A Little About Moon Phases

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The Moon goes through four different phases every month.

The full (Mother) Moon-this lasts from one night before until one night after the date the Full Moon is shown on a regular calendar. A full Moon is used to bring things
to you. A good time for spells for your income to increase, protection for yourself, someone else or your home, etc. It is also the time to consecrate a Ritual tool. To
hold a Handfasting, marriage or Wiccianing.

Next comes the Waning Moon. This period lasts from the second night after the full Moon until one night before the New Moon. During this period it is a time to send
things away from you such as a build up of negativity around you or to charm an object to help you control a bad habit.

Then come the New (Crone) Moon. This phase is from one night before until one night after the date the New Moon appears on a regular calendar. This is the time
when being able to banish or send away bad habits, negaitive energy, do a house cleansing, etc.

Lastly is the Waxing Moon. This is a time of new begginings and to bring good things to you. Use it to start a new project or job or getting to know someone better,
etc. It is also a good time for a marriage or Handfasting. To charm an object to carry with you for protection.

While I have only listed a very few things that work out better if done during the correct Moon phase. They are meant as a guideline to get you thinking about what
else you may do during the correct phase.

Remember every time you do a spell or charm an object what energy you send out comes back to you three times as strong-The Law of Three.

General Coven Information

No two covens are ever actually a like but most do follow some common guidelines. This is just a brief outline I will go into more detail for each thing in separate posts.

They usually have a minimum of thirteen members. These would include twelve regular members being in the novice or adept class. Also a Priestess, Priest, High Priestess, High Priest or a combination of two or more of these. Part of the reason for this is the Priestess or Priest will usually control and channel the energy the coven is raising to accomplish whatever it is they are trying to do. If the group is much larger and there is not a strong enough Witch to control the power/energy being raised bad things can happen (I was visiting a coven that had twenty members and the Priestess was not strong enough to control the power that was raised and the sacred circle had not been open properly. So energy escaped from it and blew out three windows in the members home the meeting was at. Now one was seriously hurt just a couple of scratches). Usually with a coven this large a High Priestess and/or High Priest preside over the gathering as the coven is getting close to being divided into two separate covens. Some covens are a lot larger than thirteen members and work out well.

A regular indoor and/or outdoor gathering place. This can be somewhere specific for every gathering or the place might even rotate trough members homes and/or yards.

Almost every coven will gather for the eight Sabbats and thirteen Esbats. There is usually a time for socializing after the Circle and Ritual is done for members to visit, eat and drink.

The Priestess and/or Priest are the leader of the individual coven, One or both of them decide the roles and duties of the other members. They help meditate problems between coven members. Iniate novices and train adepts.

A novice is a brand new member of the coven and much of the time has no training in The Craft. In most covens a year and day is the time length for a novice to be active in the coven before becoming a full coven member. Once they have become a coven members they move to the Adept level.

Adepts help to train the novices. They might also depending on the coven leaders lead rituals usually on the Esbats. They can ask to be trained as a Priestess or Priest.

The High Priestess and/or High Priest usually have more than one coven they help and oversee. One or both train the Priestesses and/or Priests. They mediate between coven members if the Priestess and/or Priest have had no luck in doing so. They mediate between members and the coven Priestess and/or Priest. They may also need to mediate between the coven Priestess and Priest, which is very rare.

Some covens have a dress code (i.e. must were a cape without or with a hood, a certain color dress or shirt, etc). Some do not care what a member wears as long as it is not degrading to the ritual and/or people. Some go Skyclad (nude).

Suggestions for possibly finding a coven in your area:

If there is a “New Age’ shop that sells Witch supplies go in a few times and talk with the employees after a few visits and they have become comfortable with you ask them if they know of a coven. Never ask for the coven leaders phone number but offer to give them your number to pass on to the coven leader. As most Witches are still in the “broom closet” for fear of rejection by friends, family, co-workers, etc.

This is a general search link on Google.com that might help you find a coven and/or other Witches in your area.

http://nortonsafe.search.ask.com/web?q=witchvox&o=apn10506&prt=cr

Copyright 2015 Lady Beltane

Butter Tart Recipe

This is a great recipe to make for May’s full Moon.

A little Fairy Lore: Remember to set a couple out for the Fae Folk as they wander about the next few nights. You can ring a bell to call the Fae and the will see what you have left them and bless your gardens accordingly. I would suggest a little warm milk with the tarts to help them wash it down. Do not be discouraged if you see the solid food and drink still there in the morning the Fae take the essence and flavor of the food with them to share with those at home and/or use at a later time.

Recipe from: http://www.joyofbaking.com/printpages/ButterTartsprint.html

 

Butter Tarts Recipe

Pie Crust Pastry:  In a food processor, place the flour, salt, and sugar and process until combined. Add the butter and process until the mixture resembles coarse meal (about 15 seconds). Pour 1/8 cup (30 ml) water in a slow, steady stream, through the feed tube until the dough just holds together when pinched. If necessary, add more water. 

Turn the dough onto your work surface and gather into a ball. Flatten into a disk, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for about one hour before using. This will chill the butter and relax the gluten in the flour. 

After the dough has chilled sufficiently, place on a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough and cut into 12 – 4 inch (10 cm) rounds. (To prevent the pastry from sticking to the counter and to ensure uniform thickness, keep lifting up and turning the pastry a quarter turn as you roll (always roll from the center of the pastry outwards).) Gently place the rounds into a 12-cup muffin tin. Cover and place in the refrigerator for about 30 minutes to firm the dough.

Butter Tart Filling: In the bowl of your electric mixer, or with a hand mixer, beat the butter and sugar until creamy and smooth. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, and then the vanilla extract. Stir in the cream. If using nuts and/or raisins, place a spoonful in the bottom of each tart shell and then fill the unbaked tart shells with the filling. Bake at 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) for about 15 – 20 minutes or until the pastry has nicely browned and the filling is puffed and set. Remove from oven and place on a wire rack to cool. Serve at room temperature or chilled.

Makes 12 – 4 inch tarts.

Scan for Demonstration Video

Pie Crust Pastry:

1 1/4 cups (175 grams) all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon (15 grams) granulated white sugar

1/2 cup (113 grams) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1 inch (2.5 cm) pieces

1/8 to 1/4 cup (30 – 60 ml) ice water

Butter Tart Filling:

1/3 cup (70 grams) unsalted butter, softened

1 cup (210 grams) light brown sugar

2 large eggs

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1/4 cup (60 ml) light cream (half-and-half)

1/2 cup (120 ml) raisins or chopped nuts (pecans or walnuts)

Elemental Correspondences – 4

This information is from: http://www.rollanet.org/~mdoc/pagan/color.elements.html

Color Correspondences

The Chart shows correspondence between color, angel, day, planet, and the signs of the zodiac.

Color Angel Day Planet Sign of the Zodiac
Golden-Yellow Michael Sunday Sun Leo
Blue Gabriel Monday Moon Cancer
Red Samael Tuesday Mars Aries and Scorpio
Green Raphael Wednesday Mercury Gemini and Virgo
Purple Sachiel Thursday Jupiter Sagittarius and Pisces
Pink Anael Friday Venus Taurus and Libra
Silver-Crystal Cassiel Saturday Saturn Capricorn and Aquarius

Element Correspondences

Element Correspondences
Herbs Stones Metals Instrument Animal Color Season Time Tool Sence Direction
Earth patchouly emerald, peridot iron percussion dog green winter night pentacle touch north
Air dill pumice, mica tin flute spider yellow spring dawn wand hearing, smell east
Fire thistles jasper,lava brass guitar shark red summer noon knife sight south
Water rose amethyst mercury bell turtle blue autumn dusk cup, cauldron taste west

Full Moon Names-Native American

“Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it.
Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.”
  Chief Seattle 1854 

American Indians gave names to each of the full moons to keep track of the passing year. The names are associated with the entire month until the next full moon occurs. Since a lunar month averages 29 days, the dates of the moons change from year to year. Here are titles most closely associated with calendar months.

Abenaki
Northeast, Maine
Abenaki Children
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
Mid-March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
alamikos
piaôdagos
mozokas
sigwankas
sogalikas
kikas
nokahigas
temaskikos
temezôwas
skamonkas
penibagos
mzatanos
pebonkas
greetings maker moon
makes branches fall in pieces moon
moose hunter moon
spring season maker moon
sugar maker moon
Abenaki Bowlfield maker moon
hoer moon
grass cutter moon
cutter moon
corn maker moon
leaf falling moon
freezing river maker moon
winter maker moon

Algonquin
Northeast to Great Lakes
Algonquin Mother and Child
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
squochee kesos
wapicuummilcum
namossack kesos
suquanni kesos
moonesquanimock kesos
twowa kesos
matterllawaw kesos
micheenee kesos
pohquitaqunk kesos
pepewarr
quinne kesos
Algonquin Masksun has not strength to thaw
ice in river is gone
catching fish
when they set indian corn
when women weed corn
when they hill indian corn
squash are ripe
when indian corn is edible
middle between harvest and eating corn
white frost on grass
much white frost on grass

Anishnaabe
(Chippewa, Ojibwe)

Great Lakes
Chippewa Man
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
gichi-manidoo-giizis
namebini-giizis
bebookwaadaagame-giizis(oog)
iskigamizige-giizis(oog)
waabigwani-giizis
ode’imini-giizis
aabita-niibino-giizis
miini-giizis
manoominike-giizis
binaakwe-giizis
gashkadino-giizis(oog)
manidoo-gizisoons
great spirits moon
sucker moon
snow crust moon
broken snowshow moon
blossom moon
strawberry moon
raspberry moon
Chippewa Beaded Bag c. 1900berry moon
rice moon
falling leaves moon
freezing moon
small spirits moon

Apache
Southern Plains
Apache Woman
Month Name of Moon
January
April
May
July
October
Apache Bagtime of flying ants
moon of the big leaves
season when the leaves are green
moon of the horse/time of ripeness
time when the corn is taken in

Arapaho
Great Plains
Arapaho Village
Month Name of Moon
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
late July
August
September
October
November
December
Arapaho Seed Bagwhen snow blows like spirits in the wind
frost sparkling in the sun
buffalo dropping their calves
ice breaking in the river
when the ponies shed their shaggy hair
when when the buffalo bellows
the hot weather begins
when the chokeberries begin to ripen
geese shedding their feathers
drying grass
falling leaves
when the rivers start to freeze
popping trees

Assiniboine
Northern Plains
Assiniboine Man and Dogs
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
wicogandu
amhanska
wicinstayazan
tabehatawi
indiwiga
wahequosmewi
wasasa
capasapsaba
wahpegiwi
anukope
cuhotgawi
wicogandu-sungagu
Assiniboine Headdresscenter moon
long dry moon
sore eye moon
frog moon
idle moon
full leaf moon
red berries
black cherries
yellow leaf
joins both sides
frost moon
center moon’s younger brother

Cherokee
East Coast, Carolinas
Cherokee Woman
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
unolvtana
kagali
anvhyi
kawohni
ansgvti
dehaluyi
kuyegwona
galohni
dulisdi
duninhdi
nvdadegwa
vskihyi
cold moon
bony moon
strawberry moon
flower moon
Cherokee Bottleplanting moon
green corn moon
ripe corn moon
drying up moon
nut moon
harvest moon
trading moon
snow moon

Cheyenne
Great Plains
Cheyenne Braves
Month Name of Moon
January
April
May
September
October
November
December
Cheyenne depiction of the Battle of Little Big Horn, c. 1878moon of the strong cold
when the geese lay eggs
when the horses get fat
drying grass moon
freeze begins on stream’s edge
deer rutting moon
when the wolves run together

Choctaw
Southeast, Mississippi, Louisiana
Choctaw Woman
Month Name of Moon Meaning
Early December
Late Dec – Early Jan
Late January
Early February
Late Feb – Early March
April
May
Early June
Late June – Early July
Late July – Early August
Late August – September
October
November
Hash Haponi
Hash Haf
Hash Chaf Iskono
Hash Chaf Chito
Hash Mali
Hash Bissi
Hash Bihi
Hash Takkon
Hash Watallak
Hash Luak Mosholi
Hash Tek Inhasi
Hash Koinchush
Hash Koichus
moon of cooking
moon of sassafras
Choctaw Bagmoon of little famine
moon of big famine
moon of winds
moon of blackberry
moon of mulberry
moon of peach
moon of the crane
green corn festival
courting time
moon of the wildcat
moon of the panther

Comanche
Southern Plains
Comanche Chief Quanah Parker
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
toh mua
positsu mua
tahpooku mua
tahma mua
totsiyaa mua
puhi mua
urui mua
tahma mua
taboo mua
yuba mua
yubaubi mua
wahi mua
year moon
sleet moon
Comanche Arrowheadcottonball moon
new spring moon
flower moon
leaf moon
hot moon
summer moon
paperman moon
fall moon
heading to winter moon
evergreen moon

Cree
Northern Plains, Canada
Cree Moose Hunter
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
gishepapiwatekimumpizun
cepizun
migisupizum
kiskipizun
aligipizun
sagipukawipizun
opaskwuwipizun
opunhopizun
weweopizun
opinahamowipizun
kaskatinopizun
papiwatiginashispizun
moon when the old fellow spreads the brush
Cree Moccasinsold moon
eagle moon
gray goose moon
frog moon
moon leaves come out
moon when ducks begin to molt
moon young ducks begin to fly
snow goose moon
moon the birds fly south
moon the rivers begin to freeze
moon when the young fellow spreads the brush

Creek
Southeast, Alabama, Georgia
Creek Children
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
rv’fo cusee
hotvlee-hv’see
tasahcucee
tasahcee-rakko
kee-hvsee
kvco-hvsee
hiyucee
hiyo-rakko
otowoskucee
otowoskv-rakko
echolee
rvfo-rakko
Creek Potwinter’s younger brother
wind moon
little spring moon
big spring moon
mulberry moon
blackberry moon
little harvest
big harvest
little chestnut moon
big chestnut moon
frost moon
big winter

Haida
Alaska
Haida Canoe
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
táan kungáay
hlgit’ún kungáay
xitgáas kungáay
xíit kungáay
tahálaa kungáay
gáan kungáay
chíin kungáay
k’íit’aas kungáay
kálk kungáay
cha’áaw kungáay
t’a’áaw kungáay
gáangálang kungáay
bear hunting moon
goose moon
Haida Polenoisy goose moon
migratory geese moon
food-gathering moon
berries ripen moon
salmon moon
cedar bark for hat & baskets
ice moon
bears hibernate
snow moon
ripe berries

Hopi
Southwest, Arizona
Hopi Children
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
paamuya
powamuya
osomuyaw
kwiyamuyaw
hakitonmuyaw
uyismuya
nimanmuya
paamuya
nasanmuyaw
angaqmuyaw
kelmuya
kyaamuya
moon of life at it’s height
moon of purification and renewal
moon of the whispering wind
moon of windbreak
Hopi Weavingmoon of waiting
moon of planting
moon of the homedance
moon of joyful
moon of full harvest
moon of long hair
moon of fledgling hawk
moon of respect

Kalapuya
Pacific Northwest, Oregon
Kalapuya Man
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
atalka
atchiulartadsh
atcha-uyu
amanta kotantal
atantal
anishnalya
ameku
akupiu
atchiutchutin
atchalankuaik
alangitapi
adshampak
stay inside
out of food
women dig camas
time for pounding camas
Kalapuya Bowlcamas blooming time
camas ripe
mid summer
end of summer
after harvest
start getting sagittair roots
moving inside for winter
not bad weather

Lakota
Northern Plains
Lakota Woman
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
wiotehika wi
cannapopa wi
istawicayazan wi
wihakaktacepapi wi
canwape to wi
wipazatkan waste wi
canpasapa wi
wasutoa wi
canwape gi wi
canwape kasna wi
waniyetu wi
wanicokan wi
hard moon
moon when the trees crack because of the cold
moon of the sore eyes
moon when the wife had to crack bones for marrow fat
moon of the green leaves
moon when the berries are good
Lakota Basketmoon when the chokecherries are black
moon of the ripening
moon of the brown leaves
moon when the wind shakes off leaves
moon when winter begins
moon when the deer shed their antlers

Mohawk
Eastern Woodlands
Mohawk Man
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
tsothohrhko:wa
enniska
ennisko:wa
onerahtokha
onerahtohko:wa
ohiari:wa
ohiarihko:wa
seskehko:wa
seskhoko:wa
kentenha
kentenhko:wa
tsothohrha
Mohawk Basketthe big cold
lateness
much lateness
budding time
time of big leaf
ripening time
time of much ripening
time of freshness
time of much freshness
time of poverty
time of much poverty
time of cold

Omaha
Central Plains, Nebraska
Omaha Boy
Month Name of Moon
January
February
March
June
July
September
Omaha Drummoon when snow drifts into tipis
moon when geese come home
little frog moon
moon when the buffalo bulls hunt the cows
moon when the buffalo bellow
moon when the deer paw the earth

Passamaquoddy
Northeast U.S. – St. Croix River Region
Passamaquoddy Mary Selmore, age 101
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
opolahsomuwehs
piyatokonis
siqon
ponatom
siqonomeq
nipon
accihte
apsqe
toqakiw
amilkahtin
kelotonuhket
punam
whirling wind moon
when the spruce tips fall
spring moon
spring moon
Passamaquoddy Birch Bark Canoealewive moon
summer moon
ripening moon
feather shedding moon
autumn moon
harvest moon
freezing moon
frost fish moon moon

Ponca
Southern Plains
Ponca with Tomahawk
Month Name of Moon
January
March
June
July
August
October
Ponca and Sioux Battle Scene c. 1858snow thaws moon
water stands in the ponds moon
hot weather begins moon
middle of summer moon
corn is in the silk moon
moon when they store food in caches

Potawatomi
Great Lakes
Potawatomi Men
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
May
June
July
August
October
November
mkokisis
mnokesis
cicakkises
te’minkeses
msheke’kesis
we’shkitdaminkese
e’mnomukkises
e’sksegtukkisis
pne’kesis
Potawatomi Shoulder Bagmoon of the bear
moon of the rabbit
moon of the crane
moon of the strawberry
moon of the turtle
moon of the young corn
moon of the middle
moon of the first frost
moon of the turkey

Pueblo
Southwest, New Mexico
Pueblo Woman
Month Name of Moon
February
March
June
September
November
Pueblo Potmoon of the cedar dust wind
moon when the leaves break forth
moon when the leaves are dark green
moon when the corn is taken in
moon when all is gathered in

Shawnee
Midwest, Ohio, Pennsylvania
Shawnee Leader
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
ha’kwi kiishthwa
haatawi kiishthwa
shkipiye kwiitha
poosh kwiitha
hotehimini kiishthwa
mshkatiwi kiishthwa
miini kiishthwa
po’kamawi kiishthwa
ha’shimini kiishthwa
sha’teepakanootha
kini kiishthwa
washilatha kiishthwa
severe moon
crow moon
sap moon
Shawnee Dresshalf moon
strawberry moon
raspberry moon
blackberry moon
plum moon
papaw moon
wilted moon
long moon
eccentric moon

Shoshone
Great Basin, Nevada, Wyoming
Shoshone Woman and Child
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
goa-mea’
isha-mea’
yu’a-mea’
badua’-mea’
buhisea’-mea’
daa’za-mea’
daza-mea’
guuteyai-mea’
yeba-mea’
naa-mea’
ezhe’i-mea’
dommo-mea’
freezing
Shoshone Dance Shield c. 1890coyote
warming
melting
budding
summer starting
summer
hot
fall
rutting
cold
winter

Sioux
Great Plains, Dakotas, Nebraska
Sioux Woman
Month Name of Moon
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
Sioux Tipiwolves run together
dark red calves
sore eye moon
red grass appearing
moon when the ponies shed
strawberry moon
red blooming lilies
cherries turn black
calves grow hair
changing season
falling leaves
when deer shed their horns

Tlingit
Pacific Northwest Coast
Tlingit and Canoe
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
t’aawak dís
s’eek dís
héentáanáx kayaan’i dís
x’eigaa kayaaní dís
at gadaxéet yinaa dís
at gadaxéet dís
xaat dísi
sha-ha-yi
dis yádi
dís tlein
kukahaa dís
shanáx dís
goose moon
black bear moon
underwater plants sprout
budding moon of plants and shrubs
moon before pregnancy
Tlingit Raven Maskbirth moon
salmon moon
berries ripe on mountain
big moon
young animals moon
scraping moon
unborn seals are getting hair

Winnebago
Great Lakes
Winnebago with Pipe
Month Name of Moon
February
April
May
July
November
December
Winnebago Wigwamfish-running moon
planting corn moon
hoeing-corn moon
corn-popping moon
little bear’s moon
big bear’s moon

Wishram
Columbia River, Washington, Oregon
Wishram Catching Salmon
Month Name of Moon
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
her cold moon
shoulder to shoulder around the fire moon
Wishram Petroglyphslong days moon
the 8th moon
the 9th moon
fish spoils easily moon
salmon go up rivers in a group moon
blackberry patches moon
her acorns moon
travel in canoes moon
snowy mountains in the morning moon
her winter houses moon

Zuni
Southwest, New Mexico
Zuni Woman
Month Name of Moon Meaning
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
September
October
December
dayamcho yachunne
onon u’la’ukwamme
li’dekwakkya ts’ana
li’dekwakkya lana
yachun kwa’shi’amme
ik’ohbu yachunne
dayamcho yachunne
li’dekwakkwya ts’ana
li’dekwakkwya lana
ik’ohbu yachunne
when limbs of trees are broken by snow
Zuni Jewelryno snow in trails
little sand storm
great sand storm
no name
turning moon
when limbs of trees are broken by fruit
corn is harvested
big wind moon
sun has traveled home to rest

    source: americanindian.net

Planetarium Homepage

Power Ink Recipe and Full Moon Spell

A simple spell to invoke your own power, and the power of the full moon to manifest your needs and desires.

 

Power Ink Recipe and Full Moon Spell The Magick Kitchen800x656I lay there on a chase lounger, in the backyard closing my eyes and listening. The air was cool, and the breeze subtle. I could hear the leaves of the giant maple tree gently rustling above me. The fire was crackling slowly eating away at the pine logs. The muffled midnight chatter of the neighborhood was somehow soothing as I lay there.

Although, my eyes were closed I could feel her rising above me. Displaying her silver silent power over my body, filling my mind with motivating energy. I was taken back to my childhood, when I would sneak out of my bedroom window to the back yard, where I would lay in the grass bathing in her silver light.

She beckoned me in words unspoken, “Open your eyes and look upon me”. I slowly opening my eyes, there she was in the sky. As I stirred from my calm meditation, there she was bright and full. She looked distant and yet felt so close to me. For a moment, I thought I could touch her.

On the table before me, I set out candles, paper, a dip pen, and ink. The candles burned bright enough for me to see as I uncorked this unique ink. A dark purple ink made form cabbage. An ink that will be my conduit of power between myself and the moon on this night.

Invoking the power of the Full Moon is a common practice for many Witches, Wiccans, and Pagans. We draw down the moon, and perform dedicated rituals to the moon, both simple and elaborate. The lure and power of the Moon is infinite and rejuvenating. She speaks to use of the eternal cycles of femininity, life, death, and rebirth. She shows us her power in all forms, from light to dark. Perhaps this is why we love her so dearly.

Purple CabbageCabbage is not always something we think of when we discuss the full moon. In fact, I am confident many have never made the connection. I certainly did not immediately associate the two.

Cabbage is actually very connected to the full moon, as are many other round vegetables. Cabbage is believed to house all the powers of the moon and to promote power. In my findings cabbage makes an effective ink for full moon spell work. Ideally, purple cabbage. The power brought forth from the two are astonishing.

Below is a full moon spell you might want to try. It is very easy to set up and perform. It can also be applied to any need or desire.

Full Moon Power Spell & Cabbage Ink
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Ingredients
  1. 2C Sacred Water
  2. 2C Fresh Purple Cabbage, roughly chopped
  3. 2T White Vinegar
Instructions
  1. Place cabbage, water, and vinegar in a sauce pan, and bring to a boil. Simmer for 30 minutes.
  2. Strain out the cabbage and allow the liquid to simmer for another 10-15 minutes, reducing the liquid by more than half. You will want to stick close to your cabbage liquid as it simmers so it does not reduce too quickly and burn.
  3. Cool and store in a tight sealing glass container, like a canning jar.
Using this recipe for Magick
  1. As mentioned before Cabbage is very much linked to the moon. More so Purple Cabbage is linked to raising power. You may use this ink to write spells, Magickal recipes, and the like. Use it with a dip pen or quill on linen paper for best results. The simmering and reduction of the cabbage liquid creates a thin dark purple ink.
  2. Purple Cabbage is great for invoking power which is a universal and necessary aspect to any spell or ritual. This make the ink very versatile. It can be used in any spell when you are looking for a boost.
  3. As for using this ink in a specific spell, you only need to conduct your spell around writing. Once you create your circle or sacred space, use the Cabbage ink to scribe your specific intention.
  4. Next you will burn the paper to release and send off the spell’s energy. As noted in the beginning of this post, I prefer to do this under the direct light of the moon, outside by a small fire. You can do this any time you see fit. Feel free to chant, sing, or meditate on your words and intention as necessary. It really is that simple.
  5. You can also use this ink to color items like cloth and eggs. So think of other ways you can use your ink.
By Leandra Witchwood ©2015, The Magick Kitchen

Some of May’s Moon Names

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full-moon-name-may-2013                                                 download (1)

If you know other names the May Full Moon is called by please add it in the comments. Thank you. Mya what you ask for this night be fulfilled. Blessed be.