FESTIVALS AND CELEBRATIONS

“The notations of the Celtic year belong to the Christian period, old style. If there are any traces of Pagan times they are only such as are to be gathered from a few names and ceremonies. The four seasons are known as earrach, spring, samhradh, summer, fogharadh, harvest, and geamhradh, winter….There can be no doubt the origins of the names belong to a period anterior to Christianity.” ~John Gregorson Campbell~Indeed earrach is derived from ear, meaning the head or front, also the east. Samhradh is from samh, the sun. Fogharadh is from fogh, meaning hospitality and abundance. Geamhradh is connected to geamhtach, meaning stiff, thick, binding, and thus sees tied-in with the idea of snow and ice.

With the Scottish Quarter Days differing from the English Quarter Days, F. Marian McNeill concludes that “Scotland follows the ancient customs of the Celtic peoples, and England that of non-Celtic peoples of Europe.” The Scottish Quarter Days are as follows: FEBRUARY 2 – CANDLEMAS MAY 15 – WHITSUN or OLD BHEALLTAINN AUGUST 1 – LAMMAS NOVEMBER 11 – MARTINMAS, or OLD HALLOWMAS

The ancient Celtic year started on the eve of November 1. Then in 527 C.E., this was changed and New Year’s Day was declared to be March 25. Almost a thousand years later this was changed again to January 1. In Scotland it wasn’t until 1600 that New Year’s Day was first celebrated on January 1. The PectiWita, in common with many Witches, still celebrate the start of the year at Samhuinn, though their Samhuinn is November 11 rather than November 1.

The calendar, festivals, customs, and celebrations can become very complicated, especially when you start studying the changes that have taken place over the centuries. But the PectiWita celebrated only on those festivals/dates which were important to them. These were: SAMHUINN – NOVEMBER 11 YULE – DECEMBER 22 (Feill Fionnain) BEALLTAINN – MAY 15 MIDSUMMER – JULY 5 (Feill-Sheathain) 

I would like to point out here that there are rituals described for each of these festivals and celebrations, but do to the length and amount of space it would take, I have omitted them. I am sure the “Old Ones” would understand if you read about it and improvised. Make your own rituals. Be creative and keep them in mind.To read this rest of this article please click on this link: Scottish Festivals 

Advertisements

One thought on “FESTIVALS AND CELEBRATIONS

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.