Irish Healing Waters Spell

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Other Definitions of Pagan

From the Urban Dictionary:

A somewhat vague term derived from from the Latin word paganus. Pagan is a term which refers to a variety of different religions ranging from Wicca, to that of ancient Egypt and even Hinduism, among many others. Some Pagans are of no specific religion, but rather are eclectic. In general Pagan religions have more than one deity, or many gods which are aspects of one (an idea similar to that of the Christian trinity). Another quite common feature of Pagan religions are that they tend to be nature oriented. Pagan can also be used as a derogatory word for any non-Judeo/Christian/Islamic religion.
“The religion of the ancient Greeks is a Pagan religion”
by Megan Bennett May 25, 2004
From Merriam-Webster Dictionary:
noun pa·gan ˈpā-gən

1:  heathen 1; especially :  a follower of a polytheistic religion (as in ancient Rome)

2
:  one who has little or no religion and who delights in sensual pleasures and material goods :  an irreligious or hedonistic person
From Dictionary.Com:
noun
1.

(no longer in technical use) one of a people or community observing a polytheistic religion, as the ancient Romans and Greeks.
2.

a member of a religious, spiritual, or cultural community based on the worship of nature or the earth; a neopagan.
3.

Disparaging and Offensive.

  1. (in historical contexts) a person who is not a Christian, Jew, or Muslim; a heathen.
  2. an irreligious or hedonistic person.
  3. an uncivilized or unenlightened person.
adjective
4.

of, relating to, or characteristic of pagans.
5.

Disparaging and Offensive.

  1. relating to the worship or worshipers of any religion that is neither Christian, Jewish, nor Muslim.
  2. irreligious or hedonistic.
  3. (of a person) uncivilized or unenlightened.

Based On Random House Dictionary:

Heathen and pagan are primarily historical terms that were applied pejoratively, especially by people who were Christian, Jewish, or Muslim, to peoples who were not members of one of those three monotheistic religious groups. Heathen referred especially to the peoples and cultures of primitive or ancient tribes thought to harbor unenlightened, barbaric idol worshipers: heathen rites; heathen idols.
Pagan, although sometimes applied similarly to those tribes, was more often used to refer specifically to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who worshiped the multiple gods and goddesses said to dwell on Mount Olympus, such as Zeus and Athena (called Jupiter and Minerva by the Romans). The term was applied to their beliefs and culture as well: a pagan ritual; a pagan civilization.
Contemporary paganism, having evolved and expanded in Europe and North America since the 20th century, includes adherents of diverse groups that hold various beliefs, which may focus, for example, on the divinity of nature or of the planet Earth or which may be pantheistic or polytheistic. In modern English, heathen remains an offensive term, used to accuse someone of being unenlightened or irreligious; pagan, however, is increasingly a neutral description of certain existing and emerging religious movements.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.

Spell for making a Sacred Place

This is a spell that can be used to make a sacred place, which is different than a sacred circle. This can be used when you want to do a spell or mix up a potion and you do not have time to do a full circle. A scared place  is only in place while you are using it and then it melts away. It will keep the energies raised in check but very important to ground any left over energy before movi8ng away from where you cast it.

I make this place a sacred space, you made .

A warm and comfortable place.

A space to protected and used for my craft with honesty and fairness,

Impenetrable by those who would use it with dishonesty and unfairness.

I dedicate this space to Air, Water, Fire, Earth, all Deities, positive Entities and Magickal Beings who help and guide my craft with these words,”And it harms none.”

So mote it be.

Coppyright 2008 Lady Beltane

Full Wicce Rede

Being known as the counsel of the Wise Ones:

Bide the Wiccan laws ye must- in perfect love an’ perfect trust.

Live an’let live- fairly take an’fairly give.

To bind the spell every time, let the spell be spirly give.

Cast the Circle thrice about to keep the evil sake in rhyme.

Soft of eye an’ light of touch – speak little, listen much.

Deosil go by the waxing Moon – sing an’ dance the Wiccan rune.

Widdershins go when the Moon doth wane, an’ the Werewolf howls by the dread Wolfsbane,

When the Lady’s Moon is new, kiss the hand to her times two.

When the Moon rides at her peak then your heart’s desire seek.

Heed the Northwind”d might gale – lock the door and drop the sail.

When the wind comes from the South, love will kiss thee on the mouth.

When winds blows from the East, except the new and set the feast.

When the West wind blows o’er the thee, departed spirits restless be.

Nine woods in the Cauldron go – burn them quick an’ burn them slow.

Elder be the LAdy’s tree – burn it not or cursed ye”ll be.

When the Wheel begins to turn – let the Beltane fires burn.

When the Wheel has turned a Yule, light a Log an’ let Pan rule.

Heed ye flower, bush an’ tree – by the Lady blessed be.

Where rippling waters go – cast a stone an’ truth ye’ll know.

When ye have need, hearken not to other’s greed.

With the fool no season spend, or be counted as a friend.

Merry meet an’ Merry part- bright the cheeks an’ warm the heart.

Mind the Threefold law ye should – three times bad and three times good.

When misfortune is enow, wear the blue star on thy brow.

True in love ever be unless thy lover’s false to thee.

Eight words the Wicce Rede fulfill-

an’ harm it none, do what ye will.

These are the guidelines of our Craft and faith that most Witches that walk in the Light follow. Some of the spelling may seem off to today’s standards, but they are old English.

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What is a Witch? by Ann Moura

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Reprinted with permission from the author, Ann Moura. Introduction no specific page number from the book Witchcraft An Alternative Path. I wrote to Ms Moura asking her permission more than 3 years ago to post this on another site and was delighted to receive a response from the author herself. Not just a form letter but a real note she had taken the time to write to me. I have it saved as one of my most special emails ever!

Many people have asked me over the years: What does a Witch believe in?” “Are you a good Witch or a bad Witch?” “Do you put hexes and curses on people?” and other such questions. I picked up a copy of Witchcraft an Alternative Path by Ann Moura off a table in a discount book store, it was on sale for $3.00 dollars so I figured at that price it would make a nice addition to my personal library. When I got home and opened it I was so surprised to find the perfect explanation of what it means to be a modern day Witch.  It is one book I go to for reference often.

“A Witch stands between the worlds of physical being and spiritual being, communicating with plants and animals, the energies of Nature, the spirit entities of other worlds, and the spirits of ancestors or the recently deceased.

She respects the world and sees herself in harmony with her surroundings and with her fellow beings. The changing of the seasons, the scents in the air, the comings and goings of animals, birds, fish, insects, and reptiles are all observed and understood as part of a vast integrated pattern of life.

She is the shaman, medicine person, healer, herbalist, and spiritualist found in both ancient and modern societies, linking the past, the present, and the future.”

While Ms Moura uses the feminine pronoun in the above excerpt; males who practice The Craft are also referred to as Witches, not warlocks or wizard as is commonly thought.

Defining a Pagan

Pentagram

After a comment the original of this post received I realized I was only presenting a Wicca’s point of view on what a Pagan is. This made me want to change what I had posted to quote other sources as well. I think I have found a wider range of the definition of the word Pagan. I know it might not completely cover everyone’s opinion of what a Pagan is but it gives us room for thought and discussion. Thank you, Sean for your comment that made me want to broaden what I had posted.

“When one defines oneself as Pagan,
it means she or he follows an earth or nature religion,
one that sees the divine manifest in all creation.
The cycles of nature are our holy days, the earth is our temple,
its plants and creatures our partners and teachers.
We worship a deity that is both male and female,
a mother Goddess and a father God,
who together created all that is, was, or will be.
We respect life, cherish the free will of sentient beings,
and accept the sacredness of all creation.” —

Edain McCoy

From the Urban Dictionary:

A somewhat vague term derived from from the Latin word paganus. Pagan is a term which refers to a variety of different religions ranging from Wicca, to that of ancient Egypt and even Hinduism, among many others. Some Pagans are of no specific religion, but rather are eclectic. In general Pagan religions have more than one deity, or many gods which are aspects of one (an idea similar to that of the Christian trinity). Another quite common feature of Pagan religions are that they tend to be nature oriented. Pagan can also be used as a derogatory word for any non-Judeo/Christian/Islamic religion.
“The religion of the ancient Greeks is a Pagan religion”
by Megan Bennett May 25, 2004
From Merriam-Webster Dictionary:
noun pa·gan \ˈpā-gən\

1:  heathen 1; especially :  a follower of a polytheistic religion (as in ancient Rome)

2
:  one who has little or no religion and who delights in sensual pleasures and material goods :  an irreligious or hedonistic person
From Dictionary.Com:
noun
1.

(no longer in technical use) one of a people or community observing a polytheistic religion, as the ancient Romans and Greeks.
2.

a member of a religious, spiritual, or cultural community based on the worship of nature or the earth; a neopagan.
3.

Disparaging and Offensive.

  1. (in historical contexts) a person who is not a Christian, Jew, or Muslim; a heathen.
  2. an irreligious or hedonistic person.
  3. an uncivilized or unenlightened person.
adjective
4.

of, relating to, or characteristic of pagans.
5.

Disparaging and Offensive.

  1. relating to the worship or worshipers of any religion that is neither Christian, Jewish, nor Muslim.
  2. irreligious or hedonistic.
  3. (of a person) uncivilized or unenlightened.

Based On Random House Dictionary:

Heathen and pagan are primarily historical terms that were applied pejoratively, especially by people who were Christian, Jewish, or Muslim, to peoples who were not members of one of those three monotheistic religious groups. Heathen referred especially to the peoples and cultures of primitive or ancient tribes thought to harbor unenlightened, barbaric idol worshipers: heathen rites; heathen idols.
Pagan, although sometimes applied similarly to those tribes, was more often used to refer specifically to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who worshiped the multiple gods and goddesses said to dwell on Mount Olympus, such as Zeus and Athena (called Jupiter and Minerva by the Romans). The term was applied to their beliefs and culture as well: a pagan ritual; a pagan civilization.
Contemporary paganism, having evolved and expanded in Europe and North America since the 20th century, includes adherents of diverse groups that hold various beliefs, which may focus, for example, on the divinity of nature or of the planet Earth or which may be pantheistic or polytheistic. In modern English, heathen remains an offensive term, used to accuse someone of being unenlightened or irreligious; pagan, however, is increasingly a neutral description of certain existing and emerging religious movements.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.

Spell/Prayer for PUT for Better Ah

download (4)

This is something else that is in my morning prayers daily and I also carry a stone with me empowered by the spell you can do too. I have to black stones empowered with this spell/prayer one is all little bigger then the pad of my thumb and triangular in shape. The other is bigger and has what looks like an Angel with it’s wings opened. When I first found the second one it was a fluke it was in a bag of river stones my older daughter had got for some landscape project at her old house. I was watering the plants we had just put in the ground and of course the rocks around them got wet. I looked down and saw the Angel, when the rock dried it was gone again but now from carrying it in my pocket and rubbing it the Angel shows all the time now.

To use as a spell you will need:

1 Black rock that you can have in your pocket to use like a worry stone as needed.

Running water to cleanse the stone of all energy but it and yours

A place in the Sun preferably outside where you can sit it on the ground on a day with a breeze

This should be done during the waxing or full Moon phases

If doing this to empower the black stone repeat it three times  at the end add “These are my words, This is my will for me. The following is said once, “So mote it be.”

The spell/prayers is as follows:

I ask for help with

Patience

Understanding and

Tolerance

for better

Acceptance of people, places, things, situations, attitudes, what people may say to or about me and the                          way they sometimes speak to me so I may live in better

Harmony within myself, family, home, work and world.