first emerged at the beginning of creation, and the city took its name (“Iwn”) from the word for a pillar.

To read the rest of this article about Ra please click on this link: RA