Imbloc Gathering

imbolc

Anyone is welcomed to join us!

WHEN:

Monday, February 1, 2016

TIME:

6:00 to 7:00 PM CT

The Sacred Circle starts at 6:15 PM CT SHARP. Please be considerate and be on time or wait until 7:00 PM CT to join us for visiting after the circle has been opened!

WHERE:

Coven Life Chat Room

For information on how to find and get into the chat room or to figure out your local time please check out the banner on the left side of Coven Life Home Page.

PLAN FOR THE CIRCLE

Plan for the gathering will be posted at least one week before the gathering.

Just because it says coven does not mean you have to be in the coven to attend. All Pagans are welcome to join us! If you have any questions about the gathering please email stregga@ I look forward to many of us coming together to celebrate this wonderful Sabbat.

Legends and Folklore of Bread

When Lammas, or Lughnasadh, rolls around, many modern Pagans celebrate the harvest of the grain crops. This is nothing new – for our ancestors, the grain harvest was a cause for great celebration. A successful harvest meant families would be able to bake and store bread through the winter – and that could mean the difference between life and death for many. The word “Lammas” comes from the Old English phrase hlaf-maesse, which translates to “loaf mass.” Today, it’s not uncommon to find a celebration of bread at a Pagan festival during the Lammas season. There are a number of different ways that bread itself can be incorporated into a ritual or magical setting. Let’s look at some of the magical folklore surrounding bread in different cultures and societies.

Bread and the Divine

Grain has held a place of importance in civilization back nearly to the beginning of time. Grain became associated with the cycle of death and rebirth. The Sumerian god Tammuz was slain and his lover Ishtar grieved so heartily that nature stopped producing. Ishtar mourned Tammuz, and followed him to the Underworld to bring him back, similar to the story of Demeter and Persephone.

In Greek legend, the grain god was Adonis. Two goddesses, Aphrodite and Persephone, battled for his love. To end the fighting, Zeus ordered Adonis to spend six months with Persephone in the Underworld, and the rest with Aphrodite.

Spirits of the Grain…

To read the rest of this article by Patty Wigington click on this link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/LammasFolklore/a/Legends-And-Folklore-Of-Bread.htm

Lammas History: Welcoming the Harvest

The Beginning of the Harvest:

At Lammas, also called Lughnasadh, the hot days of August are upon us, much of the earth is dry and parched, but we still know that the bright reds and yellows of the harvest season are just around the corner. Apples are beginning to ripen in the trees, our summer vegetables have been picked, corn is tall and green, waiting for us to come gather the bounty of the crop fields. Now is the time to begin reaping what we have sown, and gathering up the first harvests of grain, wheat, oats, and more. This holiday can be celebrated either as a way to honor the god Lugh, or as a celebration of the harvest.

Celebrating Grain in Ancient Cultures:

Grain has held a place of importance in civilization back nearly to the beginning of time. Grain became associated with the cycle of death and rebirth. The Sumerian god Tammuz was slain and his lover Ishtar grieved so heartily that nature stopped producing. Ishtar mourned Tammuz, and followed him to the Underworld to bring him back, similar to the story of Demeter and Persephone.

For more information and the rest of this article by Patty Wigington click on this link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/lammas/p/History_Lammas.htm

Prayers for Imbolc

If you’re looking for prayers or blessings to celebrate the Sabbat of Imbolc, here’s where you’ll find a selection of devotionals that bid farewell to the winter months and honor the goddess Brighid, as well as seasonal blessings for your meals, hearth and home.

Brighid’s Fire Meal Blessing

The goddess Brighid is well known as a keeper of the hearthfires in the home. As such, she is often associated with matters of domesticity, including cooking and kitchen magic. If you’re prepped a meal and you’re getting ready to dig in, take a moment to bless your food in Brighid’s name. More »

Prayer to Brighid as the Bride of Earth

In many modern Pagan traditions, the Imbolc sabbat is a time to celebrateBrighid, the Celtic hearth goddess. Among her many other aspects, she is known as the Bride of Earth, and is the patroness of domesticity and home. This simple prayer honors her in that role. More »

For other prayers for Imbloc by Patty Wigington click on this link: http://paganwiccan.about.com/od/imbolcprayers/tp/Prayers-for-Imbolc.htm