History of the Ogham Language

HISTORY OF THE OGHAM LANGUAGE
ogham alphabetogham stoneThe ancient Ogham script (pronounced ‘oh-am’) is most often found on Ogham stones that date back to the third century. Most examples of the writing is found on Ogham stones of which there are over 350 found mostly in southern Ireland as well as in Scotland, the Isle of Man, Cornwall and Wales.

The transition to the use of the Roman alphabet took place about the sixth century. Most examples of Ogham writing confer the name of person that they represent, thus the stones are often memorial symbols.

To read the rest of this article please click on the following link: History Ogham Langage

FESTIVALS AND CELEBRATIONS

“The notations of the Celtic year belong to the Christian period, old style. If there are any traces of Pagan times they are only such as are to be gathered from a few names and ceremonies. The four seasons are known as earrach, spring, samhradh, summer, fogharadh, harvest, and geamhradh, winter….There can be no doubt the origins of the names belong to a period anterior to Christianity.” ~John Gregorson Campbell~Indeed earrach is derived from ear, meaning the head or front, also the east. Samhradh is from samh, the sun. Fogharadh is from fogh, meaning hospitality and abundance. Geamhradh is connected to geamhtach, meaning stiff, thick, binding, and thus sees tied-in with the idea of snow and ice.

With the Scottish Quarter Days differing from the English Quarter Days, F. Marian McNeill concludes that “Scotland follows the ancient customs of the Celtic peoples, and England that of non-Celtic peoples of Europe.” The Scottish Quarter Days are as follows: FEBRUARY 2 – CANDLEMAS MAY 15 – WHITSUN or OLD BHEALLTAINN AUGUST 1 – LAMMAS NOVEMBER 11 – MARTINMAS, or OLD HALLOWMAS

The ancient Celtic year started on the eve of November 1. Then in 527 C.E., this was changed and New Year’s Day was declared to be March 25. Almost a thousand years later this was changed again to January 1. In Scotland it wasn’t until 1600 that New Year’s Day was first celebrated on January 1. The PectiWita, in common with many Witches, still celebrate the start of the year at Samhuinn, though their Samhuinn is November 11 rather than November 1.

The calendar, festivals, customs, and celebrations can become very complicated, especially when you start studying the changes that have taken place over the centuries. But the PectiWita celebrated only on those festivals/dates which were important to them. These were: SAMHUINN – NOVEMBER 11 YULE – DECEMBER 22 (Feill Fionnain) BEALLTAINN – MAY 15 MIDSUMMER – JULY 5 (Feill-Sheathain) 

I would like to point out here that there are rituals described for each of these festivals and celebrations, but do to the length and amount of space it would take, I have omitted them. I am sure the “Old Ones” would understand if you read about it and improvised. Make your own rituals. Be creative and keep them in mind.To read this rest of this article please click on this link: Scottish Festivals 

Witches Are Real And Here’s What They Look Like

Photographer Katarzyna Majakdiscovered a whole new side of Poland when she set out to explore her own spirituality.

It turns out there are lots of modern-day witches, who practice a collection of non-traditional religious and spiritual practices including spiritual healing, shamanism, Wicca, Druidism, and other revivals of Pagan traditions. (Witches are found in the U.S. too, with an estimated 1.2 million people following Pagan beliefs.)

Majak shared a few of these “women of power” with us. Check out more of her work at the Porter Contemporary Gallery.

Over 90% of Poland is Catholic. Because of the country’s conservative values, many women pursue witchcraft and other pagan traditions as an outlet for an alternative spirituality.

To continue reading…….