The Triple Goddess The Original Holy Trinity

The Triple Goddess is a term first popularised by the poet and scholar Robert Graves in the 20th century. He depicted the triplicity as Maiden, Mother and Crone and many neo-pagans have followed this imagery. While some scholars attributed the idea to the lively imagination of the poet, recent archaeology has made it abundantly clear that “Goddess Triplicities” are to be found throughout ancient Europe.

In Hinduism today, the triplicity of the Goddess in Shakta worship is of cardinal importance, and outside the Indo-European world the Triple Goddess is found in Africa and Asia.

How should the devotee of Our Mother God understand this universal image?

While many of us contemplate the single image of Our Mother, there has always been an important Trinitarian aspect to Her worship. Ironically the great Christian theologian, St. Augustine, mocked the pagans for their belief that the Triple Goddess could be One and also Three. After his conversion he found himself defending the masculinised version of the same doctrine!

There are, as usual, various patriarchal stumbling-blocks to avoid. The most prominent is the attempt to assimilate all three aspects of Dea to the moon. This, of course, comes from the early patriarchal phenomenon that archaeologists call “solarisation” – the process of re-assigning the higher (Solar and Celestial) symbolism to the masculine image and leaving the feminine with the lower (Lunar and Earthly) aspects.

Actually, the lunar aspect of the Trinity is the Daughter, and the contrast between the Solar Mother and Lunar Daughter is one of the beautiful and powerful aspects of Trinitarian Déanism.

The Thealogy of the Triple Goddess…

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