Flower Magic: The Secret Language Of The Flowers

There are many things that were known only about a hundred years ago that have become lost, and the secret language of the flowers is one of them. In days gone by it was held an important part of women’s education to know home remedies, about the qualities of plants and this had a large metaphysical component.

Just knowing that there is a secret language of flowers changes many things; and of course has many applications in practical as well as esoteric magic and energy magic.

Right up to Victorian times, the meaning of flowers was common knowledge amongst people and was used to transmit messages and information.

In this painting which looks so harmless to a modern Westerner and merely decorative, there is story told in flowers about the person who painted it, and the person for whom they painted it. That’s a second layer of information, invisible to those who are not in the know; because of this it is called the secret language of flowers.

If you look for it, you will find flowers everywhere – they appear seemingly harmlessly and randomly in portraits, in the background of stained glass windows in a church; they are carved in stone in palaces and temples; and often you will see a depiction of saints and important historical figures who are holding a flower, or are pointing to one.

On a visit to an old graveyard, you can tell the plants that were chosen to be on a person’s grave, using the secret language of flowers – and the vast majority of people walk right by and have no idea that all of that is going on.

Importantly, flowers were used to express emotions, especially in romantic relationships. Gentlemen would bring posies to the ladies; and the ladies would wear very specific flowers on their hats, or choose or make fabrics that would bear particular flower motives.

Any fabric pre-dating the Second World War has this language of flowers, this additional meaning and information, interwoven into its very structure; this is practical magic where intention is added to a natural existence and used intelligently in order to bring about a change in reality.Flower language magic sleep cushion

For example, if you put on a cushion a design that says in the language of flowers, “If you put your head on this cushion to rest, you will have sweet dreams of love, independence, freedom and joy,” that’s a pure piece of human magic or witchcraft at work. For people who actively practice the art of bringing intention into daily life and shaping their own destiny that way, the language of flowers, that secret layer of intention, energy and information, provides a dictionary of symbols that can be practically evoked in spells and rituals, in magic potions by adding the physical components of that particular flower to the spell.

If you learn the secret language of the flowers, you have a magical alphabet to make your own spells; this is how most of magic works, you don’t learn a bunch of spells and ingredients by heart, but instead, you learn what the ingredients do and so you can mix and match for every occasion.

Flower language in a portrait - a picture that says more ...For example, one of the only surviving flower language symbols is that of the red rose for romantic love. People might nowadays have absolutely no idea what a bluebell was meant to mean only a hundred years ago, or even what a Valerian flower looks like, never mind where you could find one or what its flower language message is, but it is still known that a red rose means love.

Knowing that, you can add the petals of a red rose to any love potion that has a physical/sexual strand to it; and also to any other type of potion where a physical/sexual strand would add a bit of va va voom to the spell in question.

As always, knowing even a little bit about magic opens your eyes, ears and your other senses to the simple fact that there is more to life than the dour ones would have us believe.

Wondering what was said about this lady in the portrait here by the flowers makes meeting with this image in a whole new way. Modern science will have us believe that our ancestors were all a bunch of idiots who believed in superstitious nonsense and that there is no such thing as the invisible worlds of energy and information.

I’m afraid they are the fools; and it’s a shame because the world becomes a much more interesting place when you pay attention and find out about such things as the secret language of the flowers, and how this has been used throughout the ages of mankind to tell us things most people now will never understand.

And if you make the secret language of the flowers your own, you can do many interesting, inspiring and wonderful things with that – even if it’s just choosing a wallpaper that has the right flowers for your purposes on it, and smiling every day when you see it again.

Below is a very short version of the secret language of flowers; for a much more comprehensive flower language dictionary from A-Z with a search function and a reverse list so you can decide the quality/meaning you need and then look up the right flower or plant, go here:

See the complete “Secret Language Of The Flowers” here.

Wishing you much joy with The Secret Language Of The Flowers,

SFX

Spring 2011

Flower Language: The Secret Language Of Flowers
See the complete “Secret Language Of The Flowers” here.

Amaranthus Immortal
Amaryllis Beautiful, but timid
Aster, double Variety
Aster, single Afterthought
Arbutus Thee only do I love
Acacia Friendship
Apple Blossom Preference
Asphodel Remembered after death
Arbor Vitæ (Tree of Life) Unchanging friendship
Alyssum Worth beyond beauty
Anemone Your love changes
Azalea Pleasant recollections
Argeratum Worth beyond beauty
Balsam Impatience
Blue Bell Constancy
Balm Pleasantry
Bay I change but in death
Bachelor’s Button Hope
Begonia Deformed
Buttercup Memories of childhood
Brier, Sweet Envy
Calla Feminine Modesty
Carnation Pride
Clematis Mental Excellence
Cypress Disappointment, Despair
Crocus Happiness
Columbine I cannot give thee up
Cresses Always cheerful
Canterbury Bell Constancy
Cereus, Night-blooming Transient beauty
Candytuft Indifference
Chrysanthemum Heart left desolate
Clover, White I promise
Clover, Four-leaved Be mine
Crown Imperial Authority
Camellia Spotless purity
Cissus Changeable
Centaurea Your looks deceive me
Cineraria Singleness of heart
Daisy, Field I will think of it
Dahlia Dignity
Daffodil Unrequited love
Dandelion Coquetry
Everlasting Always remembered
Everlasting Pea Wilt thou go with me
Ebony Blackness
Fuchsia Humble love
Foxglove Insincerity
Fern Sincerity
Fennel Strength
Forget-me-not For ever remembered
Fraxinella Fire
Geranium, Ivy Fond of dancing
Geranium, Oak A melancholy mind
Geranium, Rose I prefer you
Geranium, Scarlet Stillness
Gladiolus Ready armed
Golden Rod Encouragement
Gillyflower Promptness
Hyacinth Benevolence
Honeysuckle Devoted love
House Leek Domestic economy
Heliotrope I adore you
Hibiscus Delicate beauty
Hollyhock Ambition
Hydrangea Vain glory
Ice Plant Your looks freeze me
Ivy Friendship
Iris A message for thee
Jonquil Affection returned
Larkspur Fickleness
Lantana Rigor
Laurel Words may deceive
Lavender Mistrust
Lemon Blossom Discretion
Lady Slipper Capricious beauty
Lily of the Valley Return of happiness
Lily Passion
May Flower Welcome
Marigold Sacred affection
Marigold and Cypress Despair
Mandrake Rarity
Mignonette Your qualities surpass your charms
Morning Glory Coquetry, Affectation
Myrtle Love in absence
Mistletoe Insurmountable
Narcissus Egotism
Nasturtium Patriotism
Oxalis Reverie
Orange Blossom Purity
Olive Peace
Oleander Beware
Primrose Modest worth
Pink, White Pure love
Pink, Red Devoted love
Phlox Our hearts are united
Periwinkle Sweet memories
Pæony Ostentation
Pansy You occupy my thoughts
Poppy Oblivion
Rhododendron Agitation
Rose, Bud White Maiden love
Rose, Leaf I never trouble
Rose Moss Superior merit
Rose, Red I love you
Rose, Yellow Infidelity
Rosemary Remembrance
Sensitive Plant Modesty
Snowdrop Consolation
Sumach Pride and poverty
Sweet William Gallantry
Sunflower Lofty thought
Tuberose Purity of mind
Thyme Activity
Tulip Declaration of love
Verbena Sensibility
Violet, Blue Faithfulness
Wall Flower Fidelity in misfortune
Wisteria Close friendship
Yucca Your looks pierce me
Yew Sadness
Zinnia I mourn your absence
See the complete“Secret Language Of The Flowers”

A Little About January Birth Symbols

January Babies

“Little January, Tapped at my door today. And said, ‘Put on your winter wraps, And come outdoors to play.'” —Winifred C. MarshallZodiac: Capricorn until January 19 and Aquarius from January 20

Gemstone: Garnet
The garnet, from the Latin word granatum, means seed (think: pomegranate). The stone signifies eternal friendship and trust.

Flower: Carnation, Snowdrop
The carnation’s different hues suggest different meanings: red for love or pink for affection. Snowdrops imply hope and beauty.

Tree: Fir, Elm, Cypress

FROM: http://www.whattoexpect.com/pregnancy/photo-gallery/birth-signs-symbols#02

January’s birth flower, the carnation, comes in several different colors to convey different meanings, much like roses. A pink carnation means affection, while a red carnation means ‘I love you.’ White carnations mean pure love, striped carnations means regret that a love is not shared, and yellow means rejection or disappointment. The other January flower is thesnowdrop, which used to be considered bad luck due to the fact that it would always seem to appear to grow in graveyards. Nowadays, it signifies hope and beauty.

FROM: http://www.almanac.com/content/birth-month-flowers-and-their-meanings#

January Birthstone – Garnet

For those born in the month of January, the gemstone is garnet. Hindu religion will also recognize the serpent stone for this month, but for modern, Western society, the garnet is most familiar. Most people recognize this precious stone as a deep, almost blood red crystal. However, garnets can be found in brown, black, orange, pink, green, and yellow. With some more rare ones found with no color, though blues tend to be the most rare. Because they are more well-known for their red hue, the origin of the word, garnet, or, ´gernet´, is derived from Old English, meaning dark red. It has been adored for over five-thousand years. In Europe (where is was easily found), during the Victorian Ear, it was traditionally cut in the shape of a rose and linked with other delicately faceted gems.

Each month of the year brings in a new cycle. Each cycle represents a new season, has a renewed energy, and a new meaning. Throughout history, specific gemstones have been designated to symbolize our birth-month according to the Gregorian or Western Calendar. In the first century, a Jewish historian by the name of Josephus, stated there was a connection with the twelve stones on the breastplate of Aaron, and the twelve months of the year. In the earlier civilizations of Babylon and India, gemstones have been known to attribute magical properties in connection to their significance of the Zodiac calendar. It is believed that the gemstones for each month aligns with the season, our spiritual and mental energy, religion, magical powers, and even the power to aid in ailing health or allow us to maintain our health.

The Latin word “granatus”, meaning grain or seed, might make one think about the seeds of the pomegranate fruit. According to Greek mythology, Hades, god of the underworld, gifted Persephone a pomegranate before she returned to the earth to visit her mother, Demeter. As she had been a kidnapped goddess forced to be his queen, the gift of this fruit ensured that she would return to him safely after four months time.

In the Antique Roman period, garnets were also used to symbolize areas in which they had taken control. These stones were inlaid in cells of gold using the ´cloisonne´method, utilizing enamel to strengthen the inlay. The artifacts of what the Romans left behind have been found in Anglo-Saxon England to the Black Sea.

Some other interesting facts about the garnet: The darker, more opaque stones of the garnet family are used in ´garnet paper´as an abrasive, the favorite among cabinetmakers. When mixed with water and high pressure, they can also be used to cut steel. It is the state gemstone of Idaho and Arizona, but can be found in India, Russia, Africa, the rivers of Australia, and South America.

Garnets, the January birthstone, have been used to encourage a heightened sense of sensuality and sexuality, with Metaphysical properties strengthening regenerative powers of the body, commitment, and giving insight to healing thoughts.

More symbolically, as a gift it represents constancy, and it utilized to balance one´s yin and yang energy. If you are one that experiences restless sleep due to bad dreams, you might use a garnet under your pillow to ward off these bad dreams and the evil spirits that might the cause of them. It is also meant to cure any inflammatory disorders of the body, stops hemorrhaging, and brings a silence to anger and emotional discord. With these powerful, life-balancing abilities, it is no surprise that people born in the month of January are described as, ambitious, and natural-born leaders. People with these characteristics might be individuals who travel and explore. The gift of a garnet will be a protective gem of these journeyers, a gift of love and a desire that they have safe travels and return soon.

The January birthstone garnet have unique light transmission qualities, and some garnets seem to change color in various light conditions.  With daylight conditions some garnets have many different colors, but in incandescent light they generally appear reddish or pink/purple in color.  Garnets that are more opaque (less color) are often the ones used for industrial purposes instead of those that are used as gemstones most commonly those that appear in shades of green, red, orange, and yellow.

January Birth Flower:

The Snowdrop is the January birth flower representing love, fascination, and purity. Meanwhile, the carnation is the birth flower of January and symbolizes: love, pride, distinction, and beauty for those that follow British traditions.

January Birth Tree:

The Cypress tree is said to symbolize understanding the role of sacrifice and has been associated with the Hades, God of the underworld.

Famous People Born in January:

Oprah Winfrey – January 29, 1954

Tom Selleck – January 29, 1945

Eli Manning – January 3, 1981

Drew Brees – January 15, 1979

Benjamin Franklin – January 17, 1706

To learn more about your birthstone garnet check out Wikipedia.

– See more at: http://birthstonesbymonths.net/january-birthstone-garnet/#sthash.Zp2ax2EG.dpuf